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Discussion Starter #1
We're getting ready to rebed our chainplates using MaineSail's butyl tape. We've read his very detailed and helpful instructions, but were wondering if we need to use epoxy to seal the face of the deck core in the slot that the chainplate goes through? Although we had slight water seepage which is what prodded us to look into this to begin with, there is no real sign of rotting in the core (we've already opened it up down below to check where the chainplates are bolted in place). Is that the determining factor in using epoxy versus not?

Given the time delays with epoxy and the difficulty in getting several consecutive days without rain around here lately, we would obviously prefer not to have to use it. However, we also want to make sure we're doing this right.

Thanks.
 

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Exposed core between tthe lams?
Absolutely!

Yanno,there *are* "fast" versions of epoxy available, doncha? ;) Of course "fast" is rather subjective; but ya get the picture. I have some twin-tubes of 5 minute that I wouldn't trust to that job, but also have some "one hour"that just might suit? I think West Systems hassome thickened stuff that freputed to be *quick* ??
 

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Discussion Starter #3
We read a blog where someone used West 105 epoxy resin and West 295 hardener. The West fact sheet says 60-70 minutes for a working time, thin film, 6-8 hours for a solid, thin film, and 1-4 days for cure to working strength.

I thought we had to wait for the cure to working strength before we could reinsert the chainplates (after using the butyl, of course). Is that not the case? That would certainly make a big difference.
 

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I think you have it backwards. Thin films take longer to cure since they don't build up much heat. A big batch of epoxy can kick before you even have a chance to use it if you aren't careful, as the exoteric reaction heats the stuff up.

Standard cure epoxy for bedding I typically apply one day, then drill the next. A slow hardener on a cold day could take longer. A fast one could take just a few minutes.
 
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