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Paragon's North Atlantic Adventure #3: Replacing the Rigging, Part 2

In this week's episode, we finished assembling our first shroud.

These are the adventures of the 42 foot sailing vessel Paragon. Join us as we voyage over 6000 nautical miles from North Carolina to Iceland and explore many exciting ports along the way.

Thank you for sailing with us,

Drake and Monique
s/v 'Paragon' (Westsail 42)

 

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I wish I could say that makes me think I could do it myself. But, what it makes me think is that it's worth paying a professional rigger to do it. :D
 
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I wish I could say that makes me think I could do it myself. But, what it makes me think is that it's worth paying a professional rigger to do it. :D
Hi Group9, I absolutely agree. I think rigging is one of those things that is the most important thing in the world to have full confidence in.

It's only after Mark and I disassembled, cleaned and rebuilt 24 Norseman fittings that I think I might be able to do it myself. Since we're sailing to places where there are no riggers (Greenland, Svalbard!) I felt that I needed to learn how to replace a shroud just in case. emergency preparedness = confidence...
 

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I've heard that it's not wise to re-use the 'wedge' portion of a norseman unless it's the only option, like an emergency spare.
 

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Seems a bit hit or miss for the wires to not get in the slots. But I'd not be afraid to try.

Looking at the design. reminds me of a "collet" used on things like high speed routers for wood working. and the large nut looks allot like a "flare nut" only the flare is a longer taper.
 

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Just watched the video. Didn't know you could get just the insert. Neat. But silicone???
On a boat???
I remember Mark recommending in one of the videos that only a certain type of silicone, with a particular smell, or lack of, was appropriate for sealing the Norseman fittings. When we took apart one of the old Norseman fittings, we found 20+ year old polysulfide caulk that was sealed so well inside the Norseman that it never even cured in all of those years.
 

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Hi Group9, I absolutely agree. I think rigging is one of those things that is the most important thing in the world to have full confidence in.

It's only after Mark and I disassembled, cleaned and rebuilt 24 Norseman fittings that I think I might be able to do it myself. Since we're sailing to places where there are no riggers (Greenland, Svalbard!) I felt that I needed to learn how to replace a shroud just in case. emergency preparedness = confidence...
I don't blame you for wanting to do it yourself. And, when cruising, it would definitely be a really good skill set to have. :)
 

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Butyl rubber is a far better choice for using inside a mechanical terminal and it is important that it squeezes out the top to make sure water does not enter inside the terminal. Forget silicone even if it does not have vinegar in it.
 

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You don't have much choice reusing the comes with Norsemans as they are no longer made and replacement cones are NLA. Hopefully someone will step up and start supplying cones so all of us Norseman users can redo our rigs without having to buy new terminals. Have redone a couple of terminals with the old cones without any problems.

Norseman/StaLoks are pretty simple to use, just follow the instructions. First boat I rigged with Norseman's did as complete novice. Took a lot of time on the first fitting making sure everything was right, disassembled it a couple of times to check it out. After doing two or three was pumping them out only taking a couple of minutes to install. That boat had 30+ terminals to rig and did it in a day. Sailed that boat to SoPac and back so guess I learned quickly.



I've heard that it's not wise to re-use the 'wedge' portion of a norseman unless it's the only option, like an emergency spare.
 

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Roverhi, That is terrible news about Norseman. I had no idea the cones were no longer available. I have reused cones before as they did not look worthy of throwing away, but certainly now there is no choice. Thanks for the info.
 

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Yeah, it was a surprise to me to. Apparently they've been out of production for several years and any old stock of cones have been used up. Tried a number of sources for 6mm and 7mm cones with no luck. Most places had no stock but a few had a some left but only in limited sizes.

Roverhi, That is terrible news about Norseman. I had no idea the cones were no longer available. I have reused cones before as they did not look worthy of throwing away, but certainly now there is no choice. Thanks for the info.
 

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My wife just checked and it seems on Amazon, searching for "Norseman cones" they came up. They are made by Tylaska, whoever that is, but they are located in Connecticut. 10mm cost $13 each and 8mm cost $9 each...plus a lot for shipping. I am ordering a bunch, just in case.
 
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