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Hello,

I plan on buying a rescue sling for my new-to-me boat. On my other boats have used the LifeSling - for no other reason than I saw a lot of LifeSling units on other boats.


Over the years the cover will deteriorate but you can buy a new one for not that much money

Now I'm checking on Defender, and I see this one:

It's $60 (vs $174) and looks just like the LifeSling. I like to save money, but I also want something that will work when I need it. The Lalizas looks just about the same as the LifeSling.

Does anyone have experience the Lalizas? Any comments pro / con?

Thanks,
Barry
 

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We have a Lifesling. We purchased it about 20 years ago and have luckily not had to use it. It seems like a good tool for getting the MOB back alongside. The Lalizas seems like it would do the same thing. So would a lifejacket tied to a line. But that wouldn't come in a neat storage bag that hangs on the pushpit, ready to be used. Getting the MOB back aboard is the issue that comes up after you have them back alongside. The Lifesling and Lalizas slings look like people could slip out of them when you tried to hoist them aboard, especially if they are tired or unconscious. We got a sailmaker (Gambell And Hunter Sailmakers - Quality Classic and Cruising Sails) to make us a MOB retriever parbuckle tarp. It is a triangle of sailcloth that clips two corners to stanchion bases. The third corner has a line that you lead under and outboard of the victim and then back to a cabintop winch. You then winch the vicim aboard. Tired and weak crew should still be able to get a 300 pound victim back aboard with this setup. This video shows how the idea works, though it uses a fancier 'tarp': MRT - Marine Rescue Technologies
 

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Over the years the cover will deteriorate but you can buy a new one for not that much money
Just spending more of your money, but the hard cover never deteriorates.

Lifesling type products are good, but also limited. They stay attached to the boat, so you can circle the victim and they could presumably grab ahold. It requires the victim to be conscious and have dexterity. Then you still need to get them aboard.

If I could only have one rescue device, I think I'd have an emergency MOB unit (a MOM* or JonBuoy) that either had a hard pole or an inflatable pole to help locate the victim in the first place. Never finding them is the bigger risk.
 
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Our MOB pole buoy and strobe are both connected to our horseshoe buoy to make finding the victim easier - and to give them something to help them stay afloat. The Lifesling is for after you've found them.
 

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Our MOB pole buoy and strobe are both connected to our horseshoe buoy to make finding the victim easier - and to give them something to help them stay afloat. The Lifesling is for after you've found them.
I have my MOB pole connected to my lifesling so that as soon as someone goes overboard both can be deployed. The swimmer can then locate the pole and find the lifesling attached. The lifesling has enough buoyancy to keep them afloat, and the mob pole makes them easy to find, and get hold of the rope by grabbing the pole.

We also carry a life ring and a heaving line.

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I have my MOB pole connected to my lifesling so that as soon as someone goes overboard both can be deployed. The swimmer can then locate the pole and find the lifesling attached. The lifesling has enough buoyancy to keep them afloat, and the mob pole makes them easy to find, and get hold of the rope by grabbing the pole.

We also carry a life ring and a heaving line.

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This is very bad practice.

The rope on the Lifesling is only 120 feet long. That's about 8 seconds at 8 knots. Try jumping off the boat in foul weather gear, with and inflated PFD. Go in backwards. Jump well to the side, as though you were thrown. Tell the crew to wait 5 seconds to throw the Lifesling. That will give you about 8 seconds to swim (5x13.8)=69 feet. What will happen is the rope will pull the Lifesling and MOB pole away from you long before you can swim to it.

The MOB pole should be separt. In a PERFECT world the boat is going very slow (why did you fall off in such conditions?) and you can swim to the Lifesling before the boat pulls it out of reach, but that is VERY unlikely to happen. Try it, but remember, the crew is NOT allowed to have the Lifesling ready to throw or be sitting with their hands on it. There needs to be some delay, even a few seconds before they start, and a few more seconds before it starts playing out. assume the boat is NOT quickly stopped but continues straight for 20 seconds or so.

This is why MOB poles or horse shoes are NOT tethered to the boat. The life sling is to collect the person, once you get it under control and can maneuver slowly.
 

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This is very bad practice.

The rope on the Lifesling is only 120 feet long. That's about 8 seconds at 8 knots. Try jumping off the boat in foul weather gear, with and inflated PFD. Go in backwards. Jump well to the side, as though you were thrown. Tell the crew to wait 5 seconds to throw the Lifesling. That will give you about 8 seconds to swim (5x13.8)=69 feet. What will happen is the rope will pull the Lifesling and MOB pole away from you long before you can swim to it.

The MOB pole should be separt. In a PERFECT world the boat is going very slow (why did you fall off in such conditions?) and you can swim to the Lifesling before the boat pulls it out of reach, but that is VERY unlikely to happen. Try it, but remember, the crew is NOT allowed to have the Lifesling ready to throw or be sitting with their hands on it. There needs to be some delay, even a few seconds before they start, and a few more seconds before it starts playing out. assume the boat is NOT quickly stopped but continues straight for 20 seconds or so.

This is why MOB poles or horse shoes are NOT tethered to the boat. The life sling is to collect the person, once you get it under control and can maneuver slowly.
Couldn't agree more. MOB pole and lifesling serve two different purposes, with very little overlap (locating vs recovering). By tying them together there is a danger that both become nearly useless.
 

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To me the value if the lifesling is strictly limited to it use as a sling to raise a person from the water.

The proposed recovery process of deploying the sling behind the boat and then maneuvering the boat in several circles around the MOB I have found simply nutty. If this is an intent, I would encourage you to live practice once.

Bringing the boat next to a MOB and stopping under sail should be a well practiced exercise and much quicker than any flunky attempt to complete several circles in between.

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To me the value if the lifesling is strictly limited to it use as a sling to raise a person from the water.

The proposed recovery process of deploying the sling behind the boat and then maneuvering the boat in several circles around the MOB I have found simply nutty. If this is an intent, I would encourage you to live practice once.

Bringing the boat next to a MOB and stopping under sail should be a well practiced exercise and much quicker than any flunky attempt to complete several circles in between.

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Well said... But my "live" experience has been different. We'll have to disagree.

  • Yes, I can manuver my boat to a stop... but other crew cannot. Stating that this procedure must be well practiced assumes a well trained, full crew, with cross training. That's assuming much.
  • No, you do not have to circle. If the wind is blowing (It's blowing like stink for a serious MOB), simply passing close to windward slowly, and then letting the boat and gear drift down, is enough.
Yes, nothing beats practice. But there must be enough wind to cause drift.
 

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This is very bad practice.

The rope on the Lifesling is only 120 feet long. That's about 8 seconds at 8 knots. Try jumping off the boat in foul weather gear, with and inflated PFD. Go in backwards. Jump well to the side, as though you were thrown. Tell the crew to wait 5 seconds to throw the Lifesling. That will give you about 8 seconds to swim (5x13.8)=69 feet. What will happen is the rope will pull the Lifesling and MOB pole away from you long before you can swim to it.

The MOB pole should be separt. In a PERFECT world the boat is going very slow (why did you fall off in such conditions?) and you can swim to the Lifesling before the boat pulls it out of reach, but that is VERY unlikely to happen. Try it, but remember, the crew is NOT allowed to have the Lifesling ready to throw or be sitting with their hands on it. There needs to be some delay, even a few seconds before they start, and a few more seconds before it starts playing out. assume the boat is NOT quickly stopped but continues straight for 20 seconds or so.

This is why MOB poles or horse shoes are NOT tethered to the boat. The life sling is to collect the person, once you get it under control and can maneuver slowly.
Did I say the MOB was tethered to the boat? The lifesling is tethered to the mob pole. Both are in a position where they can be deployed in seconds.

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Well said... But my "live" experience has been different. We'll have to disagree.

  • Yes, I can manuver my boat to a stop... but other crew cannot. Stating that this procedure must be well practiced assumes a well trained, full crew, with cross training. That's assuming much.
  • No, you do not have to circle. If the wind is blowing (It's blowing like stink for a serious MOB), simply passing close to windward slowly, and then letting the boat and gear drift down, is enough.
Yes, nothing beats practice. But there must be enough wind to cause drift.
I aqgree 100% that the MOB procedure should be as simple as possible and well practiced. Simple to me means a procedure where the crew makesas few decisions a possible, say like

A procedure where anyone is expected to return the boat to windward of the MOB, sail a right angle and then drift patiently seems a lot to expect of anyone, especially if you assume under sail. If the procedure means lowering the sails and proceeding under power, then a crew maneuvering the boat under power with a long line in the water, seems a formula for the worse possible outcome, namely total loss of boat control. I dont see it...
 

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Did I say the MOB was tethered to the boat? The lifesling is tethered to the mob pole. Both are in a position where they can be deployed in seconds.

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I had a funny feeling this is what you meant. However, standard installation of a lifesling, is to tether it to the boat. What you have, in the end, is essentially a horseshoe with an pole tethered to it, which would a lot cheaper than a lifesling.
 

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I had a funny feeling this is what you meant. However, standard installation of a lifesling, is to tether it to the boat. What you have, in the end, is essentially a horseshoe with an pole tethered to it, which would a lot cheaper than a lifesling.
Yes, but I have had the lifesling for many years, so I thought that would be a good application for it.

We also have a life ring that IS tethered to the boat. (Horseshoes are not coast guard approved in Canada). I hate the lifering, but every year we have Coast Guard Courtesy inspections, and every year they won't sign off until they see the lifering tethered to the boat!

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We also have a life ring that IS tethered to the boat. (Horseshoes are not coast guard approved in Canada).
I like the look of a lifering on the rail, better than a horseshoe, but I just can't get my head around why various CGs care which you have. Seems antiquated and/or bureaucratic. Especially tethered to the boat, which as others have pointed out, does little good, until after you've found a conscious victim.
 

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Did I say the MOB was tethered to the boat? The lifesling is tethered to the mob pole. Both are in a position where they can be deployed in seconds.

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"I have my MOB pole connected to my lifesling," and the Life sling is connected to the boat, so yes, that is how we read that.
If you simply mean they are next to each other on the rail, that's cool. Just not connected.
 

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If you simply mean they are next to each other on the rail, that's cool. Just not connected.
Seems he is saying the pole is connected to the part of the lifesling that is usually connected to the boat. The whole unit goes over. Unconventional.
 

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I aqgree 100% that the MOB procedure should be as simple as possible and well practiced. Simple to me means a procedure where the crew makesas few decisions a possible, say like

A procedure where anyone is expected to return the boat to windward of the MOB, sail a right angle and then drift patiently seems a lot to expect of anyone, especially if you assume under sail. If the procedure means lowering the sails and proceeding under power, then a crew maneuvering the boat under power with a long line in the water, seems a formula for the worse possible outcome, namely total loss of boat control. I dont see it...
Agreed. You don't see it. Others find the method quite useful.

Every boat and crew is different. It sounds like you have something that works for you and you have drilled it. Excellent and enough said. Stay with what you've got.
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To me, the main benifit of the Lifesling (or one of several similar units) is keep in contact with the victim, after contact is established, but without having to frantically cling to wet hands and clothes while enough helpers are poitioned. Many MOB recoveries have gone wrong at that point. Once the victim reaches the Lifesling, you have time to workout the details without panic.
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This dollar store version dreamed up by a Japanese Coast Guard officer is interesting. I made one and tested it, out of curiosity (all stuff I had on the might-need pile, so free to me) and it really worked quite well.
 

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Are there any stat's from actual MOB recoveries that could indicate one system over others?
 

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