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Discussion Starter #1
As like most of you do I'm sure, I run my reefing lines from the boom through a cringle on the leach of the main and then back to a block/sheave on the boom (in my case built into the aft end), and then forward to the mast. But why don't we just tie the reefing line to the cringle with a buntline knot and run it to the block/sheave in the mast? We'd have much less weight aloft. I'm sure there is a reason, but what?

Thoughts? Thanks.

Regards,
Ron
 

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By starting at the boom you create a simple, (albeit high friction) 2 part tackle that makes it easier to properly tighten the clew when you reef. The extra power overcomes the friction and you end up with better purchase. It makes a significant difference.. pulling the clew down and out would be nearly twice as difficult with your suggested change.
 

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Two things.
1. The line going up then back down again gives you a two to one leverage in pulling down the sail.
2. Once the sail in reefed, pulled down their are two directions is is being pulled. Typically down and back. It is a good thing to pull the sail down of course but it is important to pull it back to tension the foot.

Now I've got one for you.
Why does the reefing line go back to the mast? Why not just cleat it off at the end of the boom? Would save even more line.

Hint. Think about when you might have to reef.
 

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Having your clews reefing line run from the outboard end of your boom up to a reefing point on the sail and back down to the boom does give you a bit of a purchase, it will also give you a more centred attachment point when reefed. As opposed to one side of the boom or the other it is pulling from both sides.
Also we normally reef our sails way to late, so having it run forward toward the mast give you a safer and easier place to reef from.
Running it to the cockpit is even better.
 

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.......Now I've got one for you.
Why does the reefing line go back to the mast? Why not just cleat it off at the end of the boom? Would save even more line.......
Having a Socratic moment, David?? ;)
 
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Having a Socratic moment, David?? ;)
Exactly.
I figured if he was asking his question he might as well keep going and puzzle out a few more things in the same vein.
Maybe its that ASA instructor cert burning a hole on my pocket that I didn't get a chance to use all summer.

A little overkill on SailNet yes!!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I go to the mast to reef as I have my main halyard there (going through a clutch) to the main halyard winch, and I have my reefing line lead there also through clutches to a winch as well. I once had the lines lead to the cockpit and hated it. Something always got snagged or twisted, so I ended up leaving the cockpit anyway to straighten things out. I also use a Strong Track which allows me to reef off the wind as long as the main is not on the spreaders. I can reef on a reach by loosening the main halyard and pulling down the main hand over hand. This is a lot better than trying to go to windward in a seaway.
 

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Now I've got one for you.
Why does the reefing line go back to the mast? Why not just cleat it off at the end of the boom? Would save even more line.
Here is a guy trying to reef with the line terminating at the clew end of boom (not really):

 

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Heh heh... I can hear it now.. Moments after sailing straight onto the beach under full sail, he says... 'quick, jump in and start scrubbing... it'll look like we did this on purpose!' ;)



 

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Have low friction blocks and no stretch lines for reefing as first two reefs are single line. Still use old school tech running line up from boom then down to end of boom then forward then to cockpit through line organizer. Main reason is it allows you to shape the sail. Your only two variables are halyard tension and tension on clew. Sometimes you actually don't want the flattest sail although you do want to be reefed. For instance when powering through a head sea to get off a coast You need power in the sail but when wind speed is up don't want to be on your ear. Simple way to get this is fairly tight tack and halyard but a little looser on the clew. Sometimes pull down sail but not tight to boom as may get better shape and ability to play with it that way. It's easy to do this with Dutchman system. One of the disadvantages of in boom furling is inability to shape main at all when reefing except for halyard tension and a bit from vang and traveler.
 

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Having your clews reefing line run from the outboard end of your boom up to a reefing point on the sail and back down to the boom does give you a bit of a purchase, it will also give you a more centred attachment point when reefed. As opposed to one side of the boom or the other it is pulling from both sides.
Are you suggesting the reef line goes from the end of the boom, through the clew and back to the end of the boom? If you are, that is definitely not ideal because that setup will not get the clew down to the boom (pulls only aft not down).

Also we normally reef our sails way to late, so having it run forward toward the mast give you a safer and easier place to reef from.
Running it to the mast is essential if you want to reef when off the wind, else how do you get to the end of (or even halfway down) the boom when it's out there over the water?

Running it to the cockpit is even better.
Running a reefing line to the cockpit only helps if you have a single line reefing setup (many arguments for and against on this forum) because if you don't, you have to go to the mast anyway to get the luff down and secured. ;)
 
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