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Discussion Starter #1
The sheaves on my Genoa track car blocks are destroyed. There is not really anything wrong with the blocks themselves, the cars, or the t-track. (Assuming that I don't care about tacking angle and sheeting length.)

So I bought some replacement sheaves... but the sheave axle on the existing hardware is ... riveted? It just shows a round head stainless steel fastener on both sides, I think the cheap plastic sheave was manufactured permanently in there.

The current plan is to center punch the sheave axle, and try to drill it out.

Anyone done this before? Should I just get a new block? A new car? A new track?

It's easy to suggest shiny expensive solutions, but I don't want a couple rotten sheaves to end up costing $400. The sheave is 1 7/16 OD and 17/32 wide.

Any ideas/ experiences here?

I am getting out the cutting oil and the drill press later this afternoon. :cool:
 

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Personally, I would try to find some used ones if you have older T-track that is thicker than the newer track. OR, if you have the slightly thinner T-track get new cars. Some can be found for as little as $100 for 1", then upwards from there if you have 1.25" track.

I just installed a line control carrs on my boat, I was toying with using the old cars, and in the end, just bought new track, had the carrs thinking I would upgrade the old ones, only to have the issue described in previous paragraph, ie thick vs thinner T part of track. Probably an easier decision for me than you to replace everything! I posted results at the end of Nov beg of dec with pics on here, or last post in this thread on another forum.

Marty
 

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I have done this many times in my life. The easy way is to drill from the rivet side (rather than the head side of the rivet) with progressively larger bits. That's the easy part.

The hard part is finding just the right length bolt; i.e. a long enough bolt with a long enough smooth shank (the portion of the bolt from the head to the threads) that no threads touch the sheave when there is a washer under the head of the bolt and a washer under the nut. You need to use a nyloc type nut and ideally on a smaller block a pan or round head machine screw.

You need to make sure not to overtighten the nut or have the bolt so loose that the cheeks of the blocks distort.

Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yea, the boat is a 1979 so I don't think I will be calling coastal recreation about it... the current plan includes a bench grinder, since the rivet is round headed on both sides... maybe a bolt and female round head nut? Not sure, but come monday I will see what is inside.
 
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