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Discussion Starter #281
Well- she's back in the water. Shots of the salon table and interior. Definitely not done, but getting closer to it.
 

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Looking good.
 
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Discussion Starter #283
Thanks. As it went through the process of stripping the fiberglass down because of the prior poor bottom job, I was impressed with the lack of major osmotic damage. There were some minor blisters and cracks, but all were easily ground out and filled and faired. The bottom and hull were otherwise quite solid. My personal experience is that these old boats seem to be able to take a bit of a licking and neglect and are still quite solid.
 

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Nice work!

Except for a new exhaust (which was a success!), this was mostly a 'lipstick' year for my 56 year old classic plastic.

There was a little rotted wood surgery(there's always some of that,..)





Then there was a lot of painting, which my daughter gave me a hand with:



My son has a good eye, so he lines up the stars on Xmas: Here in 2002-



And just a couple weeks ago, in 2017(note the new exhaust outlet):



The dog always helps. Last winter we built a couple of replacement dorade boxes with Lexan tops (adds dead lights below).



It all came together - patching and painting - as it always does when you have good help.



This is our storage. Working on your boat outside on the coast of Maine, is challenging. Between rainstorms, we got the paint and varnish on.

 

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Looking awesome, Tom!

Your crew too!
 

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I must comment....that's a fine looking boat!!....good to see your kids are right into it,helping out,can't put a price on what that is worth to all involved.....Ralph
 

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Tom, I want to echo what was said about how wonderful it is that your children are involved. My Dad and I worked on the boats together from the time when I was a pre-teen. We built a friendship, and ease in talking with each other, and a trust that has lasted our entire lifetime. Dad is now 90 and I am in my mid-60s, but I still think our relationship was strengthened by the times we shared when I was a kid. It is a wonderful thing that you are doing and you should be very proud of yourself, your daughter, and your son (and I assume your wife).

Jeff
 

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Great lookin boat, Tom. My wife and i were in Rockport last weekend in April. We had a wonderful time. We loved the area in spite of doing a brake job in the rain. We are going back next year, and hopefully soon in our plastic classic after that!
blessings
jon
 

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Tom, I want to echo what was said about how wonderful it is that your children are involved. My Dad and I worked on the boats together from the time when I was a pre-teen. We built a friendship, and ease in talking with each other, and a trust that has lasted our entire lifetime. Dad is now 90 and I am in my mid-60s, but I still think our relationship was strengthened by the times we shared when I was a kid. It is a wonderful thing that you are doing and you should be very proud of yourself, your daughter, and your son (and I assume your wife).

Jeff
Thanks, Jeff. Boats and sailing are a part of our family. Both our children are very capable thanks to them always having an interest.

My daughter who now lives in Brooklyn and works in Manhattan took the week off to visit. She wanted to help me with boat work, as well. Attaching hand rails and dorade boxes - with me below and she above - was a breeze. We rolled and tipped our 38'er in 2 1/2 hours(prep was significantly more).



Our son, as well as some of his friends, own a few older (60's era) glass boats that are free these days. They have to do everything themselves to save money.

Our family had a hoot building a mast crane so we can step their masts for free from the public landing. Testing the crane in the driveway:



It worked the trick on our sons boat. He helped a friend with a similar old boat, blast out rotted deck core re-set leaking stantions, pulpits. I didn't get involved (all my tools did,...) They even stepped that mast with the crane, alone. When I pointed out his friends outboard was angled 20 degrees out of square to the waterline, he quickly built a stout new mount of wood - adding angle with a cleat - and bolted it through the old mount, in a couple hours. I was impressed(and told him so).



Whenever I read a typical millennial rant; kids glued to their devices, I think to myself, it's true. But they're doing everything we did, and texting a friend at the same time.
 

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Rhodes Reliant.

Speaking of 60's era boats, Philip Rhodes - who's career spanned over 50 years - was one of the pioneers in the wood to fiberglass boat design, revolution.

His 41' Rhodes Reliant - designed much as a wooden boat - took advantage of the 'new space age material' fiberglass, for the Reliant's hull. The idea then; the beauty of wood, the lower maintenance of glass.



But the Reliant was different. A center cockpit? Two dodgers? What's going on?

The Reliant is in fact, an aft cockpit boat.



But below, it has an aft cabin with two snug quarter berths. Those berths can be separated from the saloon. The off watch enjoys the quiet while the active watch can move to the saloon for meals, breaks. What a great idea for a sailboat designed to sail(not a good live-aboard design).



He made that possible with a forward companionway. Rhodes drew a nice visual trick, hiding the companionway in the coamings and lines. It's also pretty well protected. But you always have the main companionway if conditions warrant.

 

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Thanks, Jeff. Boats and sailing are a part of our family. Both our children are very capable thanks to them always having an interest.

........
It's extremely gratifying, isn't it, when your offspring grab onto and carry on with a passion of your own.

So many kids drift away, and most are young enough to start that they had 'no choice'.. they went with Mom and Dad. For them to take to sailing & boating and stay with it, as yours (and ours) have, is a wonderful thing.
 
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Discussion Starter #293
Like the floor, the little bit of color mix is quite attractive.
Thanks. Brazilian Teak and Maple for the floor, Rhodesian Teak and maple for the table.

Tom- your work always puts me to shame. Darn good looking boat. And family.
 

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I have just about finished sanding the decks, with the exception of around the cockpit and lazarette. Right now I am stripping the last of all the deck hardware in preparation of filling and fairing.

[/url]Untitled by Scott Ehrich, on Flickr[/IMG]

Yesterday, I spent a good chunk of the afternoon stripping off the old rotted coamings, seating, and the original traveler. I was hoping to be able to use the original wood as a template, but soo much of it is gone to use it as I had hoped. There are 49 years of PO holes, and such that need filling...I love a good project.

[url=https://flic.kr/p/VGxZEi]Untitled by Scott Ehrich, on Flickr[/URL]

And after.

[/url]Untitled by Scott Ehrich, on Flickr[/IMG]
 

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Discussion Starter #296
Wow. Brave man, but she'll be awesome when she's done.
 
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