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Hello all -

This is my first post (and no doubt, the first of many). I've recently purchased a well-sailed 1983 Hinckley Bermuda 40 MK III that is currently on Tilghman Island, MD. It has already been once around the world (without me). I'm trying to get it back into shape so it can take me around.

Right now, among other things, I'm trying to deal with some rot in the interior mahogany plywood bulkhead that frames the companionway. I'm trying to determine how the plywood is affixed to the fiberglass cockpit - and how to remove it. I've scoured the Internet and have found many, many articles on how to remove fiberglass from plywood - but I haven't found one that discusses how to remove plywood from fiberglass - so I can replace the plywood. The Hinckley folks have told me that it "probably" is "glued and screwed" - but they weren't specific about what kind of "glue" they're talking about.

Does anyone have any information about what kind of "glue" is likely to have been used (epoxy?) - and the best way to remove the plywood without warping the fiberglass (or setting it on fire)?

Thanks
 

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At the sailing center with a practiced hand our guy uses an oscillating tool with a flat combination scraping/trimming blade in it. Take your time and deal with any screws as you find them.

For home use the corded model from Harbor Freight should be just fine.

 

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You won't know till you pull the trim and try and remove the plywood. The plywood is strictly a cosmetic piece so may not be bonded to the cabin side at all. On the other hand, they could have used 5200 just because and you'll need a crowbar to remove it. If it is bonded with caulking. Slowly prying it apart from the edges and driving in wedges and waiting for them to work and driving them in further and it will slowly come apart, even 5200. 'Debond' is a solvent available to ease removal of parts bedded with 5200. Might try that if it's a problem. If they used 'Liquid Nails' or other construction adhesive a haunt of Google might give you some hints about ways to make removal easier.
 

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Looking at the Thumbnail if its just the bottom corner on each side of the companionway you may want to just pull the trim, treat the spots of rot with Git-Rot and then replace the trim with some that's slightly wider so it will cover the treated area.


"Git"-Rot
 

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Damn SeaStar58, you wouldn't want the guy to have a simple fix for his problem. Seems I always decide the most extensive fix is the right one when simply treating the rot and changing the trim would be way easier. Good idea.
 

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Damn SeaStar58, you wouldn't want the guy to have a simple fix for his problem. Seems I always decide the most extensive fix is the right one when simply treating the rot and changing the trim would be way easier. Good idea.
Git-Rot has saved a lot of folks much grief over the years especially if its just localized damage where water has seeped in at the corners of a companion way opening.

We are dealing with rot in a transom on an S2 where someone tried to put a large outboard on it and after he damaged the transom he did not seal it up like he should have from the outside. He was not seeing water inside so it was OK, right? Wrong as water was getting into the core from the outside and it was left that way until 2/3 to 3/4 the core in the transom was rotted and so wet that there was no way to treat it with Get-Rot. Thankfully the rot did not extend up to where the chain plates for the back stay are mounted however we really do not like that so much of the area below the chain plates was so bad that it had to be completely removed all the way to the bottom. No simple solution on this one unfortunately.
 

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Before I would trust a product like Git-Rot, I would like to cut into some rotted wood it was used on. If you've ever seen badly rotted wood it just falls apart, so removing rotted wood is not always a tough job, but maybe time consuming. Putting new wood in to replace the rotted wood takes more time, and the work can be kept to a minimum if you only remove the rotted sections.
 

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Before I would trust a product like Git-Rot, I would like to cut into some rotted wood it was used on. If you've ever seen badly rotted wood it just falls apart, so removing rotted wood is not always a tough job, but maybe time consuming. Putting new wood in to replace the rotted wood takes more time, and the work can be kept to a minimum if you only remove the rotted sections.
Git-Rot has been tested for over half a century and the results are positive.

For two little wedges of rot in a large companion way bulkhead its a no brainer to just sound the board to map out the full extent of the damage, apply the Git-Rot with a syringe as per the instructions and let it harden so you can prevent the rot from traveling across the entire piece without cutting out sections and scabbing in Dutchmen patches. The repaired section is then stronger than the original wood on the rest of the bulkhead with the treated area now pretty impervious to rotting again so you are not just feeding the perpetual motion machine with more new wood to rot again. If you can dry the area out then you can use Git-Rot to restore it to stronger than new.
 

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I have discovered the joys of the oscillating tool. Extremely versatile tool and as mentioned, cheap ($20 at HF). I also use penetrating epoxy to good use. The challenge is getting the wet wood dried out.
 

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I have discovered the joys of the oscillating tool. Extremely versatile tool and as mentioned, cheap ($20 at HF). I also use penetrating epoxy to good use. The challenge is getting the wet wood dried out.
A fan and/or incandescent refrigerator light bulb can do wonders for the wet by getting things warm enough for the water to evaporate however sometimes it can be a challenge. Bagging the area and using a vacuum pump sometimes helps as will leaving a dehumidifier running inside the boat for several days.
 
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