SailNet Community banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1972 Flying Scot with very hard, badly flaking white deck paint of unknown origin. This white "paint" is on top of the original beige gelcoat, and it is very hard. I can break off bits of flake, and they are very hard and inflexible. I'm not sure if this is a second layer of gelcoat, or epoxy paint, or what? I've tried peel-away, but the "paint" seems impervious. I've made very slow progress with 80 grit random orbital, but that looks like weeks of work. Does anyone know of a paint remover that will work on epoxy paint without damaging the underlying gelcoat?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
534 Posts
NO, sorry. I have a simular problem. I finally tried the usual paint solvents, staying away from stronger ones that would harm the gel coat.

After removing as much as I could that way, none of them softened the paint much, and I didn't want to go too extreme. I finally just sanded and scraped as much as I could. Then painted over the rest with a good quality deck paint.

I know I just kicked the problem down the road, but the boat looks good right now, and if I get a few years of use without further peeling I'm good.
 

·
Tartan 27' owner
Joined
·
5,238 Posts
Have you tried Acetone? or MEK (Methyl ethyl ketone)?
Without knowing if it is a paint or gelcoat its kind of hard to say what will work besides a sander.
 

·
Senior Moment Member
Joined
·
13,298 Posts
Go to 40 grit. 80 is an intermediate grit for a job like that - use 40, then 60 and THEN 80. After that you can start working with "finish" grits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,641 Posts
Hardened epoxy is forever, there are no solvents to remove it IF it is truly epoxy.

Which means either sanding, grinding, or media blasting. If the blast guy is good, he might be able to soda blast it with just enough pressure to take off the epocy without damaging the gelcoat. Maybe soda, maybe a different media, but that's the approach I'd look into.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks to all of you for your good input. Acetone has no effect, I'll try some MEK on a small test spot. I think 40 grit may be the ticket, although 80 was the coarsest grade I saw in Lowes. I hear people talk about using grinders. I've got one and I can't imagine controlling it well enough to not gouge the heck out of the boat.
 

·
Tartan 27' owner
Joined
·
5,238 Posts
With my 4-1/2" grinder I use the round sandpaper disks on it and find that it is pretty easy to control using a light touch. I use it for quick and dirty fine adjustments with some woodworking projects. These sanding disks only come in a few grit sizes.

Carpet cutters razor blades might be useful for chipping up the loose spots. These blades are about 1/2" x 4" long and stronger then std. razors.

If your paint is unaffected by Acetone I have my doubts that MEK will work except that MEK is used by some as a thinner for epoxy.

Good luck.
 

·
Roadkillibus Texanis
Joined
·
1,602 Posts
Respirator and inexpensive sand blaster. Works miracles. :)
 

·
Senior Moment Member
Joined
·
13,298 Posts
I hear people talk about using grinders. I've got one and I can't imagine controlling it well enough to not gouge the heck out of the boat.
NEVER use a grinder on a hull or deck - you will ruin it - for sure!
 

·
Barquito
Joined
·
3,775 Posts
With my 4-1/2" grinder I use the round sandpaper disks on it and find that it is pretty easy to control using a light touch.
NEVER use a grinder on a hull or deck - you will ruin it - for sure!
I agree with both. I am grinding non-skid off my deck. Takes forever with RA sander. With a really (really) careful technique, I can get a smooth result with a grinder. It is so much faster with the grinder. It is worth having to patch a few spots caused by over-agressive grinding. If you are going to be patching some dings and painting anyway, it doesn't add much work.
 

·
Roadkillibus Texanis
Joined
·
1,602 Posts
Blasting has been great for me. I went through several layers of paint on a 1961 Kestrel leaving a beautifully clean and unharmed molded in gelcoat cross hatched non skid deck. You can use different media for different applications. Soda works great on decks with non skid. Playground sand on metals. If you don't have the set up a yard can do it for a few hundred bucks. Well worth the price.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
870 Posts
Blasting has been great for me. I went through several layers of paint on a 1961 Kestrel leaving a beautifully clean and unharmed molded in gelcoat cross hatched non skid deck. You can use different media for different applications. Soda works great on decks with non skid. Playground sand on metals. If you don't have the set up a yard can do it for a few hundred bucks. Well worth the price.
You can sandblast an entire deck for a few hundred bucks? With or without deck hardware removed? I know very little about sandblasting, I've never seen it done. I've got a painted deck that was done ok. By my boat's standards it's ok for now but it will probably be bad in a few years.
 

·
Roadkillibus Texanis
Joined
·
1,602 Posts
Yes. I was quoted (7 years ago) $300 to take the 22' full keel hull from toe rail down to gelcoat. I'm sure you'd have to remove your hardware to keep the cost down. If you decide to get the stuff to do it yourself get a full face shield, a respirator and gloves. That stuff really hurts.

I use my blaster for a bunch of things. Rust related mostly.
 

·
Senior Moment Member
Joined
·
13,298 Posts
Yes. I was quoted (7 years ago) $300 to take the 22' full keel hull from toe rail down to gelcoat. I'm sure you'd have to remove your hardware to keep the cost down. If you decide to get the stuff to do it yourself get a full face shield, a respirator and gloves. That stuff really hurts.

I use my blaster for a bunch of things. Rust related mostly.
If you decide to do this, don't use sand or you'll destroy the boat. Use soda, walnut shells, plastic media - one of the less abrasive media. One slip or moment of inattention with sand can ruin a car body and they're STEEL.
 

·
Roadkillibus Texanis
Joined
·
1,602 Posts
Depends on the pressure. I used very fine screened sand at low pressure. Yes there are different media and I would recommend them. Recovery is important due to the expense.
 

·
Barquito
Joined
·
3,775 Posts
I assume media blasting would require a huge compressor? Could it be done slowly with a smaller compressor, or is that just stupid?
 

·
Senior Moment Member
Joined
·
13,298 Posts
I assume media blasting would require a huge compressor? Could it be done slowly with a smaller compressor, or is that just stupid?
It can be - I have a "real" 2 horse Speedaire compressor (15 amps 110V with a double capacitor soft start) and a siphon blasting gun - it simply draws out of a bucket of media.

You better have time though - a LOT of time. :D It is really only good for small stuff - spot blasting on auto sheet metal, small parts etc. I wouldn't want to do anything bigger than a wheel with it.
 

·
Roadkillibus Texanis
Joined
·
1,602 Posts
John's right, it can be done. Bigger the compressor shorter the time. If it's the whole boat and you don't want to take the time and effort to recover and screen the media . . . pay a yard. If you're skimpy like me go for it. Just owning the equipment will be worth it for years to come.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top