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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello,

I have recently purchased a '77 Catalina 27' and I am in the process of doing standard maintenance and caring for it during the winter months. I have done a lot of deck sealing just this weekend and my next concern is stowing the foresail and possibly the Harken roller furling.

First question is - how do I remove the foresail? I don't yet know how to sail and have not been tought how to use the rigging on my boat, but I don't want to leave the sail out all winter long if I don't have to. The sail is on a Harken MKIII roller furling and I would also like advice on what to cover this with to keep it out of the elements.

Second questions - can sails be cleaned at home or should they only be cleaned by professionals?

Third question - is there a solvent you can use on the metal deck plates to clean them of old sealant? I have both a white and a clear sealant that I am trying to remove on most of the plates.

Thanks in advance for the advice and instruction,

Chris
 

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Telstar 28
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Hello,

I have recently purchased a '77 Catalina 27' and I am in the process of doing standard maintenance and caring for it during the winter months. I have done a lot of deck sealing just this weekend and my next concern is stowing the foresail and possibly the Harken roller furling.

First question is - how do I remove the foresail? I don't yet know how to sail and have not been tought how to use the rigging on my boat, but I don't want to leave the sail out all winter long if I don't have to. The sail is on a Harken MKIII roller furling and I would also like advice on what to cover this with to keep it out of the elements.
Lower the halyard, and pull the sail down. The luff should have a wire "bolt rope" that is fed into the foil on the Harken furler. Unclip the tack and head of the sail from the furler and halyard swivel, untie the sheets from the clew, and flake it.

Second questions - can sails be cleaned at home or should they only be cleaned by professionals?
Yes, there have been about a half-dozen threads on this in the last two months... use google to search for them. The in-house search function is very basic and usually blows chunks. :) BTW, you really should read the POST in my signature, since it has information on how to search sailnet's forums using google among other things and was written for N00bs to help them get more out of sailnet.

Third question - is there a solvent you can use on the metal deck plates to clean them of old sealant? I have both a white and a clear sealant that I am trying to remove on most of the plates.

Thanks in advance for the advice and instruction,

Chris
Depends on the sealant...but in most cases no, you need to use a razor in most cases. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Question #1- Totally did not understand any of what you said. I'm just learning the language.

questions #2- totally understand-the serach here was confusing. Just wanted to hear from others here.

Question #3- bummer. I did scrape the plates when I did it this weekend, but I was hoping there might be something better. The clear stuff is more difficult since it is so pliable. Just pushed all over the place instead of eventually breaking off.

Thanks for the reply.

Chris
 

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Roadkillibus Texanis
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My best advice would be . . . . . . . head to the nearest Marine store and browse the books. Don Casey has really good stuff. Number one . . . learn the parts of the boat. Don’t be embarrassed to ask questions around the dock. Taking a basic sailing course and at least the ASA or US Sailing Keelboat would be a great start. I highly recommend it.

You have a great boat! I love those Catalina 27’s! Enjoy!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks- I love the boat and it is in fantastic shape, thus the urgency to get the deck sealed and keep the gear in good shape. I have a basic sailing book, just haven't had the time to crack it open.

there is a sailing school located in our marina and I am scheduling a class after my December/January schedule lightens up. Wed of this week through January 31 are going to be crazy busy so I want to get everything I can off the boat this week.

Thanks again for the replies. I would ask folks on the dock, but it was 32 degrees there on Saturday and I saw one other person.

Chris
 

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Telstar 28
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Highly recommend you go out and buy Dave Seidman's The Complete Sailor. It's about $15 at most big book stores.

The Halyard is the line that goes up the mast and comes down to attach to the top point of the sail, called the head of the sail, and is used to raise or hoist the sail.


The Luff of the sail is the forward edge of the sail. In the case of a head sail, the portion attached to the forestay or furling unit. The rear edge of the sail is known as the Leech, and the bottom is the FOOT

The Tack of the sail is the forward most lower corner of the sail, where the luff and the foot of the sail meet. The Clew is the corner of the sail where the foot and the leech meet, where the sheets are attached to the headsail.

Sheets are the lines that run back to the cockpit and are used for controlling the sail.
 

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Your deck sealing should be under the deck plate and not just around the edges. This is not a house and not done the same way. agree, get the book.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yep, all deck plates were pulled up. That's why I was asking about maybe a solvent or something to help remove the old sealant-it isn't really easy to get underneath the plate with less than 1" of clearance.
 

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Speedagent...

It's on page 1034, 1123 and 1789 of Tolstoy's War and Peace and Sailboats. You should know that.

Whilst you are searching for it, I will tell you.

Taking a foresail down is an absolute gift, and it will take about 2 minutes if dry, and about 10 if wet (and not raining). You simply unfurl the sail and let it dry for a wee while. It does not take too long. Now send a man to the bow to stop it falling into the drink, and lower the foresail by loosening the foresail halyard. As the sail falls, the man at the bow catches it then you both stuff it into a sailbag. You then take the sailbag home to your garden and fold the sail a bit better. If it has been raining, dry it in your front room for a day or two first (no wife around).

The Harken will look after itself all winter. Don't try to take it down unless you have to. It is easy to bend the "foils" and they are expensive. You will also have to disturb the forestay and leave the mast wobbling about. Just leave it

Second question : I just scrub them with a big brush and some mild detergent. Laundering sails is very expensive. I don't bother with that one.

Third question : If acetone won't shift it, in my experience nothing will.

Be good....

Rockter.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
"Tolstoy originally wanted to name the book '"War....what is it good for?"'

Thanks for the description-you explained it to me like I don't know what I'm doing and it absolutely made sense. Cheers!

Maybe I can get up to the boat tomorrow to bring it home.

Thanks everybody,

Chris
 

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Roadkillibus Texanis
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"Tolstoy originally wanted to name the book '"War....what is it good for?"'

Thanks for the description-you explained it to me like I don't know what I'm doing and it absolutely made sense. Cheers!

Maybe I can get up to the boat tomorrow to bring it home.

Thanks everybody,

Chris

I see somebody is getting into the spirit of Festivus!
 

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Watkins 23
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Speed Agent,
A really good solvent is Goof Off. I wouldn't use it on anything but metal as a rule though. It will take off paint quicker than lacquer thinner. I find it takes off stuff that acetone won't. I found it at Home Depot. Probably available in other hardware and home improvement stores. I don't know if it was on this forum or another but I remember someone saying it would even melt 3M 5200. I haven't tried it on that yet. It worked for me on 3M 4200. It might be worth a try but be careful. It will eat what it touches. It is strong. Use it with GOOD ventilation also. Might be worth a try.

Richard
 

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Lower the halyard, and pull the sail down. The luff should have a wire "bolt rope" that is fed into the foil on the Harken furler. Unclip the tack and head of the sail from the furler and halyard swivel, untie the sheets from the clew, and flake it.
Is it just me or
didn't we forget to mention "Unfurl the Sail."
I can't lower my sail if its still wrapped around the forestay.
I know it maybe understood for most of us, but the OP has expressed is complete newbie status.
 

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Also, I was going to add, Call the "Moyel".
 

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Rockter said, "You simply unfurl the sail..."
I see that Rocketer did, but the Dog forgot to mention it.
Got to give the Dog crap everytime we can.
 

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TJK-

I'm assuming the OP has more brains and common sense than you do... :)
 
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