SailNet Community banner
241 - 260 of 301 Posts

·
al brazzi
Joined
·
2,089 Posts
Those photos are impressive! What a massive project. And unless I missed something, I don't think it involved any major structural repairs to the hull. In my experience, that's what you can expect from a reasonably well built 50 year old fiberglass hull.

In contrast, the wooden boats of this vintage often have had-or now need-structural rebuilding.

But when all is said and done, the rebuild you posted is a major project both in time(massive)and $ investment. And the results as we see in these photos, are well worth it.
These are truly beautiful examples. I just realized why I hate(d) gloss finishes, its because if its not done like this why bother. Better off with something that doesn't show the imperfections of old refinished stuff or just the glopping on of shiny varnish.
 

·
Old enough to know better
Joined
·
4,346 Posts
I picked up some of my ideas from the wooden boat pros in my harbor, on how to treat my- now 54 year old- fiberglass CCA era yawl.

Gel coat is a faint memory on boats of this age(many owners are in denial,...). For some old boats, that will mark a cross road in it's future(or lack of). A professional glass topsides paint job with state of the art coatings is a big investment. In some cases(and these casing are growing), more than the value of the boat. Skilled labor $ is headed to the moon(I'm in the home design/build field and witness the rise daily).

The wooden boats nearby that I've been studying for a couple of decades, have a different way of treating topsides. Even modestly maintained wooden boats get a brush applied coat of paint fairly regularly. That's because a 'coat of paint' is easy and cheap both in cost and time.

The carte blanche woodies I photograph get a more involved 'coat of paint'. There's an ongoing fairing program that simply seals topsides seams and new dings. That takes a bit of time, but it's nothing in $ compared to the typical 'awlgrip' investment of a glass boat that's gelcoat has seen it's last wax job. In fact, I've watched the pros brush(not even roll and tip) apply a finish coat to a 40'er in about 5-6 hours, with a resulting quality, that is simply unbelievable!

So I've picked up the wooden boat topsides treatment for my old glass hull. No, I don't get anywhere near the quality of these wooden boats. But my process of staging, light sanding with an orbital sander, taping-a roll and tip coat of single part enamel, is a relatively easy 2 day system. The actual coating takes about 4 hours(I actually enjoy it painting with a brush) and 2 quarts of paint.

I get 3 years out of the coating. I could improve the result and duration with better prep, better skill and a two part paint. But I will never forget the nightmare of removing the failing awlgrip from my hull 15 years ago(never! but that's a different post altogether).

So while I don't think there is much needed for these old hulls in structure, even 50 years on, I do think 'cosmetics' will send some hulls to the landfill that might be saved by this 'wooden boat' process of painting.



Sounds like the process I plan on using this spring. I was watching a Jamestown video and could not help wonder what kind of finish he was going to get on his wooden boat.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXJxnDKleG0

What paint do you use?
 

·
it's a long story
Joined
·
33 Posts
Those photos are impressive! What a massive project. And unless I missed something, I don't think it involved any major structural repairs to the hull. In my experience, that's what you can expect from a reasonably well built 50 year old fiberglass hull.

In contrast, the wooden boats of this vintage often have had-or now need-structural rebuilding.

But when all is said and done, the rebuild you posted is a major project both in time(massive)and $ investment. And the results as we see in these photos, are well worth it.
Somewhere in the links there is a note from the builder commenting on how there was no structural repair needed and he commented on how thick the hull was when he pulled out a through-hull. (You won't find 'em built like that anymore.) The boat has been made like new again. How much would it cost to build one of those new? Your Columbia 50 is of a similar vintage and same practice of many hand laid up layers of fiberglass I believe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
966 Posts
Sounds like the process I plan on using this spring. I was watching a Jamestown video and could not help wonder what kind of finish he was going to get on his wooden boat.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXJxnDKleG0

What paint do you use?
Great video, I just skimmed it but will watch it when I have more time. I've watched pros like this work and learned a lot more than I could trial and error. He will get an unbelievable finish from just brushing, he has the knack. With the major fairing job over, a seasonal or bi-seasonal top coat is an easy job(for him).


I've been using Petit Easypoxy. It works pretty well but I'd use another one part oil enamel, like Brightside, if it was on the shelf. I can't get the same result as the wooden boat with the ladder photo I posted but the finish I get makes me happy. Truth is, my old glass hull is not that fair and would need lots more work for a perfect surface. For that reason, I've mixed a quart of high gloss with a quart of semi gloss. That is a bit more forgiving and glossy enough for my eye.

Our boat takes a beating with kids and dinghys, raft ups, etc. Not expecting more than a few years out of each coating, I'm not that worried about the abuse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
I've used the Interlux Perfection product and its absolutely fantastic. Stunning results on my 50 year old Vanguard. Very hard to tell it was not sprayed. The prep the first year was a bear, but the results were awesome-and that was Flag blue over a previously white hull with a grey primekote. That was six or seven years ago. I have painted it once since with similar results and the prep is easy after all of the first year prep. In my experience (and with my docking skills) the paint holds up very well. In fact, if not for the occasional scrape, I would not need to repaint. The paint is very durable. It's fussy to thin, but done once it's easy. I actually look forward to repainting-its that easy
 

·
it's a long story
Joined
·
33 Posts
I've used the Interlux Perfection product and its absolutely fantastic. Stunning results on my 50 year old Vanguard. Very hard to tell it was not sprayed. The prep the first year was a bear, but the results were awesome-and that was Flag blue over a previously white hull with a grey primekote. That was six or seven years ago. I have painted it once since with similar results and the prep is easy after all of the first year prep. In my experience (and with my docking skills) the paint holds up very well. In fact, if not for the occasional scrape, I would not need to repaint. The paint is very durable. It's fussy to thin, but done once it's easy. I actually look forward to repainting-its that easy
Any photos of her? I have been thinking of taking my white Columbia to dark blue also. I know the prep will be the hard part. Mine already has a coat of some kind of less than durable enamel. What did you use to fair and fill the hull?
 

·
Senior Moment Member
Joined
·
13,292 Posts
The best filler I've ever used was a tip given to me by an old German plasterer who owned the local boatyard.

Epoxy thickened with talc - dirt cheap - I bought a cement sack of talc for $20. You can mix it to the consistency you want, it sands beautifully and doesn't even suffer from pinholes unless you over-thicken it.

It even leaves your hands feeling nice.
 

·
Less Senior Senior Member
Joined
·
1,446 Posts
Discussion Starter · #248 ·
Wasn't planning on painting the hull this year. You're making me think about it.
 

·
1968 Columbia 50
Columbia 50
Joined
·
580 Posts
The best filler I've ever used was a tip given to me by an old German plasterer who owned the local boatyard.

Epoxy thickened with talc - dirt cheap - I bought a cement sack of talc for $20. You can mix it to the consistency you want, it sands beautifully and doesn't even suffer from pinholes unless you over-thicken it.

It even leaves your hands feeling nice.
I have heard about using talc, a couple people have used it and highly recommended it, as opposed to the alternatives.

All this talk about painting led me to a pic of a sister boat to mine, that was painted black, and looks gorgeous, and being a northern clime I don't have to worry about the interior getting too hot due to hull color....and I need to repaint everything inside and out anyways.

I will start a new post if anyone is interested in what will be a long term restoration of my C-50...with some as bought pictures to tease ya'll with. :devil
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
19,488 Posts
Black and Flag Blue IMO are the most attractive colours esp for these kinds of boats with the overhangs and sheerlines. Offset by strongly contrasting cove and boot stripes they are simply stunning (Gold or Red, I think, for the stripes) A deep rich varnish on the wood trim finishes the picture.

There is one downside, however, if on the briny. We have a friend with a very nice Sceptre 43 in deep blue.. he spends a lot of time wiping/washing the salt off after a day on the water. Granted he's a bit anal, but the dried salt does stand out on a dark hull. On the plus side you tend to get rid of it.. on a white hull it's hard to notice.

Our last boat was in Whisper Grey with black striping.. kind of neat because at a distance it looked more or less white, but alongside the other 'bleach bottles' it stood out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,898 Posts
The Admiral also admires the flag blue boats. I have warned her that even here in CT, it gets hot enough to make a dark-hulled boat uncomfortable. And any imperfections in the hull surface really show up under a dark paint. While I agree that few things look better than a CCA-style hull in flag blue, it just ain't gonna happen for me: too much prep work, and too hot!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
No photos currently. There is a Vanguard website where about 400 owners catalog there various restoration efforts. I would caution that painting it blue does make the interior insufferably hot. Even in New England. I insulated my interior as I was living aboard, but I'd not consider painting an uninsulated boat black or blue. Think 100 degrees in the cabin if not insulated.
 

·
Senior Moment Member
Joined
·
13,292 Posts
I will start a new post if anyone is interested in what will be a long term restoration of my C-50...with some as bought pictures to tease ya'll with. :devil
Absolutely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
966 Posts
This is my simple set up for painting the topsides. This is one coat of white Easy Poxy:I've just applied red boot top and cove. This year, I went with straight semi-gloss. I'll probably go back to a 50/50 mix of semi and gloss.

Taping off is a large part of the job. Believe it or not, the actual sanding with 220 in a 6" RO sander and the painting, doesn't take that long.

I thin the paint and with a foam roller and a good brush, I'll roll and tip down one side, re-set the staging, and roll and tip the other in about 3 hours of pleasant(if I thinned correctly and the weather cooperates).

Usually, about 3' of area is what gets rolled-tipped, then move down the staging. The trick or knack is in the thinning, the timing and the airs effect on the paint.

Looking at this, I can see why the wooden boat style often includes no boot top and sometimes the cove stripe(if there is one) gets painted the same as the body. The reason; much less work to be done.



One important thing I've learned. I don't get too hung up on perfection in the boatyard. I still get a run-sag or two. And working outside, a few bugs will land in the paint, some bozo will drive by at 30 mph, etc.

Don't drive yourself crazy(unless you're a perfectionist). Once the boat is launched, there is no angle to see the same detail in the finish. The light, reflected off the water, hides most everything. And there's always next time, to do a better job.

 

·
Old enough to know better
Joined
·
4,346 Posts
This is my simple set up for painting the topsides. This is one coat of white Easy Poxy:I've just applied red boot top and cove. This year, I went with straight semi-gloss. I'll probably go back to a 50/50 mix of semi and gloss.

Taping off is a large part of the job. Believe it or not, the actual sanding with 220 in a 6" RO sander and the painting, doesn't take that long.

I thin the paint and with a foam roller and a good brush, I'll roll and tip down one side, re-set the staging, and roll and tip the other in about 3 hours of pleasant(if I thinned correctly and the weather cooperates).

Usually, about 3' of area is what gets rolled-tipped, then move down the staging. The trick or knack is in the thinning, the timing and the airs effect on the paint.

Looking at this, I can see why the wooden boat style often includes no boot top and sometimes the cove stripe(if there is one) gets painted the same as the body. The reason; much less work to be done.



One important thing I've learned. I don't get too hung up on perfection in the boatyard. I still get a run-sag or two. And working outside, a few bugs will land in the paint, some bozo will drive by at 30 mph, etc.

Don't drive yourself crazy(unless you're a perfectionist). Once the boat is launched, there is no angle to see the same detail in the finish. The light, reflected off the water, hides most everything. And there's always next time, to do a better job.

While the paint may not be perfect, the shape and look sure is! You are getting me excited about spring work, as I was really dreading the painting, as most magazines make it sound like a real chore. I think the deck is likely harder as it is not flat with lots of bends and curves. I am thinking I will use a lot of Kiwi grip on the deck, as it will hide a lot of imperfections.

Anyone have any experience with Total Boat wet edge. Not sure who makes it for them, as I doubt the make it themselves. Jamestown seems to have good support if I run into any issues. Pearl grey looks nice in the Pettit.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
19,488 Posts
"Far from perfect, but perfect from afar".... the DIYer's mantra ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
We need a moratorium on spring commissioning references, I'm going to want to paint and relaunch in December! I will add to Tom's description of painting though. Early morning is best just after the dew has evaporated off the hull, but before it heats up in the sun. Have an old piece plate glass or a mirror to roll and tip as a test to see what ratio of thinner gives the best flow. Properly thinned, the two part urethanes will flow almost like baby oil and tipping it will allow it to flatten any roller marks. I rolled a three foot section then tipped as I moved down the staging. Also, you want staging down one whole side because you don't want to start moving your platform halfway through the process-the solvent will flash or the hull will warm in the sun and then you have a mess on your hands. Roll on horizontally and tipped vertically. I use a foam brush and get great results. It's not uncommon to need to adjust the mix as the paint pail gets less full. The solvent flashes off so that the remaining paint drags a bit, in which case its time to thin a little more.

The painting takes me twenty minutes a side on my 32 foot not worth restoring Vanguard. The initial prep for the base primer took....many days. My gel coat was crazed and required sealing with epoxy before priming. That and the 50 years of accumulated nicks and dings took a long time to repair, but once done subsequent finish work is a snap.
Jim
 

·
Old enough to know better
Joined
·
4,346 Posts
In one of Jamestown's videos they suggest having the yard putting the boat in North-South orientation, that way in the morning one side is in the shade, then later that afternoon the other side is.
 
241 - 260 of 301 Posts
Top