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Not sure if anyone can help but thought I'd give it a try!
We bought an old life boat for sailing around the canals and are currently mid refurb.

The inside has boxed wooden seating along the side and at the bow and stern, and it used to have a plastic trim which we are currently replacing with wood.
We are really struggling to attach the wood to the inside bow curve.
So far we have tried to cut the wood strips along the inside edge to add flexibility to it, but this snapped as soon as we screwed it down.

Does anyone have any recommendations of what to do here?

Previously it was made from plastic and had been screwed in place, but this was really uneven and didn't look great (if only we'd know how hard it would be to try and fix we might have just left it as is!)
Ideally we just want to cover the join of seatfiberglass as it's currently a bit of a mess!
Photo below shows a bit more context (we have only managed to add trim up to the flatest part of the curve) but any ideas/suggestions would be grateful welcomed!

(Sorry it's the best photo I have at the moment)
139359
 

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you might have a few options:

Rather than using one long piece and bending to fit the shape try using three, four or more pieces, each having a portion of the shape and join the ends with a dowel screw, domino, biscuit, dowel, the choice will depend on the wood dimension. Glue together using epoxy, for example total boat, west system or something similar.... sand and fair, prep for paint

Another option would be to use several thin strips glued/epoxied together and create a laminate, either laminate in place or make a jig...jig would be easier to just clamp in place

Hopefully that gives you some options to consider...
 

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You can set up a steaming rig fairly easily using a piece of PVC pipe and a tea kettle. Steamed mahogany will bend like a noodle.

Teak doesn’t respond to steaming as well as mahogany, but you could laminate thin strips and bend to shape on a form that’s the same shape as the curve in the bow.

Also, air dried wood tends to steam better and splinter less than kiln dried wood.
 

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What kind of wood are you using? As Quickstep suggests, some types bend more easily than others. The simplest solution may be to cut thin strips and laminate them in place with glue or epoxy. Perhaps 8mm (it looks like you're in the Netherlands) or 1/4" if you're using cedar or pine. Thinner if you're using oak or some other hardwood. Holding them all in place at once while the glue sets can be a challenge. Cutting them a little wide would enable you to plane down wayward strips afterwards, or you could just glue one or two at a time and be careful. Steaming thicker pieces is another solution, but there is a trade-off in the time it takes to build and use your steam box. I have boiled oak strips to make laminated kayak stems, but your pieces would be difficult to fit into a stovetop pot. People sometimes make wood more pliable by wrapping it with rags and pouring boiling water on it, though it is not as efficient or quick as steaming.
 

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A few more quick thoughts:
1) As others have suggested, your best bet is to laminate the pieces out of veneers. Depending on the radius the veneers may need to be as thin as 4 MM and but may be as thick as 8mm.
2) The wood should be laminated with epoxy or resorcinol glue. Resorcinol needs to be tight joints or it will fail. Thickened epoxy is more forgiving.
3) It is very hard to bend wood to an inside curve (i.e. concave shape). You would be way ahead of the game by taking some OSB or particle board and cutting out a male mold, and then bending the veneers over the male mold.. In doing so, don't forget to make holes in the OSB that can be used to clamp the laminations together. If the mold is wide enough relative to the veneers, you can also add block that align the veneers the other way.
4) Choose a wood that is rot resistant and glues up well. That is a little difficult since really rot resistant species tend not to glue up very well. Species that have some rot resistance and glue up well might include Western Red Cedar, Spanish Cedar, African Mahogany, Cypress, Sapele, Pacific Maple, Amoora, and Angelique (Basralocus).
5) kiln dried lumber (lumber yard lumber) is typically too dry to ben easily. Air dried higher moister
6) Joe Dunn's suggestion might work on a house, but is not a great solution for a boat.
Jeff
 
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