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First String
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm going to buy a new radio, but I want one with the AIS onboard.
the Standard Horizon 2150 has ASI but you have to wire it to nthe Garmin for its GPS signal.
Now, the Newer GX2200 has the first on a kind own gps so its a stand alone usnt? What do you reccomendation?
the reason i want it is for my training offshore. I will be sailing in the savannah to Charleston area and I want to use as an Aid to navagation to help me be safer.
thanks for your input.

LT
 

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If you can afford the 2200, I would get it. After all, it's an extra backup GPS - more redundancy is better. Looks like the main reason to buy a 2150 would be to save $100 if you already have a GPS.

NB - if you have a compatible chartplotter, you would want to wire it up anyway, as you would see AIS targets on the plotter screen. Very useful.
 

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First String
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If you can afford the 2200, I would get it. After all, it's an extra backup GPS - more redundancy is better. Looks like the main reason to buy a 2150 would be to save $100 if you already have a GPS.

NB - if you have a compatible chartplotter, you would want to wire it up anyway, as you would see AIS targets on the plotter screen. Very useful.
Yea, the reason I picked the MATRIX AIS/GPS GX2200 is it has the GPS in it. And the other it that it was compatible with my Garmin Echo50-S

I'm trying to outfit the boat to be as safe as I know how. I do not have a lifeboat. My pull behind and 5.5 hp will have to do for this year. I need to buy a life-sling still.
This sailing stuff is so expensive. you got to pace your self.\
 

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Learning the HARD way...
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Both Standard Horizon units are AIS receivers, but not transceivers. What this means is that you can see the ships, but they cannot see you. Also, I find it hard to believe that these are NMEA 0183 ONLY. While NMEA 0183 is OK for now, I would want N2K capability...

I would look at the Vesper Marine Watchmate WMX850 or the iCom MA500.
 

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First String
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868 Posts
Now with an Integrated 66 Channel GPS receiver and two integrated AIS receivers getting connected has never been easier. Having a VHF with DSC and integrated AIS/GPS provides REAL piece of mind in high traffic areas.

Integrated 66 Channel WAAS GPS antenna
Integrated dual channel AIS (Automatic Identification System) receiver
AIS / AIS SART target display: MMSI, Call Sign, Ship Name, BRG, DST, SOG and COG
4800 or 38400 NMEA baud rate selection, for plotters with 1 NMEA port
True and Magnetic bearing selection on AIS display
Contact Class A or B AIS Ship with DSC
Programmable CPA or TCPA collision avoidance alarms
Meets ITU-R M493-13 Class D DSC (Digital Selective Calling)
Submersible IPX7 (3.3 feet or 1 meter for 30 minutes) front panel
80dB Commercial grade receiver
DSC position request and report functions
30 Watt PA/Loud Hailer with preprogrammed fog signals and listen back
ClearVoice noise canceling speaker microphone with channel selection and 16/9 key
GPS Compass, Waypoint and GPS status pages
Navigation (LAT/LON, Time, SOG and COG) information shown on display
Enter, Save and Navigate to waypoints with Compass page
E2O (Easy-To-Operate) menu system
User customizable soft keys for easy menu operation
Versatile user-programmable scanning, priority scan and Dual Watch
Oversized rotary channel knob with push to enter, backlit display and keys
Local/Distance attenuator
Optional connection for RAM3 second station remote microphone with AIS display
Intercom between radio and RAM3
Voice Scrambler (optional)
 

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Hey,

IMHO, if you have a modern chart plotter you should connect the VHF and Plotter together. The reason is that the AIS display on the VHF is very limited. The screen is small and it's difficult to figure out which ships are where. If the VHF and plotter are connected, the AIS information will be displayed on the plotter. The plotter will display the ship name, speed, COG, etc.

Where are you going to mount the VHF? If it's below, then you will need a remote mic to have at the cockpit so you can see the AIS information, and that screen is even smaller than the one on the radio.

It's pretty simple to connect the two devices.

If you have an NMEA 2000 network, Lowrance, Simrad, and ICOM make VHF / AIS receivers that use NMEA 2000.

Barry
 

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First String
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868 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hey Berry,
I was thinking of hooking them together for sure. I'm just not sure how to do what I was thinking I wanted.
I want to see the traffic at the helm on the face of my Garmin echo 50s. I will need to connect the to units together. But I would like the separate GPS units to be functional. The radio's gps and the Garmin. If on fails to operate I will still have all the important information.

Here is my reason: Say I have a heart attack or what ever, my wife can be at the radio in the cabin and give the coast guard or a commercial ship my COG, SOG, Lon,Lat, and also be able to see the nearest AIS equiped boat with its information "name speed, direction ect. Now if she had to run back and forth from the helm for this information it would be a bad thing.


What i'm not sure of if I have to disable the radio's GPS when hooking to the Garmin? Of do they still use both.
 

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Learning the HARD way...
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I couldn't read the highlighting in yellow, until I selected it..
4800 or 38400 NMEA baud rate selection, for plotters with 1 NMEA port
English translation: NMEA 0183
 

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Hello,

I don't think you can have both GPS units sending location information. I believe that would confuse one or both units.

My point is that for most boats, the built in GPS of the GX2200 isn't that useful. You will want to connect the VHF and chart plotter together, and if you do that, the VHF will get GPS information from the plotter. Of course if you don't have a plotter, then the GPS in the SHGX2200 will be great because you can take advantage of all the DSC functions, including emergency calls.

Lastly, if you have a heart attack, fall off the boat, etc, your wife should stop the boat, and press the red 'emergency' button on the VHF. Since you obtained an MMSI number (RIGHT?) and programmed that into the radio, the Coast Guard will know that YOUR BOAT has a problem, and the LOCATION of your boat.

Barry
 

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Rather then invest in an AIS receiver I would be looking at an AIS transceiver that can both transmit my details to other AIS equipped vessels and receive AIS signals from surrounding boats.

I don't believe any current VHF radio functions includes an AIS transceiver.

I would look at one of the Vesper AIS transceiver units.

GPS on the radio mounted below would likely require a separate GPS antenna mounted topsides. Not much different from having the radio linked to a separate GPS signal over NMEA 2000 or even NMEA183. On a VHF radio with NMEA2000 the optional antenna would likely be connected to the radio via NMEA 2000. If multiple GPS signals existed on a NMEA 2000 network you should be able select the GPS source you would want to use.

Radio should have DSC and you should have a MMSI to enter into it.

For a handheld radio, built in GPS/DSC would seem to be useful as most of time (on deck, in the dinghy, etc) the GPS would have clear line of site to the GPS satellites.

Regards
Marc Hall
Crazy Fish - Maintaining, Upgrading and Sailing a Crealock 37
 

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Plainly put, Icom makes the best radios. They are more expensive for a reason. I wouldn't put my money into any radio made by any other manufacturer.
 
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lt-
I'd also prefer an AIS transceiver to just a receiver. Other than that I'd agree with Mark, and go for the integrated unit. With separate units there are always cables to fail, configurations to be matched...nothing insurmountable but "integrated" is a nice way to go, and a GPS receiver is just a $5 chip these days, making it integral to a radio is just a question of "How much do we want to charge for convenience?"
 
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