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Low Salt Diet Sufferer
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hypothetical at this time... assuming equally good condition and price, which would you pick over the other, if offshore sailing were part of your plans? - and why?

I can certainly think of other boats that I would rate higher for offshore but (insert some saying about if wishes were horses).

If you have sailed either, what were the poor points offshore, or in swell? Or the good points? thanks
 

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Have sailed on neither but I'd go with Ericson 35 II given a choice...comparing the numbers of the boats..the Ericson is heavier, beamier, likley more stable and stiffer...will likely carry a bit more in terms of supplies...also likely the drier boat of the two ...but not having been on either...this isn't a qualified opinion naturally...On paper ...offshore, I'd wanna be on the Ericson...
 

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Hull to Deck Joint is glassed over on the inside on the Ericson. This is a Good Thing.
I do not know how the Ranger Yacht is held together, but like the Ericson, it was designed by another great NA.

The Ericson would have a better interior in some ways. There is an SF owner at the EY site that has done a solo transpac on his E-35/2, FWIW.

Same question has come up a few years ago over at the owners' site, EricsonYachts.org: The Starting Point on Ericson Yachts!.

You might want to pose your question over at that site.

Best,
LB
 

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Learning the HARD way...
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I suggest a PM to treilley. He owned a beautiful Ericson 35-2, and rebuilt just about every system aboard. He is (was) also very active on the Ericson Owner's Group.
 
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Another nod for the Ericson. The Mull Rangers are pretty good boats, but my sense is that the Ericsons are a notch or two up on build quality. Something inherently 'rugged' without being heavy or slow with those older Ericsons, esp that classic.
 

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I suggest a PM to treilley. He owned a beautiful Ericson 35-2, and rebuilt just about every system aboard. He is (was) also very active on the Ericson Owner's Group.
Actually, his was the 80's Ericson 35-3. Different hull entirely. One of the nicest updated ones I have heard of anywhere. :)

L
 

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MY dock mate sailed his (35-2) from Mexico to Hawaii then back to the west coast via Oregon down the coast to Channel Islands CA. He loved it. He takes it to Mexico in the fall and returns some time in the Spring. He has been doing this for years. His was built in 1981. Now I don't know if this says more about him or his boat. He is a great sailor.
Brad
His name is Mike, his boat's name is Bodhisattiva.
 

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Learning the HARD way...
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Low Salt Diet Sufferer
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
MY dock mate sailed his (35-2) from Mexico to Hawaii then back to the west coast via Oregon down the coast to Channel Islands CA. He loved it. He takes it to Mexico in the fall and returns some time in the Spring. He has been doing this for years. His was built in 1981. Now I don't know if this says more about him or his boat. He is a great sailor.
Brad
His name is Mike, his boat's name is Bodhisattiva.
Bradhamlet... you owe Mike a beer! Bodhisattiva is a C&C 35 Landfall. Take him a beer and confirm I'm right... if I'm wrong then I owe you a beer.

I'd agree Mike is a great sailor, and a great guy.

I think the boat next to his is an Ericson, but I'm not sure if it is a 35-2 or 35-3
 

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The numbers look so close they are probably irrelevant. I have a 1976 Ranger 33 that I may take offshore in the future. I like how narrow it is for capsize resistance. I like the bronze through hulls, 0.5"+ thick solid hull, 1.5" thick plywood cored deck, good light air performance, moderate keel, and overall good behavior. However, I have it on a lake so can't comment on offshore abilities. Others have definitely gone from CA to HI and other offshore passages. What concerns me for offshore are: no bridgedeck, narrow sidedecks, limited storage compared to beamier boats (but I'll take lower capsize risk over storage!) and the fact that mine leaks, but I blame that mostly on previous owners not Ranger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I'd think the Ranger 33 might be a good downwind boat, both in speed and tracking. What have your experiences been?

Down wind tracking with quartering seas would seem to be pretty important out in the blue, and the area I wonder most about the Ericson 35-2. But again I've sailed neither.
 

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I think you're right the downwind speed and tracking are important, but having only sailed the boat one season and a bit this year (I got a late start after putting in an electric motor) in a bay where I'm tacking and turning so much I don't notice tracking, I don't feel I can really comment. If I get a chance to try and take note of that soon I will.
 

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Ericson 35 is a solid citizen, albeit a little tender. We sail mostly in LA area, and although winds are fairly light we usually sail with one or two reefs tied in, just to make life easier. More main just tries to bury the rail, without a lot of extra push.
I'm sure there are those who will disagree, and that is what makes forums fun.
CTS: what's all this about SailNet going out of business? I just joined up.
The discussion about that is pretty old, but it seems like forms are still in business. Old news?
 

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Still no significant downwind experience to report, but I was surprised to find out yesterday that the R33 heaves-to fairly nicely. An inexperienced friend and I had set out early in light wind to beat into it for the better part of a day (after spending the night rolling in the waves at anchor.) We had an 180% genoa on that became too much as the apparent wind probably rose above 15 knots, and the waves averaged 2-3 feet with many around 4 feet. She lost control a couple of times, and the boat hove-to with a very calm motion, drifting at a knot or two straight downwind. The rudder appeared to do nothing in this condition (it was easy to get back to regular sailing by switching the jib to the downwind side.) The only problem is I think it lay beam to the seas. That could hopefully be changed with a different set of sails to change the balance, or different sheeting. We later switched to the storm jib, a process on the bow that made me seasick, and I also accidentally hove-to with that one, and it was also stable and calm hove-to with that combination. I didn't note the angle to the waves, but think it was about beam to as well, which isn't good because I'd think the full main and a storm jib might angle into the wind more. I probably won't have a downwind update for you this year, since we also managed to find some rocks with the keel and let in a little water. The boat got hauled today - I haven't seen the damage yet :(
 

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Have sailed on neither but I'd go with Ericson 35 II given a choice...comparing the numbers of the boats..the Ericson is heavier, beamier, likley more stable and stiffer...will likely carry a bit more in terms of supplies...also likely the drier boat of the two ...but not having been on either...this isn't a qualified opinion naturally...On paper ...offshore, I'd wanna be on the Ericson...
I ran the two boats on the comparison calculator here :

Sail Calculator Pro v3.53 - 2500+ boats

They are surprisingly similar (identical even) on all counts except displacement to length, which is lower on the Ranger.
 
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