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Discussion Starter #1
Not including electronics, safety gear or engine rebuild what could it cost ballpark to rebuild a Vega 27 if all you have is a stripped hull . Mast, sheets, winches, sails, stanchions, lifelines etc. ?
 

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An arm, a leg and probably a kidney. That is a very hard question to answer because there are too many variables. If you do a quality job it will always cost more than if you went out and bought a used one in good condition. The only real advantage is that you can design it exactly how YOU want it. As far as a cost saving thing this would not be it. There are a lot of good used boats out there that you could get into inexpensively and come out way ahead.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yeah was offered a boat my friend has sitting in a yard that the owner just wants gone so i was considering it as a 3-4 year project. Have a close ( mechanic)friend that will rebuild the motor with me. Just trying to get an idea.
 

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I love the Vega. That being said your best off to spend the cash for one with an interior.
They can be had for under $10,000 in very nice shape, with a good running diesel.
If you like the rambo look, you could do it yourself for several thousand.
Budget $4500 for the engine, $2500 for new sails, $1500 for rigging, 3500 for everything else.
 

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Roughly 3 to 4 times what it will be worth when you're done. It's not a scientifically tested theory, because only 2 people in history have ever actually completed a rebuild like this. :)

Although, they both sold their boats and never sailed again.
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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As others have said there is a big difference in cost between simply putting one into sailing shape for day sailing and weekending, vs putting one into a condition where it can be reilably counted on for distance cruising. The other piece of the equation is finding a source for used gear vs new gear. And lastly, the cost depends on skilled, knowledgable and willing you are at being able to do your own work.

Without knowing how much is in the boat and how much is missing, you can figure as a total round number price for everything new and done right by professionals something like the following (with labor being roughly half of that):
New mast, spreaders, boom, running and standing rigging: $10,000
Sails (main, jib, genoa): $8,000
New deck Hardware: $5,000
Materials to repair and refinish the hull and interior, rebed the hardware, (assumes paint, caulk, barrier coat, varnish, some bulkhead repairs) : $4,000-$7,000
Upholstery: $4,000
Plumbing: $1000
Ground tackle, docklines, and operating gear: $1000
Electrical: $2000
Shaft and seal maintenance: $300
Bottom paint: $1,000

In other words, competitively sourcing the work, the just 'write a check approach' will cost somewhere around the mid $30K range to put one a condition approaching 'like new' not including electronics and the engine rebuild.

If you did the work yourself, (and did not value your time) you would save the cost of the labor (roughly 50%), and profit (roughly 10%), but because you are not in the industry, you will pay 20-50% more for the materials (depending on the item) than a professional.

In terms of labor, you might be able to do the work in three years if you were focused, had a place to store the boat out of the weather, and were dilligent enough to work almost every weekend day and most evenings.

Of course if you can find a decent used spar, and decent used sails, and find good sources for used hardware, did not care about aethetics and so on, you might do for as little as $10-15K, but I would not count on that.
(And yes I know that Vegas have done some remarkable voyages, but Vega's are like what most knowledgeable sailors say about Slocum and Spray, i.e. Slocum made it around the world despite Spray's limitations rather than because she was such a great boat. If you have ever sailed a Vega you would understand.)

And whether you chose to spent $35K or $10K or somewhere in between, you would end up with way more invested than than she will be worth in what was a very mediocre design when she was drawn 50 years ago. You would be very far ahead of the game taking a $10,000 budget and buying a good used Vega, or better yet fully equipped and fully operable boat of a better build and design quality.

Respectfully,
Jeff
 

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It really depends, if you are one who likes to work on project then it might happen. Some people seem to be tinkerers while others like to sail. I know of people who will compleat a project sail it for a few years then find a "better" project and start over. Others just like to sail. No real right way. Only do it though if you are one to really finish projects. Do you have a car in the driveway that you have not gotten around to finishing?

That said it is likely worth more as scrap. Most yards cut them up and sell the parts. As far as cost to rebuild truly depends on the quality you want, and your skills without touching the motor I think $10,000 sounds about right if you do everything yourself and keep it simple. About 4 times that if you pay for labor. Add in 3,000 for parts if a freind is doing motor and if it can't be rebuilt then another 15,000. That is why you see so many with outboards.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Just tempting when there is a free boat. I was only really curious. My boat will keep me happy for now until I buy something bigger however I do not think the AV 27 would be big enough inside.
 

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Just tempting when there is a free boat. I was only really curious. My boat will keep me happy for now until I buy something bigger however I do not think the AV 27 would be big enough inside.
The old, I will give you my boat for free trick. Usually because that's more than its worth.
 

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Just tempting when there is a free boat. I was only really curious. My boat will keep me happy for now until I buy something bigger however I do not think the AV 27 would be big enough inside.
More likely, the boat will suck you dry and become a hindrance to buying the boat that you really want.

Walk away. Save your money for a boat you actually want.

Most free boats are worth less than you paid for them.

In the vast majority of cases, you are better off buying a boat in sail-away condition. Let the previous owner take the loss on doing the upgrades.
 

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Over Hill Sailing Club
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I think Jeff is very close on his estimate. If anything he's a bit low. But, if you do the work yourself, you can cut that down a bit, to maybe 25K. Your major unavoidable cost will be the rigging and spars. There are used spars that can be adapted if you do the research to see what the specs need to be and you're good with metal work. Without knowing more details, it's hard to be very specific. The big plus about a project such as this is that when you are done, you're starting the lifespans of new gear from zero. But you really have to like doing the work. If you don't have the skills and the motivation to realistically estimate the work, it's probably not a good idea. A project boat is enjoyable if the project is the objective more than the sailing. If you want a sailboat to sail first and foremost as the objective, buy one that may need a bit of sprucing up, not one requiring a major re-build.

Refitting my A35 has cost 30K, including new electronics, etc. But I did not need an interior rebuild nor did I need new sails.
 
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