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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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Rigging is engineered for the loads that they need to deal with and the amount of stretch that they are expected to be able to tolerate and pass onto the other components of the rig. (nags, chainplates, etc.) Oversizing standing rigging is rarely a good idea since in theory that imparts higher loadings into the other elements of the rig that they were not necessarily designed to resist. The cyclical higher loadings can do damage over time.

Jeff
 

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Administrator
Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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10,086 Posts
I have to figure it's a matter of how much force you need to apply to to get the proper tension, and I have to think that's more a matter of how long is the shroud then how long is the boat.

Curlew is 37' overall, but she's a ketch with fairly short masts.
If the assumption is that the original rigging was sized properly, then you would want reverse engineer to use a Dyneema line with similar stretch characteristics to the stainless steel that it replaced. If a corresponding sized Dyneema does not exist, then you may be forced to use a larger size. In an ideal world, you would then want to increase the tangs and chainplates and their bolts accordingly.

Jeff
 
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