SailNet Community banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was very worried about a centrifugal clutch on an outboard, but went with the Honda 2.3 for its light weight in comparison to others.

My problem is that on startup, when you put the throttle to the start position, when she fires its enough to engage the prop therefore lurching the boat forward. Less throttle, she won't start. Also, once running, when you play the throttle and choke until the engine is warm and idles comfortably, the prop tends to engage/disengage. These are times when I just would prefer to have a gear select so that I could start and play the throttle without the danger of the boat surging ahead unpredictably. Also, when turning the motor around for reverse, swapping the tiller to the other side changes the throttle unintentionally as well causing undesired thrust sometimes.

I'm very used to centrifugal clutches having grown up on snowmobiles - but this is much worse. I'm really debating on getting rid of it after only a few months of use.

I have had the engine in at a dealer once and all adjustments were checked so that eliminates throttle settings etc. Am I somehow doing something stupid? When it surges, its only momentarily before I dial back the throttle, but any less throttle and it just won't start. Its a real pain in the rear and I'm really embarrassed when people see me start my engine and it surges forward a foot. I've been around outboards most of my life. Not like this is my first rodeo, but with this Honda it sure feels and looks like it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,338 Posts
seeing as that was the outboard I was considering before getting my troller, I sure am glad I made the choice I did. Sounds like you have had a ton of issues with this thing.
Any thought of selling it and switching to something else? Sometimes taking the loss is worth it just for the peace of mind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
454 Posts
I had one for years that had NO clutch. It was just in gear always. Actually sounds easier than what you got. It was real fun when the Honda dealer "fixed" it and the stop switch would not work :eek:
I recently scored a 3.5 HP 2 stroke Nissan with F-N for $100 for my brother. Craigslist is your friend ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
avenger79:1074248 said:
seeing as that was the outboard I was considering before getting my troller, I sure am glad I made the choice I did. Sounds like you have had a ton of issues with this thing.
Any thought of selling it and switching to something else? Sometimes taking the loss is worth it just for the peace of mind.
Well, the gas problem I'll give them a pass on. They did warranty it at the recommendation of the dealer. I believe the debris (looked like a tiny tiny piece of cardboard fiber) came from the factory, but technically it could be argued that it is *possible * it came from me I suppose. As I said, this isn't my first rodeo - I'm very careful about gas filling etc. And, they did fix it - I'll give them that.

But this centrifugal clutch seems like a bad design on an outboard. I would think it would be fine on a fuel injected motor. But on a carb'd motor where starting and warm up are not computer controlled and vary by conditions... I feel like a total amateur when dealing with it. It feels unsafe - ie. For that split second I'm not 100% in control and that's not acceptable to me.

I am a complete amateur sailor for sure - but motors/motoring is not new to me and I consider myself pretty good in this category. I am definitely considering dumping it for something with a traditional gear shift. Call me old fashioned I guess.

The only reason I still have it is because no matter how much one knows, there is always more to learn - so I'm wondering if this truly is a bad design or maybe I can learn what is wrong with me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,022 Posts
The motor must be intended to start at low enough RPMs so that the clutch does not engage. Almost the whole point of having a centrifugal clutch is to be able to start the thing without taking off. What does the owner's manual say? Does the throttle indicate a "start" position?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
caberg:1074293 said:
The motor must be intended to start at low enough RPMs so that the clutch does not engage. Almost the whole point of having a centrifugal clutch is to be able to start the thing without taking off. What does the owner's manual say? Does the throttle indicate a "start" position?
Correct. It has a throttle "start" position. The prop engages with the throttle well below this setting, but the engine will not start with any less. That's exactly my conundrum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,338 Posts
I wonder if when they cleaned out the carb etc maybe they altered the setting some so it won't start as it should? Maybe the engagment of the prop wound up getting set too low? Has to be a setting issue I would think. Centrifugal clutch motors are not "new", it's been done for years.
 

·
no longer reading SailNet
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
I have the version that is always in gear (no clutch) and it works well for me. It seems odd that the clutch would make it more confusing instead of less, but maybe it does. Is there a way to lock the clutch out so that you only have forward gear?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Alex W:1074310 said:
I have the version that is always in gear (no clutch) and it works well for me. It seems odd that the clutch would make it more confusing instead of less, but maybe it does. Is there a way to lock the clutch out so that you only have forward gear?
A centrifugal clutch is always in gear. It only has a forward gear. The clutch disengages thus allowing the motor to turn the prop after it surpasses a certain rpm (just like a snowmobile). At idle, the prop does not turn. The problem is that the required start position for the throttle gives enough rpm for the clutch to disengage causing a momentary thrust on startup. Any less throttle, and the engine does not start. O
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Alex W:1074310 said:
I have the version that is always in gear (no clutch) and it works well for me. It seems odd that the clutch would make it more confusing instead of less, but maybe it does. Is there a way to lock the clutch out so that you only have forward gear?
If you have no clutch, and the motor is always in gear - the prop would always turn unless the motor was off. I believe you also have the centrifugal clutch just like mine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Just googled more and found quite a few people complaining of the same thing - start throttle higher than clutch disengagement causing a surge forward on startup. I guess I'm not the only one and it seems to be the nature of the beast.

Also, I stand corrected I think. Looks like there was a model without the clutch. Prop does turn all the time but extremely slowly at idle. Ugh. Just seems like both options are an all together bad idea/design. But then again, that's just my opinion.
 

·
no longer reading SailNet
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
Yes, the prop on mine always turns. You can pull the start cord slowly and watch the prop turn. There is no neutral or reverse.

I think it's a great little engine. It always starts right up, is easy to maintain, was cheap to buy (used) and has plenty of power for my rigid dink.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
454 Posts
No - We had the old Honda with no gear shift or clutch of ANY kind. Start it and it goes!
Actually sounds better than what you have.

If you have no clutch, and the motor is always in gear - the prop would always turn unless the motor was off. I believe you also have the centrifugal clutch just like mine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Coquina:1074363 said:
No - We had the old Honda with no gear shift or clutch of ANY kind. Start it and it goes!
Actually sounds better than what you have.

If you have no clutch, and the motor is always in gear - the prop would always turn unless the motor was off. I believe you also have the centrifugal clutch just like mine.
Yep, I stand corrected. I was actually totally surprised that there was such a thing. Agreed, sounds better than mine but I still don't like the idea of the prop always turning either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,870 Posts
I have been considering getting either the Honda 2.3 or the Suzuki 2.5. they weight the same. I was all for the honda because it does not need to be flushed. starting to change my mind. flushing seem to be a small price to pay for ease of operation and a quieter engine. I am thinking what happens when the engine gets a little older and requires a few more pulls and higher throttle setting to get it started.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
overbored:1074385 said:
I have been considering getting either the Honda 2.3 or the Suzuki 2.5. they weight the same. I was all for the honda because it does not need to be flushed. starting to change my mind. flushing seem to be a small price to pay for ease of operation and a quieter engine. I am thinking what happens when the engine gets a little older and requires a few more pulls and higher throttle setting to get it started.
I couldn't agree with you more. Mine is only a few months old. Can't imagine what it might be like after a few years.

Hmmm. Maybe I'm shooting myself in the foot here. I want to get rid of this thing. Maybe I should be raving about what an innovative design it is LOL. :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
I have the same Honda and it can be a little disconcerting in some situations. When possible I stay side-tied to the dock until after I have started the little bugger and have it calmed down. This only takes a second and does not seem to put too much stress on the docklines. When that's not possible or convenient I point my dink in the right direction, make sure it's clear and start and GO!
Cutterdad
S/V Imagine
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
cutterdad:1074417 said:
I have the same Honda and it can be a little disconcerting in some situations. When possible I stay side-tied to the dock until after I have started the little bugger and have it calmed down. This only takes a second and does not seem to put too much stress on the docklines. When that's not possible or convenient I point my dink in the right direction, make sure it's clear and start and GO!
Cutterdad
S/V Imagine
LOL - your strategy is identical to mine. I hate it. It makes me look like I have no idea what the heck I'm doing, and as careful as I am to manage this ridiculous design/operation, I still feel it's dangerous. I should have trusted my suspect feelings on this and went with a different engine.
 

·
Over Hill Sailing Club
Joined
·
3,688 Posts
Sounds like your motor is defective. If the dealer can't make it start with the shaft disengaged, he/she should take it back...period. It doesn't work. Centrifugal clutches have been around forever, no rocket science here, something's defective or poorly engineered, which is not like Honda.

I've had little outboards that were direct drive. They are useable if you're quick but you paid for one with a clutch which IS a lot safer to deal with.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top