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As you can see with the photo I've added above of my Main/Mast/Boom, the spacing is a little funny. The luff cringle slug is fairly close to the batten slug above, but if the cringle slug was removed the above batten slug would be further from the next down slug than any of the other slug spacing. I'm not sure if it would be a problem to just remove that slug or if I need to relocate it below the cringle, centered between the above and below slugs.
No problem. That slug in the cringle is not needed. You may find the sail easier to raise and lower if you removed half of the intermediate slugs all the way up. There are more there than necessary - with full battens, intermediate slugs serve more to keep those parts of the sail from billowing away when raising/lowering than actually contributing to the sail integrity on the mast. If none existed at all, there would be no difference in sail shape or performance (assuming your bolt rope was in good shape and handling the loads).

Let's say I have that luff cringle open, either because I just remove the slug or because I relocate it, what would be the best way to keep the reefing line on the starboard side of the boom leading to a block at the base of the mast and leading to the starboard cockpit? Would it be okay to have the reefing line only pulling down on the starboard side of the luff cringle (like through a D-Ring) opposed to pulling down on it more centrally (with the line going through the cringle)?
No problem with a D-ring or any other way that doesn't go through the cringle. Actually, running a line through a cringle is the worse way to set up the reefing - a lot of friction and potential to chafe. A low friction eye or block is better for single line reefing.

I looked up a dog bone and it is a loop with a toggle, kinda? I could slide that through the cringle and around the luff. It could then be used to hang an air block just a SS ring for the reefing line to go through?
Exactly. A dog bone is just a loop of webbing or dyneema fit through the cringle with a block or ring on the side you will reef from, and toggle on the other side to keep it from pulling through (often just another ring so you can use either side for the reef).

Here is the front block of our reef. On this sail, a loop of webbing was put through the cringle and sewn on both sides, but our previous sail just had a loop of webbing through the cringle with a ring on each side so it couldn't pull through, and the block was attached to the ring. It's a bad pic, but the cringle is at the top of the block with the webbing going through it.

Mark

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Discussion Starter #23
No problem. That slug in the cringle is not needed. You may find the sail easier to raise and lower if you removed half of the intermediate slugs all the way up. There are more there than necessary - with full battens, intermediate slugs serve more to keep those parts of the sail from billowing away when raising/lowering than actually contributing to the sail integrity on the mast. If none existed at all, there would be no difference in sail shape or performance (assuming your bolt rope was in good shape and handling the loads).



No problem with a D-ring or any other way that doesn't go through the cringle. Actually, running a line through a cringle is the worse way to set up the reefing - a lot of friction and potential to chafe. A low friction eye or block is better for single line reefing.



Exactly. A dog bone is just a loop of webbing or dyneema fit through the cringle with a block or ring on the side you will reef from, and toggle on the other side to keep it from pulling through (often just another ring so you can use either side for the reef).

Here is the front block of our reef. On this sail, a loop of webbing was put through the cringle and sewn on both sides, but our previous sail just had a loop of webbing through the cringle with a ring on each side so it couldn't pull through, and the block was attached to the ring. It's a bad pic, but the cringle is at the top of the block with the webbing going through it.

Mark

View attachment 136483
Mark, thank you very much for you reply. The information about how many slugs are needed is really helpful. It's good to have some confirmation that I can just remove the slug from the reef cringle. I may now also remove some of the intermediate slugs as I noticed raising the sail on a calm day while at the docked was 'sticky' and required some assistance at the mast to shake the luff a little.

I will go with a D-Ring, low-friction eye, or block for the luff reef. I think I remember there being an extra block hanging somewhere on the boat, too, which would be handy. Again, thanks for clearly answering all these newbie questions. Cheers
 

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I tighten halyard before the clew..loose vang
Clew is my last reef adjustment
Wrong...?
Do you pull up the halyard before pulling out the clew when the sail is not reefed?
 

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Yes
My thoughts are that everything follows the luff
So for those 3 points I tighten clew last
...then things below boom
Let me get this right, every time you drop your main, you slack the clew before you drop the sail? Then, when you want to go sailing, you hoist the sail and tighten the clew? I do believe this is the first time I've ever heard of anyone doing that.
 

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normal for me, never leave anything on a sail tight when you stow the sail. we loosen the mainsail clew and the jib halyard after use to take the tension off the sail. when we beach our cat we loosen the down haul to keep the main from flogging back and forth. stops the mast from rotating with the wind. tighten it again when we leave the beach
 

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I was talking about the sequence in reefng.
Tack..head..clew

Normally i do slack the outhaul after dropping the main
Well, it seems even at my age one can learn new things every day.
 

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I'm not at the boat to say right now, but I'm sure there would be a way to attach reefing hooks. I would then put a dyneema/d-ring spectacle through the cringle, hook it to the reef hook, and operate the line for the leech reef only? I don't think I would terribly mind having to go to the mast to hook that and then use one line for the leech reef. At that point I would consider running the leech reef line back from the forward boom cheek block to a cleat on the boom, eliminating the route down from the boom to the deck and back to the cockpit.
Just want to chime in that this sounds like the most sensible solution to me. If you're going to be at the mast anyway, may as well keep everything simple and low friction.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Just want to chime in that this sounds like the most sensible solution to me. If you're going to be at the mast anyway, may as well keep everything simple and low friction.
We installed a dog bone on the luff cringle and have the single line reefing all in place. It seems to work fine enough but we will have to mark the main sheet halyard to know where to stop it before pulling the reefing line tight. If we don't do that our dog bone can get pulled down all the way to the forward mast cheek block. When I get the chance I'm going to install a reefing hook and have the leech reefing line tie to a boom cleat, eliminating the run of line from the boom to the mast block to the cockpit clam cleat.

Thanks everyone for helping me figure this out. There are a number of things I've found that I will be doing to improve the rigging, but right now we are focusing on planning our trip from St. Helens to Portland in our new Cal 22! The electrical was kind of a mess. All ground wires where soldered into the side of the battery ground cable with some electrical tape covering it. No navigational lights were working. I spent Sunday rewiring all negatives to a buss bar and finding all the bad connections and repairing them. We have lights! Unfortunately the steaming light (our only light on the mast) has no continuity at the base of the mast, so we will have to access the light fixture which means getting up there or getting it done to us. None of us have experience with either, so that will be great learning adventures. If we drop the mast we will go ahead and add an anchoring light. I'm sure I'll have questions when we get to that task!

Cheers
 

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We installed a dog bone on the luff cringle and have the single line reefing all in place. It seems to work fine enough but we will have to mark the main sheet halyard to know where to stop it before pulling the reefing line tight. If we don't do that our dog bone can get pulled down all the way to the forward mast cheek block. When I get the chance I'm going to install a reefing hook and have the leech reefing line tie to a boom cleat, eliminating the run of line from the boom to the mast block to the cockpit clam cleat.
The reef line should be in place before tightening the halyard. Mark your reef line for this point - halyard too, they can work in tandem when visibility is bad. If you use a hook, you will need to go to the mast to reef, but I guess that's obvious.

Mark
 

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On all boats regardless of size the set up should pull the sail down but also slightly forward. That’s why at the other end you tie to the boom go up through the sail and back down to the end of the boom. Pulling slightly forward in the front and slightly aft in the back improves sail shape. With increased halyard tension chord moves forward and draft decreases. So beyond matters of durability getting a nice flat well shaped sail increases safety, increases speed and increases life of the sail.
would modify this set up and get it right. Short money and worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
On all boats regardless of size the set up should pull the sail down but also slightly forward. That’s why at the other end you tie to the boom go up through the sail and back down to the end of the boom. Pulling slightly forward in the front and slightly aft in the back improves sail shape. With increased halyard tension chord moves forward and draft decreases. So beyond matters of durability getting a nice flat well shaped sail increases safety, increases speed and increases life of the sail.
would modify this set up and get it right. Short money and worth it.
Yes, when I get the chance I plan to install a reefing hook. Right now with the dog bone being pulled directly down toward the cheek block I am getting pretty good tension on the foot, but I know it will be improved having a more fixed point for the tack.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
The reef line should be in place before tightening the halyard. Mark your reef line for this point - halyard too, they can work in tandem when visibility is bad. If you use a hook, you will need to go to the mast to reef, but I guess that's obvious.

Mark
After I set it up and was trying it out, I found that I had to use the reefing line and halyard in tandem to get the reef point (dog bone) as close to the boom as I could without pulling it all the way to the cheek block on the boom. So marking both lines would be helpful. Next time I'm at the boat I will look into placing a track stop low on the mast so that when the slugs are dropped (reefed), they will stack at the right point to predetermine where the reef point can be pulled to by the reefing line. I'll take some photos too :)
I'm excited to bring this boat upriver so it is nearby for me to tinker with and SAIL!
 
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