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Has anyone ever replaced their turnbuckle screws? I've looked around quite a bit for a tutorial but haven't had any luck. Anyone got any tips or advice on doing this job right?
 

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Why do you believe they need replacement?

As to your question: Assuming they're C500, C600 or similar: Unscrew the old and screw in the new? Am I missing something? :confused:

Jim
 

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Yes, they are C500s.

Maybe I'm making this harder than it should be. Is it as simple as sticking a screw driver in the turn buckle and unscrewing?
 

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I am not seeing this the UNIT is good or bad ,any dammage on the male threads would cause and issue on the female threads


The big issue on my navtec parts was the pressed in pins on some ends had gotten lose :( and were ready to fall out
 

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Yes, they are C500s.

Maybe I'm making this harder than it should be. Is it as simple as sticking a screw driver in the turn buckle and unscrewing?
Well, Navtecs are "backwards" compared to most common turnbuckles, in that, instead of two screws coupled by a body in the middle, they're two "bodies" coupled by one screw in the middle, but, essentially: Yes.

Of course: If your rig is actually, you know... up, you have to do this in such a manner that you don't bring your rig down in the process :p.

Again: Why do you believe your Navtec screws need replacing?

Btw: I use Forespar Lanocote on the threads.

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yep, rig is up. One at a time of course.

They are beginning to shows signs of corrosion.
 

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Rigging Matters: Navtec Discusses the Importance of Inspecting Rigging
http://www.navtec.net/support/riggingmatt.cfm

One item that Navtec does recommend replacing after 10 years of use or 40,000 miles (whichever comes first) is the turnbuckle screws. With the stress concentrations due to the threads, cracks could be forming that may not be noticed until they fail. The screws may last for many additional years, but it is much cheaper to replace a few rigging screws than to replace a mast and all of the rigging.Contact Navtec for further information.
 

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I found many disturbing lose pins on my Navtec parts at the red allow which could have fallen out and IMHP if the threaded rods are bad the wire must be getting tired
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks Guys. I had the rig inspected last season and he thought the rod was OK.

Catamount - are those your cottages in Boothbay? I'm up in East Boothbay for part of the Summer every year. Leaving Friday actually.
 

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rod life

On Zzzoom a C&C 35 the rod looked fine at 20 years BUT the only way I have seen is to cut the rod and reform the heads

On Zzzoom the rod would not take new heads as it had become to hard and was replaced
 

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I found many disturbing lose pins on my Navtec parts at the red allow which could have fallen out
These pins can be loose but can't fall out -- the diameters of the pins where the toggle bears is larger than the diameter of the pin where it passes through they eye on the turnbuckle.



I was fabricating a tie-rod for an inner forestay from on old turnbuckle left over after I had all of my rigging replaced. I wanted to remove the toggle to convert the thing to just an eye on the end of the turnbuckle. I tried to drive the pin out -- no go. I had to cut the pin between the eye and the toggle to get it out.

(edit: newportknots see PM for Boothbay info)
 

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make sure you lube it all before you take it apart, to prevent galling. and when you put them back together make sure you lube it to prevent galling in the future
 

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I would point out that using a screwdriver on the turnbuckle body is a really stupid idea, even if a lot of people do it. The turnbuckle bodies are not designed to resist such lateral forces and if the threads are seized, could be damaged. Most turnbuckles have a flat area that is designed for a wrench to be used on, to apply any necessary torque. Be sure to use either TefGel or Lanocote on the turnbuckle threads to help prevent corrosion or galling.
 
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