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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I have acquired a 21' San Juan from my uncle. It has not been used in years. The last time I saw it about 5 years ago it needed a few minor things and a clean/ paint job. I also know it did not have a motor. I plan to inspect it next week on the trailer. I know some of the basic things but what specifically should I look at to make sure it is ready to be put in the water? There is no buying process for this I just want to make sure it is sea worthy.

we have not put it in the water either so I do not know if it will even float. Any suggestions of what to do before or once it is in the water so that it does not sink?

Thanks
 

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Put in the water, go sailing...simple boat...figure out what needs to be done after using it. Bought a SJ 23 in an auction in Seattle .many years ago..sailed the god out of this little boat.....didn't die..moved up to a bigger boat...now sailing the world.....
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks,

Did you use an outboard? My only concern is getting it on and off the trailer and maybe motoring away from the docks. What hp would you recommend and do you know reliable places to get used ones?
 

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3 hp Yamaha should suffice.. but really, a pair of oars would work on this boat...just dink around your your local harbor...., don't go to far...it's a day sailor, small cooler, a few beers, sunshine, your gal, priceless....
 

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Launching a swing keel boat on most any ramp is easy-peasy, as my granddaughter would say.

Stepping the rig for the first time is another thing - it would be good to get some (hopefully experienced) help for that, at least to start. There will be plenty of on-line resources for hints and procedures.

For a boat that size, a 4-6 hp outboard would be fine, less if all you will do is motor out of the launch area and daysail.. if you intend weekending and the occasional vacation then a 6 hp would be better - plus at 4 hp and up you generally get fwd/neutral/reverse gears, not always on the smaller ones. The new 4 strokes are pretty quiet to run.

Like Aev said, launch it and learn it.. after one season you'll know what she really needs to have done, and have a much better idea if what your priorities will really be. A paint job is not likely at the top of the list for starters.

Oh - and: seen this?

http://sj21class.org/
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I would rather not have a motor at all. Is it fairly easy to get back on the trailer without one? I figure you could put the trailer further into the water and use a bow line to pull it I just haven't seen anyone do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you Faster. Back when I did step the mast so I know I am good there, would like to get a better system to be able to do it myself. Thankfully I know quite a bit about sailing I just have not had experience of doing work on it.
 

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Educate yourself on sailing Rules of Navigation and best safety practices. Make sure your outboard mounting bracket is sound and secure. Put the boat in water. Keep it tied to a dock or even to the trailer. Get on board and check for leaks. Deploy the swing keel and retrieve it. Know what a jibe is and how to avoid an unintentional jibe. Go sailing. Return to shore and fix things that are broken.
 

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I would rather not have a motor at all. Is it fairly easy to get back on the trailer without one? I figure you could put the trailer further into the water and use a bow line to pull it I just haven't seen anyone do it.
Put yer back into it mate! Piece o piss to haul that up with a bit o line....yer sheilas could do it while yer drinking a can of suds..
 
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yes, back the trailer into the water deep enough to float the boat above it. Attach the winch cable (or, better, webbing) to the boweye. Drive forward slowly.

BTW, this is how to do it with every boat. One should NEVER goose the engine to get a boat up onto a trailer. It destroys the lake bottom at the end of the concrete ramp, and that causes problems retrieving trailers and hastens the degradation of the concrete. I learned that in the boaters' education course required by the state in which I sail.
 
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