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Well, at least they did yesterday, a charter I had in a small sport skiff with two couples.

One of whom felt a little queasy an hour in, hid it well but finally 'fessed up.

Step One: We turn and head toward home. Psychologically this helps ("I won't be out here forever..").

Step two: "Here, drink some of this nice cold Canada Dry Ginger Ale (real ginger! says so on the label anyway. It either works, or is at least a decent placebo, so good either way).

After soda, Step Three: "Take the tiller, aw c'mon, try it, you'll like it". Well, she did, and though a nonsailor, began to get into it, and soon was doing a passable job of keeping the boat balanced close-hauled as we beat home, while concentrating on the jib telltales and the horizon and not on her tummy.

She was soon feeling much better, and we finished the sail without having had to shave all that much time off, so it turned out well for all. Plus, she did not have to feel like a killjoy because she wasn't, and she learned some sailing, close-hauled ain't that easy, if you can do that, then offwind's a "breeze"--literally.

Now I know there are patches and pills and other remedies, but I had to work with "materials on-hand". Oldies but goodies as it turned out. This could have been a "lemon" outing but ended up lemonade.

Other ideas welcome, so please chime in.
 

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Bill SV Rangatira
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Well, at least they did yesterday, a charter I had in a small sport skiff with two couples.

One of whom felt a little queasy an hour in, hid it well but finally 'fessed up.

Step One: We turn and head toward home. Psychologically this helps ("I won't be out here forever..").

Step two: "Here, drink some of this nice cold Canada Dry Ginger Ale (real ginger! says so on the label anyway. It either works, or is at least a decent placebo, so good either way).

After soda, Step Three: "Take the tiller, aw c'mon, try it, you'll like it". Well, she did, and though a nonsailor, began to get into it, and soon was doing a passable job of keeping the boat balanced close-hauled as we beat home, while concentrating on the jib telltales and the horizon and not on her tummy.

She was soon feeling much better, and we finished the sail without having had to shave all that much time off, so it turned out well for all. Plus, she did not have to feel like a killjoy because she wasn't, and she learned some sailing, close-hauled ain't that easy, if you can do that, then offwind's a "breeze"--literally.

Now I know there are patches and pills and other remedies, but I had to work with "materials on-hand". Oldies but goodies as it turned out. This could have been a "lemon" outing but ended up lemonade.

Other ideas welcome, so please chime in.
i always keep a jar of candied ginger on board for just such occasions
many sailors get seasick and once past it have a good trip
many are worried that getting seasick is a sign of being a novice and letting them know you have had it too will ease their concerns
 

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many are worried that getting seasick is a sign of being a novice and letting them know you have had it too will ease their concerns
Very very true. I always mention to people that Ellen MacArthur gets notoriously seasick when she first sets out. And there aren't many people in the world with as many sailing miles as she has.

The trick is to know it will end, do what you can, and be honest about how you are feeling.
 

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Ginger works. Even NASA has confirmed it. It is a "rubefacient", something that causes the capillaries to dilate and makes you flush a little redder. That increases oxygenation of tissues, and that reduces some naseau. Infirmaries also used to give it out for "jippy tummy" for the same reason.

You can also always improvise some neh quan (sp?) acupressure bands. About halfway between where your wrist and where a watch would normally be, feel the two ligaments going into the hand. Press a thumb between them and hold gentle pressure there. The wristbands use a plastic ball or button and strap it down, so it applies a gentle pressure. You can buy them, elastic bands with a button, works for some folks and of course not for some folks, but they're also cheap and easy to keep onboard. Couple of nickels or dimes and something to tie them down with would do.

There's an electric version of that, FDA approved and used for morning sickness, that also works very well IF it is positioned exactly right.

Ginger candy, ginger snaps, ginger tea...all can be put to other purposes if no one is feeling queasy.(G)
 

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I give people who I know are prone to seasickness the helm and I don't take them out in conditions that I know will make them miserable. When I've gotten seasick myself then sleeping at the end of my shift has been the best cure.
 

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Coke and club crackers seems to help my wife if she's feeling a little "off".

Also sitting in the stern rail seat with her head into the breeze seems to help her as much as steering the boat.
 

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I occasionally get mildly seasick, but not enough to render me incapable of managing the boat. It is just unpleasant.

I find that a slight change in course heading, 10-20 degrees, can make a big difference. Sometimes, a particular sea state induces mal de mer. Similarly, if you are motoring in waves, raising the mainsail to motorsail and slow rolling can sometimes help, too.
 

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When it comes to motion sickness remedies, I go by the intense and reliable research done by disinterested parties . . . The Myth Busters! They did a show on this. Adam and Grant were the Guinea pigs because they get sick SO easily. They built a motion chair (like NASA's but it didn't cost $125,000 and congressional mandate) and put those poor guys in it over and over and over again, each time with a different "remedy" but always with the same result. Sometimes voluminous result. I felt for them. Then ginger root was introduced. Adam spent 15 minutes in the chair without incident and Grant had a similar experience SO, since they are "what you call . . experts" they must be right!

Of course nothing beats the day they launched a water heater. That was righteous episode! Even better than the duct tape sloop.
 
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