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Master Mariner
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If any of you have heard the interview with Eric Kauffman about how his boat was leaking, I would appreciate a bit of feedback.
He stated that the hull/deck joint at the stern quarter was leaking because he broached his boat a few times. With the backstay secured to the stern post of the double ender, why would a broach tear open the hull/deck joint on the quarter?
I thought the Hans Christians were well built boats and even most poorly built boats should be able to stand up to a few broaches, one would hope. Does any of this make any sense to those of you familiar with the Hans Christians?
 
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Corsair 24
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I "surveyed" one intensely...although it was labeled as a union polaris 36...

most of the issues will depend or not on wether the wood has been attacked by dry rot or not...and since so MUCH of it was used in bulwarks, toerails, decks, joinery, hull deck joint, cockpit, cabin sides, floors etc...

it can be a massive issue

dont know if that helps any but I really got into one that pretty much was a write off from these issues
 

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Well, it's become obvious from the post mortem over on Cruisers Forum that REBEL HEART was certainly not a 'Real' Hans Christian... Probably not even a 'real' Union Polaris 36... Even Eric admitted his boat appeared to be somewhat of a "bastard child", not even built in the fashion of other Union 36s as described. This tale should certainly give pause to anyone contemplating the purchase of a Taiwanese boat of similar vintage, the manner in which some of that boat was put together is pretty jaw-dropping...

It's an awful lot to wade through, but some of the stuff that's been unearthed is pretty interesting:

Call for Help/ This American Life (Merged) - Cruisers & Sailing Forums

Cliff Notes Version is, that boat was rotten to its plywood core :)


 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks. That does shed some light on the subject.
 

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CaptA,

RH's deck was teak laid over plywood onto the beams. No fibreglass in the deck at all.
He found under the teak much of the plywood was rotted. He quoted in a post that he estimated 10% of the deck was bad with parts crumbled in his hand. Its unsure whether the deck was replaced or permanently fixed before this voyage.
The photo in Jons post shows an example.

As an aside...About 15 years ago I was crewing on a boat headed round the world from the great lakes with the idea to stop in Thailand to redo the decks complete as the price of Burmese teak was very cheap at the time. Its more expensive now, but still much cheaper to be done there than anywhere else.
 
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