SailNet Community banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,479 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was recently removing several small stainless screws. Some came out without a problem. Some required my impact diver and some were corroded (Stainless?) to the point that a screwdriver of any type, would no longer work. I tried an Easy Out, and a gizzmo called a "grabber". The stainless laughed at both! I recalled an old trick and grabbed my Dremel. Using a fine cutting wheel, I created a new slot and easily removed the screws with a flat screwdriver! In comparison with the other methods it was so easy and effective it was actually shocking, probably took 30 seconds! I did a search and didn't see it mentioned so i thought I would share it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
656 Posts
I recalled an old trick and grabbed my Dremel. Using a fine cutting wheel, I created a new slot and easily removed the screws with a flat screwdriver! In comparison with the other methods it was so easy and effective it was actually shocking, probably took 30 seconds! I did a search and didn't see it mentioned so i thought I would share it.
Great trick! Thanks for sharing. :)
 

·
Telstar 28
Joined
·
992 Posts
Stainless steel is just that, it stains less... not stain free... It does corrode, especially when in close proximity to aluminum, where the aluminum corrodes, due to the galvanic differences in the metals, and effectively bonds itself to the stainless steel. Heat, PBlaster, and cold often can work to break the corrosion induced bond.

I was recently removing several small stainless screws. Some came out without a problem. Some required my impact diver and some were corroded (Stainless?) to the point that a screwdriver of any type, would no longer work. I tried an Easy Out, and a gizzmo called a "grabber". The stainless laughed at both! I recalled an old trick and grabbed my Dremel. Using a fine cutting wheel, I created a new slot and easily removed the screws with a flat screwdriver! In comparison with the other methods it was so easy and effective it was actually shocking, probably took 30 seconds! I did a search and didn't see it mentioned so i thought I would share it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
928 Posts
One trick in removing or installing any screw is a good screwdriver.

Screwdrivers wear!

The first time a phillips driver slips throw it away. Best bet is to by drivers with replaceable bits.

Please don't try to use a #2 bit on a #3 screw.

Flat blade screwdrivers can be dressed to like new so they won't slip.

Most lifetime manufactures (snap on, craftsman, etc.) won't replace worn screwdrivers but if you place a philips driver in a vice and brake a tang they will.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,479 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Stainless steel is just that, it stains less... not stain free... It does corrode, especially when in close proximity to aluminum, where the aluminum corrodes, due to the galvanic differences in the metals, and effectively bonds itself to the stainless steel. Heat, PBlaster, and cold often can work to break the corrosion induced bond.
In this case the corrosion was so severe that the Phillips slots were gone, thread binding was not the issue. The screws were holding teak onto fiberglass. The funny thing is, all screws appeared to be the same, performed the same function, and were subjected to the same conditions. Only a few were badly corroded. Must be quality control (or lack thereof).
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top