SailNet Community banner

1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey. I have a huge question for y'all. I was recently offered a position at BPHC, and one of the requirements is to live in Boston and NOT one of the surrounding neighborhoods. The problem with this is, well, frankly, I cant afford to live in Boston with my large Dog. I do not believe in the disposable dog theory, so if he cant come, it looks like i cant take the job. Ideally, I would like to spend less than 1250 a month, but understand there can be some hidden expenses that can pop up. I tried looking for a roommate, but havent found anyone willing to accept my 75lbs lab... So, now I am seriously considering buying a used live aboard boat. Can anyone give a rough estimate on how much it would cost to live in a Boston Marina? (any hidden fees and expenses) I would ideally like to have a functional kitchen and at least a full size bed. Since it is Boston, I would def prefer one that has heat, but can live without AC. Could I find a decent one for around 25,000? I lived on a yacht before with a previous job for a few weeks (the bunks there i think didnt even qualify as a twin), but work picked up the tab. I dont know much about boats, but am willing to learn. Is this a fools idea?
 

·
Chastened
Joined
·
4,861 Posts
Keeping a large, high energy dog locked up on a boat all day, is about as cruel as "disposing" of it.

My opinion, is that it's not a good idea, but don't worry, I'm sure a liveaboard with a large dog will be along shortly to tell you that it's perfectly fine.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
5,921 Posts
I kind of agree with Bubble about keeping a large dog like that, although lots of people do it. I also think that docks are treacherous enough when covered with snow and ice. You'll have to worry about both you and your dog.

The marina fees and expenses are a small part of your budget. Don't forget the upkeep and maintenance of the boat.

If it was me, as much as I love boats and I had Mastiffs most of my life (so I know about the needs of a large -even if not high energy- dog), I wouldn't do it.
 

·
Chastened
Joined
·
4,861 Posts
I kind of agree with Bubble about keeping a large dog like that, although lots of people do it. I also think that docks are treacherous enough when covered with snow and ice. You'll have to worry about both you and your dog.

The marina fees and expenses are a small part of your budget. Don't forget the upkeep and maintenance of the boat.

If it was me, as much as I love boats and I had Mastiffs most of my life (so I know about the needs of a large -even if not high energy- dog), I wouldn't do it.
Donna,

I wouldn't factor in much money for maintenance and upkeep. This boat isn't going anywhere. This is another "help-me-beat-the-cost-of-rent" thread.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Actually, labs are quite adaptable. Mine is rather low energy for a lab, and we have lived in some rather unique circumstances thus far. If you exercise you dog properly, larger dogs are capable of living in smaller places. Its not like Im living him in a crate all day while Im at work.. Its a public health position, and well, people who work in the public health field aren't exactly paid very well. What are the typical up keep costs one would expect to pay? Thanks again for all your advice, I really do appreciate it.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
5,921 Posts
The boat maintenance costs will depend on the boat that you buy. If the previous owner(s) did what they should have, it won't be as much as if they let basic maintenance slide. There's no way of giving a rough figure without knowing in what condition the boat is.

You will more than likely have normal recurring costs plus whatever amount you'll need to bring it to a standard with which you can live. It will be less if you never intend to actually sail it but neglecting that part of it means when you go to sell it, you'll have to lower the asking price accordingly.

The better maintained the boat by previous owners, the more you'll pay upfront.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Donna,

I wouldn't factor in much money for maintenance and upkeep. This boat isn't going anywhere. This is another "help-me-beat-the-cost-of-rent" thread.
Do you have the link to this thread? Im new to this site, and tried to paste that thread name into the search, and it did not come up, even when i limited it to just the title. Sry to be a pain. Thanks again
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
627 Posts
What are they considering Boston? Brighton, Alston, and many others are parts of Boston and have many cheaper rentals. And if you can afford $25K and 1K a month rent, then buying a house would be your best bet. Lots of cheap houses to be had. If you buy a multi family house, the income from the other apartments in calculated as income when buying.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,556 Posts
Holly, my wife and I live aboard in Portland, Maine with our 70lb lab mix. He is very low energy. He loves to sleep all day and the boat is like a big den for him. Although we are very active outdoors he does not require us to exhaust him daily. Our boat is 40' and is very comfortable.

Do not discount AC though. Our pup would melt if we did not run the AC in the summer. Being in a slip you do not always have the wind direction to get air into the boat to help cool it.
 

·
Dirt Free
Joined
·
2,823 Posts
You sound like a realistic guy with realistic expectations. It has been done, it can be done again. Go down to the harbour and talk to the local liveabords. Most will be quite happy to discuss the ins & outs. We lived aboard near Toronto for 20years (with dogs) and while its not for everybody, I can't think of a better way to live.
 
  • Like
Reactions: holly1621

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I wouldnt qualify for a house. For one thing, I have a crap ton of student loans. The other issue is that I dont have 25k for a down payment. Talking with my bank, I would only have put between a 5-8% down payment on the 25K, but would prob put at least 12% if not more depending on the final cost of the boat. I want to keep some spare cash to fix anything that needs attention immediately. And if I could a decent boat for even less, that would be wonderful.

What type of boat would be best? I looked at house boats, but would like the option to actually use my boat to sail...but first and foremost it would have to be liveable. Im not anal about how things looks, rather than for things that are functional. Would a cruiser be better? Or is it really just about preference? Is either one of them more durable and capable of handling potential rough NE weather?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thats a good point. Thanks Tim. Thanks boat poker too. There isnt a better way to get real feedback than that.
 

·
Dirt Free
Joined
·
2,823 Posts
I wouldnt qualify for a house. For one thing, I have a crap ton of student loans. The other issue is that I dont have 25k for a down payment. Talking with my bank, I would only have put between a 5-8% down payment on the 25K, but would prob put at least 12% if not more depending on the final cost of the boat. I want to keep some spare cash to fix anything that needs attention immediately. And if I could a decent boat for even less, that would be wonderful.

What type of boat would be best? I looked at house boats, but would like the option to actually use my boat to sail...but first and foremost it would have to be liveable. Im not anal about how things looks, rather than for things that are functional. Would a cruiser be better? Or is it really just about preference? Is either one of them more durable and capable of handling potential rough NE weather?
It seemed at first you were talking about a floating apartment, now you are talking about actually sailing/cruising and you are into a completely different world. Suggest you look at Marine Survey 101 to see what you might be getting into.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
i was thinking floating apartment at first, but then it kinda seems like a missed opportunity if i didnt try to take it out a few time a year...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
393 Posts
i was thinking floating apartment at first, but then it kinda seems like a missed opportunity if i didnt try to take it out a few time a year...

As Boatpoker said, two completely different kettles of fish. In any large marina, you're likely to find at least a few boats for sale that are ONLY really viable as liveaboard boats. That is, like Bubble said, they're not going anywhere. The guy across the dock from me is a trucker and heavy equipment operator, and sometimes out of town for weeks at a time. He has a 50+ year old Grand Banks to liveaboard. He keeps it painted, and the brightwork varnished, but trust me, that thing aint leaving the slip anytime soon, and would probably require an investment of 50% of its current value (or more) to get it into reliable running condition.

Not sure how deep your convo with your bank was, but most banks will not loan on a boat over 10 years old. That would rule out most of your likely prospects. To get a loan on an older boat, you may have to go with a finance company, with a largish down payment and comparatively high interest.
 

·
██▓▓▒▒░&
Joined
·
13,645 Posts
BPHC? What's that, a hospital corporation?

And you're potentially moving there from...Chatham? Peoria? San Diego?

Just trying to see the bigger picture, and thinking that if the employer is big enough to have an HR department, someone there should be able to give you some advice on affordable housing. Either a broker they've worked with, or some hints as to where to look, because in any major metro area there are places that are way cheaper than others, overlooked spots, places that are hard to commute from, or served by rail....Since the salary is obviously not enough to make everything else insignificant, I'd want to know the employer is at least going to be a great place to work, and able to at least say they can help you find a place to live, or some advice from existing employees about what might work.

But moving to a new city AND making a radical lifestyle shift...unless you're a very flexible gypsy you might find moving to a small boat in the dead of winter with a large dog is a bit of a distraction. And a very inconvenient place to be, if the new job doesn't work out. Kinda like "Hey, I'm bored, let's get a couple of beers and learn how to skydive!"

I wouldn't suggest to anyone that they move onto a boat, unless they're primary goal was to LIVE ON A BOAT. Much less in a new city, in a cold winter, with a medium sized dog. (It isn't "large" unless you can saddle it up & ride it. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,474 Posts
Holly,
Do you like camping?
When travelling, are you okay with really cheap mom and pop motels with no room service, lousy mattresses and anemic water pressure?
Do you own less than 5 pairs of shoes?
Do all of your clothes fit into one piece of luggage?
Socially, do you like to have less than 3 people around at any given time
Do you enjoy winter camping?
Are you handy?
Do you own any tools?
Can your dog clamber down a ladder-steep five step staircase?
Do you put everything back where it belongs when you are done with it?


If the answer to any of the above questions is "No," keep looking for an affordable apartment.
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top