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Discussion Starter #1
Maybe this is a dumb question but here goes anyway.

Are there any standards or usual colors for certain lines? I am redoing my running rigging, halyards mainly, and didn't know if you normally used, say, green for main, red for jib, blue for spinnaker, or whatever. Or if halyards were usually one color and sheets were a different color?

As I was looking at new lines I was wondering what color I would order and thought I would at least ask if there were any accepted standards.
 

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It doesn't really matter, IMHO....

However, I think most people have a white base weave with a colored stripped in it for their halyards (Jib and Main) and maybe a more colored one for their spinnaker. But if you want a green one for you main, a blue for the jib, yellow for the spinny, etc. go for it.

I have been on race boats where everything is different colored so that they are easy to tell apart when people are raising the spinny, rolling in the jib, extending the pole, the different sheets, etc. all at teh same time. On other boats that don't race, most are all pretty much white. Our boat is this way

DrB
 

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Line colors

My understanding is that there is no broad standard for line colors. That said, at the club where I sail, here are the colors that are used slightly more often than not:

Main halyard - white with blue/red flecks
Jib halyard - blue with white/red flecks
Spin halyard - white with red flecks

Main sheet - red, orange or white
Jib sheets - usually blue
Spin sheets - red and green to correspond to port/starboard. These colors are reversed for the one boat with separate sheets and guys.

Twings - white with red flecks
Topping lift - purple
Foreguy - yellow (these fade quickly and tend to look white, though)

I think the main value, though, is to have the colors different so that when you bring a non-sailor aboard you can identify a rope by color instead of function (eg, "purple" instead of "topping lift").
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Of course, a lot depends on the type of line. Some only comes with white background but others may have choice of background colors.

Anyway, I didn't think there was a standard but you never know until you ask.
 

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Larus Marinus
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A different colour code for each line, especially those on the same side of the boat. Try untangling two line of the same colour, or releasing the wrong one, for light entertainment.
 

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There isn't a standard, but try to apply your own logic. I have green for stbd jib halyard, red for port jib halyard, black (really dark blue) for spin halyard, white for topping lift, blue for downhaul, white and yellow for main.

Jib sheets are white with blue speck, spin sheets and twings are red/port and green/stbd.
 

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Telstar 28
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I've color-coded my lines by function.. since you can usually tell a starboard line from a port one... the halyard, sheets and furling line for the screacher/spinnaker are red, the lines for the mainsail are blue, the ones for the jib/genoa are green, the topping lift is white, the outhaul is black, etc...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yeah, I kinda like the idea of one color for all the main controls, one for the jib etc. as it shouldn't be too difficult to tell sheets from halyards. I am also going to use low stretch line for the halyards (crystalyne) and probably sta-set or sta-set x for the sheets so even though the flecks will be the same color, the pattern won't be the same to aid in identification.

As always, thanks for everyone's help and advice.
 

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Telstar 28
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Don't use StasetX for sheets... it's really too stiff to work well. :)
 

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Telstar 28
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Sta-Set is pretty good...it depends on whether you want low-stretch halyards or not. :) If you have dacron sails, don't bother with anything better than staset.
 

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Well, there are different reasons folks have for different colored lines. I my case I have a blue hull, close to pacific blue therefore all canvas is pacific blue as are fenders and other accessories. Halyards and sheets are white whereas traveller lines and rollerfiurler are blue with white tracers and boomvang and topping lift are white with blue tracers and so on, you get the idea blue & white color theme throughout. I have seen boats with black trim on the hull & deck who use black & white color theme throughout the running lines. It helps differentiate the different lines as well as color coordinate everything. Yes, it is the Admirals boat too and it really shows on the interior.
 

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I've got generally speaking blue for the main, green for spinaker, red for jibs, other colors of appropriate line for other tuning/reefing for the main etc.

Along with the appropriate cam cleats marked with what they are for etc too.

It helps the admiral, she like things color coded, and the interior is really nice as Kermie points out too.

I am using XLS extra extra? the lowest stretch of the three options for halyards, and sheets, lower grade for none stretch needs. Then I am now running carbon or one step below sails all around too!

Marty
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I am going to go with a low stretch halyard choice to replace a wire to rope halyard setup (yes I know about checking the sheaves and halyard exit points). I will use a low stretch line so I can go smaller diameter. However for sheets, smaller diameter is not necessary and since the lines are handled more frequently, larger lines are usually more comfortable. Plus the sheets are not nearly as long as a halyard so combined with a shorter length plus larger diameter for handling, needing a high tech line to control stretch is not so much of an issue. I am leaning towards Crystalyne for halyards and XLS for sheets.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I ordered my running rigging from Halls spars. They gave me an even better discount than what is listed. With a little research you can buy scrap cordage from this hyperlink for a fraction of the price. Some places may offer better deals on cordage, but not likely. I am no way affilated with them, I'm just passing on a good find.

Hall Spars & Rigging | Scrap Rope
 

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The only line that I've ever seen a specific color given has been boomvangs. This line is almost always black with some colored tracer. Otherwise, the only purpose in having different colored lines is for rapid identification, especially useful when you have novice crew.

Skipper, J/36 "Zero Tolerance"
 

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I kept it simple, sheets are Red w/white specks, halyards are white w/ red specks
 

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I kept it simple, sheets are Red w/white specks, halyards are white w/ red specks
So there's no difference between main, jib, or spin halyards. Interesting, I can't do that with the monkeys I sail with. They need colors.
 

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My little monkeys are use to our last boat, Sheets were green w/ white specks, Halyards were white w/ green specks

Lots of colors and things that shine, are bad ju-ju for my crew :D
 
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