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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just purchased a 1978 (possibly earlier) Flying Junior, and the deck needs to be repainted. I was wondering what steps I should go through, and what type of paint, as well if primer is needed, and which the best paint manufacture it is. Any help you can give is greatly appreciated; thank you in advance.


Also, if anyone knows where to find 3/4" rubber plugs to purchase, either a store or online in quantities less than 10, that would also be greatly appreciated. Thanks again!
 

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sorry we are not ignoring you. it depends on alot of things, including what you are looking for in finished quality.

top of the line is something like emron ( spelling ) or awlgrip or any 2 part poly paint. then you get in to one part poly paints. then you get in to the cheaper ways, like poly garage floor paint. but 95 % of painting is prep, sanding, degreasing and application.

we need to know things like cost of boat, size, overall condition. if its a smaller boat something like brightsides can be cheap enough, if it gets bigger than say 20 feet paint prices go up because of paint needed.

about the plugs i dont know? what do you need them for?

off to research your boat
 

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okay i found out its a sailing dinghy, about 13 feet in length.

i would use something like brightsides paint, cheap enough for that size boat. it should give a few years of looking decent. a quart should do the whole boat.

as for prep is pretty much the same as normal paint, clean, scrub, clean some more. sand to remove loose paint, fill and imperfections. then primer, sand primer till happy apply more primer, sand again then a couple of coats of top coat.

total cost for a boat that size is about 150, if you do it all your self.

if you want to go really nice, do all the prep work and bring the boat to a boat painting place, and have them spray it emron or awlgrip, if lucky they will do it cheap when they are painting another boat, but you might have to wait till they are using a color you like

edit, do some reading here, they are lots of ways to do the work, spraying, roll and tip.
 

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A fiberglass boat also needs a good wipe down with interlux 202 solvent or some similar product to remove any residual form release from the original casting of the fiberglass parts.
 

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Regarding the paint - I've used EasyPoxy by Petit on a few glass boats and have always been impressed with the results. I'ts a one-part paint and there is a good color selection. You can use a brush with no worries about brush stroke marks, etc. - they disappear. As already mentioned, the prep is the key - follow the mfg recommendations - very straightforward

Regarding the Plugs - I assume these are for drain holes/bailers. You can get them at Annapolis Performance Sailing - www.apsltd.com - look under bungs/plugs

Good luck.
 
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