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One of None
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It took me a while and quite a bit of wet dry sandpaper and safe for the environment paint remover to finally send Bert and Ernie back to the street!
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Now you’re ready for the renaming ceremony. Looks good.

I peeled the prior owner’s name off our transom. It was vinyl, but it was ghosted into the fiberglass, as the surrounding gel coat took more UV. I went at it, with some perfect-it. First pass, it looked pretty good, but I knew where it was and could still tell. So I did it again and again. I was getting a bit frustrated and then I noticed I could still make out the outline of the name prior to his!! I never noticed it and realized, if I just put my new name on, the rest would be overwhelmed and the barely detectable outlines below would disappear. Done.
 

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We're having the same problem with our hailing port. (We're keeping the name.) Underneath the painted-on hailing port is Awlgrip, so sandpaper is not a good idea; it would leave scoremarks. Have been rubbing with mineral spirits and acetone for about three hours so far. Looks like another three or four to go. Yoga is nothing compared to kneeling sideways on the transom scoop with one hand holding on to the stern rail and the other attacking the lettering. Then you get up to refresh the solvent and turn the other way to give each arm a change.
 

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We have to do this, remove the former name. The name takes up a good quarter of the aft sides of the hull.
 
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One of None
Hunter 34
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It is really difficult to remove the ghosting or embossing of the old gelcoat underneath painted on name and artwork, I felt bad for a little while but it because it was actually hand-painted.

I'm going to try a wood block with wet sandpaper and see if that will level the raised areas from the old names but it's probably something most of us have to live with.
 

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After a couple of sessions rubbing and scrubbing and scraping, I gave up and applied the new vinyl. It looks fine.
 

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Maybe I can convince the wife to choose a name long enough to cover up the old one.
 

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I'm going to try a wood block with wet sandpaper and see if that will level the raised areas from the old names but it's probably something most of us have to live with.
Is it truly raised, or might it seem that way to the touch, because the gel coat under the old painted name is shiny and protected, while the surrounding is a bit more porous. I ask, because it may not be sanding down the old lettering, but rather renewing everything around it. Can be done, just know what you’re getting into.
 

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Take a look at how I “renamed” my schooner. STERNBOARDS
Luckily the boards were separate pieces and removable, so it was easy to get the old vinyl letters off and repaint the boards. But rather than use vinyl letters, I bought raised acrylic letters and screwed them to the board. Very much more professional looking than cheap vinyl lettering. It’s all in the article. JR
 

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One of None
Hunter 34
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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
I'm a wooden boat builder no Stern boards for me! And I say that sternly! 🤣

You all realize? you're giving me advice on how to remove the name of my boat and I've already done that? It was really hard work but I did it an hour here an hour there over about a month and a half
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
We're having the same problem with our hailing port. (We're keeping the name.) Underneath the painted-on hailing port is Awlgrip, so sandpaper is not a good idea; it would leave scoremarks. Have been rubbing with mineral spirits and acetone for about three hours so far. Looks like another three or four to go. Yoga is nothing compared to kneeling sideways on the transom scoop with one hand holding on to the stern rail and the other attacking the lettering. Then you get up to refresh the solvent and turn the other way to give each arm a change.
If you ever seen a high-end repaint on a show car they do an operation called "color sanding" using fine, super fine, and ultra fine, wet paper to get a glass like polish, could you do that on awl grip? I don't know.
 
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Allegedly you cannot achieve the original polish of awl grip because the clear coat portion rises to the top when curing, but you can with awl craft, so says Boatworks today and other less reliable sources.

I've got to ask, is the new boat name Cookie Monster or Big Bird?:giggle:
 

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Sanding awlgrip will irreparably ruin it. Awcraft is color throughout, so a good tech could pull it off, but Awlcraft is not the same type of paint. It’s softer. The product I like, which is as good and tough as awlgrip, but color throughout and reparable, is Alexseal. Invented by the same guy as awlgrip.
 
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Be aware... that the newest/current Awlgrip product is several coats of color, topped by 3 to 4 clear coats. Buffed out... each coat.
We just had our whole boat repainted this year.
Better yet, this product is 'repairable' -- altho best done by an experienced and skilled person. (and that's not me)
Super Gloss!!
:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Okay consider this thread drifted there is no awl grip on my boat would never even consider using it.

I would just add you're all lumping polishing with super fine papers in with sanding it's not quite the same because super high gloss requires some type of compound whether it's on paper or on a buffing pad. I've used papers up to 1500 grit with great results but not on large projects. I believe it's available up to 3000 grit.
 
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Okay consider this thread drifted there is no awl grip on my boat would never even consider using it.

I would just add you're all lumping polishing with super fine papers in with sanding it's not quite the same because super high gloss requires some type of compound whether it's on paper or on a buffing pad. I've used papers up to 1500 grit with great results but not on large projects. I believe it's available up to 3000 grit.
If you read about gel coat repairs you will learn how fine the grit is before polishing wax is applied,
 

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Be aware... that the newest/current Awlgrip product is several coats of color, topped by 3 to 4 clear coats. Buffed out... each coat.
Do you have a reference for this? Awlgrip‘s technology was a soup of chemicals that naturally separated into color and clear gloss. You didn’t apply them separately, let alone multiple coats. Today’s formula is not exactly the original, as some of it’s original ingredients were banned for environmental reasons.

The inventor of Awlgrip sold it and signed a non-compete agreement. The moment the non-compete expired, he opened a new company and offered Alexseal. That can be applied in layers, but I still don’t think that’s how it’s applied. Rumor is he even bought back the original factory building, where they originally made Awlgrip. Trivia.
 

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What about using a heat gun to remove the old vinyl name?
 
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