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At the beginning of the year I bought a 1981 C&C32. I really enjoy this sailboat but there are several repair that must be made this winter. My priority is to fix all water leaks and for starter I rebed the bow hatch and remooved the old 1/2 inch lexan lens from the Atkins & Hoyle cast alluminum frame and I am ready to replace it with new one. The old lens was probably replaced by the previous boat owner and sealed with marine silicon that did not do the job. Does anybody know what is the appropriate selant for this project?
 

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And my question is, what is actually holding the lens in the hatch? Is there some sort of glue for actually attaching the lens to the aluminum, then some sort of sealant to seal up that 1/4 inch space all around the hatch? Or is it all in one shot?
 

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Select Plastics, recognized hatch rebuilders esp for Lewmars, use DC 795 for that job as a combined sealant/adhesive.
 
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And my question is, what is actually holding the lens in the hatch? Is there some sort of glue for actually attaching the lens to the aluminum, then some sort of sealant to seal up that 1/4 inch space all around the hatch? Or is it all in one shot?
It's bonded and sealed in one shot - use black Dow 795. It's used for curtain wall construction (glass faced highrises) so it will do just fine holding a lens in a hatch. :D

Mask everything very carefully first to avoid VERY messy cleanup. Clamp the lens LIGHTLY to locate it without squeezing out too much sealant.
 

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Umm, isn't that a silicone? I was under the impression (and experience) that silicone doesn't hold its bond very long...

It's an acrylic lens BTW
 

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795 is used to glue windows into skyscrapers. Its not just silicone. I used it on my A&H hatches.
 

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795 for acrylic, it's the stuff to use. I clean surfaces with alcohol prior to use.
 

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Umm, isn't that a silicone? I was under the impression (and experience) that silicone doesn't hold its bond very long...

It's an acrylic lens BTW
The silicones that you shouldn't use are those that smell strongly of vinegar.. DC 795 is a different beast altogether...
 

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Umm, isn't that a silicone? I was under the impression (and experience) that silicone doesn't hold its bond very long...

It's an acrylic lens BTW
When you next have to replace the lens, you'll find out just how tenacious that particular "silicone" is. :D

In terms of strength - bond etc. it's closer to polysulphide than the usual silicone most people are familiar with.

Trust us - use it. ;)
 

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RE: Atkins & Hoyle Hatch Repairs

Hello,

Brian Atkins, Atkins & Hoyle Ltd. Seems like there is some good debate of which glue to use when re-sealing a new lens in our hatches and ports. From the factory our hatches typically hold a seal for anywhere from 15-30 years. After which, re-installing a fresh piece of acrylic and gasket can often make the hatch look, and function like new. Follow this up with new parts which are almost all still available, and you won't be able to tell the difference between your old hatch, and a new one.

We use a silicone type product here at the factory. To get our factory quality seal, it is very important to use a cast acrylic as opposed to any other kind of Lexan or Polycarbonate. While the latter two are great at repelling bullets, they don't seem to hold up as well to UV, scratches, or the typical thermal expansion and contraction.

When installing a new piece of acrylic, we make sure to not only clean both contact surfaces (hatch frame, and new acrylic), but also prime them them using a series of chemicals we keep here at the shop.

One of our secrets is to leave the newly 'refurbished' hatch alone for at least 5 days. While the 'skin' of the silicone may have set, the silicone underneath where the bond actually occurs can still be fresh. Moving the hatch around before the silicone has a chance to harden will result in another leaky hatch.

If all of this sounds too complicated for a DIY project, feel free to get in contact with us via our website (atkinshoyle.com), or give us a call (613 354 1919), we would be happy to help.
 
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