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A friend of mine installed radar on his Flika . It's a older set up so it's a big radome , to make things worse he took someones advice who told him the higher the better . I think it should be about 1' above the spreaders . He has it about 3' under the mast head . He says he is going to re mount it lower . He also has a Monitor wind vane mounted . Westmarine has a good deal on the basics , Radome and display for 2K .
 

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Newbe
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the response. I will be doing significant sailing on west coast (CA and WA) as well as Great Lakes area and one trip to Annapolis. I don't want to rely entirely on "being seen" with a small reflector rather want to "see" in addition to being seen. This coupled with the opportunity to pick up a brand new Radar and display at a below cost price prompts the question.

I am leaning towards a pole mount in stern but thought I would ask if anyone has gone down this road before.
 

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So long as the radar is mounted above your heads you will be ok.
Radar ping is a real thing and after long exposure to radar waves it can effect your inner ear.
The biggest problem I see with having a radar on such a small boat is your power supply.
My radar draws 55 watts when its running so I will only use it when motoring. I have three 12v house batteries on board and you can see the draw it has when you turn it on.
 

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A safer cheaper engineering solution would be to enable an AIS transponder. The tanker Captain would see you and ring you up for a conversation if you set his alarms off. Your ability as a radar observer and the requirements for lotsa amps is a problem. We run OpenCPN and AIS tracking which sets off an alarm when it calculates a CPA that poses a problem. You can load a .wav file that gets your attention, ours is the general quarters off the HMS Halifax.
 

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Newbe
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
A safer cheaper engineering solution would be to enable an AIS transponder. The tanker Captain would see you and ring you up for a conversation if you set his alarms off. Your ability as a radar observer and the requirements for lotsa amps is a problem. We run OpenCPN and AIS tracking which sets off an alarm when it calculates a CPA that poses a problem. You can load a .wav file that gets your attention, ours is the general quarters off the HMS Halifax.
If you do mount radar make sure the screen is easily viewable from the cockpit, it wasn't on my last boat and anytime it got foggy I found I didn't want to spend the time going to check it (and each time orient yourself with the display).

Honestly I haven't missed it on my new boat and have no plans to install it because of the weight.
AIS is something I am giving 'serious' thought to and will likely go that direction as it seems a simpler solution, but since I have such an opportunity to get a new unit for the same $$ as an AIS transponder, I felt like I should at least check out the possibilities.

10-4 on having the screen within easy sight. I would run the radar through a wireless setup and use the iPad as my backup. The radar could also be overlaid onto my chart plotter which I can easily see.

Thanks for the comments - very helpful.
 

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What is your battery bank made up of? Broadband 4G and 3G use very little power and have no main bang. There is a picture of someone with his arms around the Broadband dome on the Navico / Simrad / B&G / Lowrance website showing how it is safe to have the Broadband dome mounted anywhere on the boat with no fear of radiation exposure. The Broadband technology gives off something like 1/20th the amount of radiation as a cell phone. Broadband technology uses less power in active transmit mode than a pulse radar uses while in standby mode and again has no dead zone around the boat from main bang. I have been very happy with my B&G 4G w/ Zeus chartplotter.
 

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Newbe
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
My battery bank consists of 1 Grp 27 flooded marine and 1 Optima Blue top (Marine). The buying opportunity I have is not for a broadband radar and is why the deal has come up. The seller thought he was buying broadband but bought the wrong unit and now is dumping a new never used setup so that he can get the broadband.

I have a Garmin GPSMAP chart plotter with the ST2000 integrated and everything is tied into Wi-Fi so I can use iPad as backup.

Thanks for the reply.
 

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I would not go radar on your size boat...its just too much...

ais sounds good to me,

best yet on your size is a good lookout and a simple and effective radar reflector....on the backstay
 

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Newbe
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the input. I sail single handed so the radar and/or AIS is my lookout :)

A reflector is a "be seen" solution and in addition to this I want to "see" as then I have more control over the situation (if needed).
 

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hence my ais advice

radar is just too damn big and cumbersome on your boat too, especially with only 1 battery.

on our ocean crossings(not singlehanded) and having ais available too we never turned on the radar, nor felt the need for ais...eiether

however depending on where you sail both these are helpful.

my advice to you is simply that radar isnt necessarily needed, especially when your boat is so small(please dont take that as an offense...)

I singlehand as well...

not to be sarcastic but technically when singlehandes you are always "breaking the law" per the rules out there so not even radar or ais is a lookout legally.

good luck

ps. I have seen some awesome strobe ais combos out there lately and some can be hooked up to your plotter which I think would be ideal for you...

of course budget dependant.
 
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