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We're extremely happy with our Sea Eagle kayak. If you go that route, spring for the "deluxe" seats.

When deflated it fits easily into a cockpit locker.
 

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From what I hear 'Advanced Elements' makes a good inflatable kayak. I know they make one of the best solar shower bags, at least.
 

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Advanced Elements are about as good as they get. In Seattle you can sometimes find returned one at REI (returns area in the basement, or the semi-annual garage sale) for a good deal.

I have a single person one that I carried as a second dinghy last year. I plan on selling this one shortly on CL (which is also where I found it). It worked pretty well, paddled about as well as an inflatable dinghy rows (which isn't great) but not nearly as well as a real kayak does. The longer and more expensive Advanced Elements kayaks look better, this one was one of their shortest and cheapest models.
 

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I worry about entering a kayak from the sailboat. Saturn makes something called a kaboat which is a cross between a kayak and a dinghy. Might be easier to enter from sailboat....not sure how well it will paddle compared to the inflatable kayak.
 

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Matthew,

If you scroll down to the bottom of the page to Similar Threads there are more threads about inflatable kayaks you might want to check out.
 

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Swab
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If you are into kayaking, THIS is a far better idea than an inflatable. We are seriously considering them as a replacement for our old inflatable kayak.

The inflatable has been working out OK, but inflatable kayaks just do not perform well enough for my tastes. In my opinion, the only advantage of inflatables is that they are easy to store. The Oru Yak gives the performance of a hard shell with the compact storage capability of an inflatable.
 

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I've had the Sea Eagle 370FT for several years now and used it quite a bit. Strictly as a tender would rate it very good--stiff floor, tracks well enough, handles chop well, stores well on side deck(of my Tartan 30) inflated. Pretty good only as true kayak-no sea kayak. Can make progress upstream in moderate current but at about 50% more energy than true sea kayak. Enjoyable downsteam.
 

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Check this guy out. I have bought from him.

I got the seaeagle paddle ski from Tim which is like a cross between a hobbie and a rib.

I'll tell you more about it if you are interested.

Same or better deal than what sea eagle corporate offers but nice old guy can guide you into the right boat for your needs.
 

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The inflatable has been working out OK, but inflatable kayaks just do not perform well enough for my tastes. In my opinion, the only advantage of inflatables is that they are easy to store. The Oru Yak gives the performance of a hard shell with the compact storage capability of an inflatable.
Have you paddled one? What hard kayaks can you compare it to? I'd be interested in how it compares to other short kayaks like the Dagger Alchemy. How is the cockpit outfitting? Are there knee braces and foot braces that work well?

It looks like it assembles much more quickly than the Feathercraft K-Light that I used to have. The back of the cockpit looks a little high compared to the Greenland-style kayaks that I'm used to, and it may not roll as easily. It still looks like it could be the best compromise for a sailboat kayak. I just wish I could find reviews from real kayakers instead of technology blogs.
 

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If you are into kayaking, THIS is a far better idea than an inflatable. We are seriously considering them as a replacement for our old inflatable kayak.

The inflatable has been working out OK, but inflatable kayaks just do not perform well enough for my tastes. In my opinion, the only advantage of inflatables is that they are easy to store. The Oru Yak gives the performance of a hard shell with the compact storage capability of an inflatable.
That looks like a great compromise between soft and hard kayaks. (twice the price, thought, of a typical plastic)

Definitely a performance/effort difference between the two types. We once went on a flotilla paddle, a half dozen 10 foot plastics, and one inflatable which a very fit paddler took on... He returned early, tired by the effort required compared to those of us in the hard kayaks.
 

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Swab
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Have you paddled one? What hard kayaks can you compare it to? .
My paddling experience is limited to Australian and South African style surf rescue/racing skis, K1s OC Scuppers and the one inflatable we bought to bring with us in the boat. Performance wise, inflatables are a poor substitute for the kind of speed and manuverability I am used to.

I'd be interested in how it compares to other short kayaks like the Dagger Alchemy. .
Me too. I am dying to try the Omu Kayak but the opportunities for demos are limited where I am at the moment. Heading for the Seattle Area in a few days so maybe I can get more info there.
 

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Swab
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I have to say as a cruiser with an aversion to having stuff tied to lifelines the Oru origami Kayak looks pretty appealing.
I know what you mean. You will never see our boat with fuel jugs, kayaks, windsurfers and other assorted junk lashed to the lifelines and looking like a gypsy wagon. It is just unseamanlike and dangerous.

We left the deflatable pumped up and on deck just once for a short hop between anchorages in calm water. Never again.
 

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Another thought is a whitewater kayak. I keep an 8' Dagger steep creek boat right in the forward berth so it does not have to be up on deck. It IS difficult to get into and out of from the boat but with the skirt on it will go through about anything. Being a "floater" with plenty of volume rather than a "sinker" it also is quite fast. There is no storage to speak of so it's not much good to go get groceries but it is good for getting into interesting places. I also have a small RIB which is my main dink.
 

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For those who have difficulty getting into and out of these various kayaks, a trick that's worked well for my wife is to pull up to the stern ladder, get one foot over the side and step on first underwater step. Reach out and grab an upper rung and basically pull yourself out of the kayak up onto the ladder without having to 'balance' in the kayak itself.

Getting in can be a reversal, though generally getting in off the ladder seems to present less difficulty.
 
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For those who have difficulty getting into and out of these various kayaks, a trick that's worked well for my wife is to pull up to the stern ladder, get one foot over the side and step on first underwater step. Reach out and grab an upper rung and basically pull yourself out of the kayak up onto the ladder without having to 'balance' in the kayak itself.

Getting in can be a reversal, though generally getting in off the ladder seems to present less difficulty.
I do something similar.

It helps when John doesn't get off first and set me adrift without the paddles. I learned quickly to be the one to deal with the paddles if I'm last off. I also now keep a line tide to the stern of the boat so I can tie it to the kayak when we pull up to the ladder. Just to be sure.
 

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Over Hill Sailing Club
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For those who have difficulty getting into and out of these various kayaks, a trick that's worked well for my wife is to pull up to the stern ladder, get one foot over the side and step on first underwater step. Reach out and grab an upper rung and basically pull yourself out of the kayak up onto the ladder without having to 'balance' in the kayak itself.

Getting in can be a reversal, though generally getting in off the ladder seems to present less difficulty.
Yes, gravity is with you going down:) Not so getting out. I took the tight hip pads out of mine to make it easier. I also took out the foot brace. Going into docks and finding a place to get out can be a challenge if there's no convenient beach. There's no graceful way to get out at a dock! It would be really great to have a sea kayak aboard. I have one but it's 18' long. I agree that keeping things like that on deck is verboten.
 
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