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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
About 10 years ago I fixed up an inlaw apartment that had a old time ship theme. I used variant of mahogany that was only a dollar a lineal foot for 1 x 4.

I have since taken over the space as an office and have ambitions of making some desks that look like chart tables.

The wood is still available but now costs twice as much.
To make the slats you see in the picture I re-sawed the boards with my table saw. That way I got two pieces about 5/16" x 3.5"

I would like to do that trick again but the table saw idea wasn't the best idea to start with so I don't think I'll go that way again. It was a little scary.

I see that bandsaws are not too expensive now. My experience with bandsaws was 30 year ago on 3 phase commercial equipment.

So my question to you guys who have kept up with this sort of thing is what is the smallest bandsaw, wheel, throat and HP with which I could resaw the 1 x 4's
and work well?
 

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I don't think a band saw will work, I think on something that will be standing 4" tall you would need serious hp and that means not something you could use at home.
 

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Using a bandsaw with a resaw blade (wide blade) is the best way to cut down wood. The problem which was stated above is it requires some power. I've always done it on commercial machines. That being said i think a "Jet" home machine would do it if you use a quality blade and you feed at a steady, slow pace.

The physics of bandsaw resawing
 

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David I've been re sawing 4 x 4 beech into 3x3s using a 4 tpi x 1/2" blade on my Delta 14" Band saw. It's hard to get good results if the band saw is out of tune I've been lucky so far. but by time it's planed with the thickness planer.. may as well use the table saw.
 

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David I've been re sawing 4 x 4 beech into 3x3s using a 4 tpi x 1/2" blade on my Delta 14" Band saw. It's hard to get good results if the band saw is out of tune I've been lucky so far. but by time it's planed with the thickness planer.. may as well use the table saw.
Very true
It's best to have a quality saw with quality guides set very close to the wood. Jigs help to.

You will most likely have to run it thru a planer anyway. save your money and get a quality thin kerf blade (or 2) for ripping. Just remember to not get the blade hot. cut a little at a time. I've done this many times.
 

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Hi, David. Bandsaws are great for resawing, since they remove less stock than a typical TS blade, are relatively safe (no kickback), and can get by with less HP than you need driving a 10" circular blade. But serious resawing demands a dedicated blade -- lotsa hook, large gullets, extra wide -- plus excellent guides & back bearings to prevent beam deflection, plus a tall fence that can be skewed to correct for blade lead, and a saw with frame & wheel bearings up to the sort of high tension needed to resaw clealy. That usually means about a 17" steel frame saw with roller guides & 2hp motor. And you'll still need a thickness planer to clean up the sawn faces & account for blade wander.

I do a bit of resawing on my big Grizzly bandsaw, but for anything narrower than 5", the tablesaw is my tool of choice. Forrest Woodworker2 blades, thin kerf (3/32"), 30-40 teeth ATB: it'll change your life.;) I own about six of them. No blade stiffener needed. Here's the trick: set your blade height just over half board width & resaw in two passes, with the same face against your fence. One pass, flip board end for end, second pass. A featherboard just in front of the blade (not even with it, but in FRONT of it!) will help give consistent results. You may still get a bit of offset on the two passes, due to internal tension in the wood. Run the inner faces thru the planer, it goes away.

I resaw tons of wood on the TS this way. In fact, I'm starting a curved bar that will have about 50 sqft of 4"w lapstrake white oak planking, resawn to 5/16". It'll all be done on the Powermatic66.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Looks like back to the tablesaw it is then with a better blade and feather board.
Sometimes commercial techniques just don't work with homeowner equipment so I'll give up on the bandsaw idea.
I don't have a thickness planer but only need one clean side so hopefully I'll be OK.
It worked out ok the last time.

Thanks everyone.
 

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Better late than never.

At home, under 4in I use my table saw. Band saws of the non-commercial size are great for curves, not so much for re-sawing.
 

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I have a Grizzly 14" bandsaw that's been heavily modified to increase accuracy. But for small stuff like 4", I use the table saw with a Freud thin kerf teflon blade. The technique that bobmcgov describes is spot on and a perfectly safe technique but I'll stress that you must use a push stick in lieu of your hands. Say that 15 times. Don't bother buying one, you can make one in 15 minutes. Two sticks are shown at the top of the picture in the photo below.

The 4 board veneer panel below was made from a single 5/4 cherry board using a table saw and thickness planer. The panel became the bureau top in the bottom picture. I used the same technique for the cabinet sides.


Finished Cherry bureau
 

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you could surface the board with hand planes David. I never ever thought I'd try it but when I "tuned" the old hand planes I have. and even a cheap "buck bros" low angle white metal plane. I was getting "curls" and near ankle deep in them when I surfaced this.


it was hard and took about 6 hrs total but worked quite well. It's 12" X 6'6" beech with mahogany edge boards. 1/2 of the roubo style work bench top I'm slowly building.. yes my hands still hurt LOL
see my beloved little Stanley 93 in the back?
 

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thank you... thank you very much! ... :) It's hard work.. makes one really appreciate how they did things back before power tools were invented. Blades of the hand planes have to razor sharp! and the sole of the planes were hand sanded on the cast iron jointer surface to get them flat as possible. Made a world of difference! Oh.. and wax .. makes them slide much more easily across the wood.
 

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I have a 14" Laguna bandsaw (3hp) with a 1" resaw blade.
I wouldn't hesitate to resaw 4" mahogany with it. (I've done 10" white oak with success)
Might need a little sanding, but probably be be fine without.
(Set the fence up for drift and use a featherboard)
sam :)
 

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David,
I have a 14" Jet Bandsaw with a riser block that's just set up for re-sawing - which means a resaw fence, bearing guides and the saw is modified for better dust collection (resawing generates a LOT of dust).

Unless you're going to be doing a lot of this work I wouldn't bother. Use the table saw with a good quality blade as others have suggested.

If you don't have a thickness planer to clean up the sawn faces call around to local lumber yards. The old time yards all have thickness planers and will quote you a rate for small jobs. No additional tools required and all boards the same thickness. :D

Jim
 
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I resawed cherry on my 16 inch Walker Turner with a 3/4 inch resaw blade. I'm using the cherry to finish the interior of my boat. Give this guy a call and explain what you want to do.
Woodcraftbands.com

I ordered the blades from him and was not disappointed.
 
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check out Lee Valley Tools.

Started in the 80's by a retired civil servant who could not find the high quality tools he needed in North America. Started importing from Europe.
 
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