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AP
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any advice is greatly appreciated. I am in a very windy narrow marina (Pacific coast). I have a Catalina 22 MkII. When in my slip bow in first, the wind typically is crossing the port side of my bow, so upwind slip with a port to starboard crosswind. When i exit I need to reverse out and head down the marina channel port side, so the wind is trying push my bow and boat the opposite way i need to go. Prop walk kicks my stern to port too when shifting into reverse. My challenge besides poor skill is trying to keep control of boat and bow when shifting from reverse to forward in that moment when i have no speed. I have a Honda BF5 5 HP outboard. I recently bought the boat and after reading online i plan to walk the boat out of the slip to keep the bow on the port side in the correct direction and use an aft spring line to help pivot the boat. Or I may try to reverse the boat into the slip so i'm exiting bow first, regardless I'm hoping to learn any good outboard motoring advice if i do need to reverse out the slip in this situation/condition to understand where best to position the boat and rudder at that critical point shifting from reverse to forward.
 

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One of None
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this could sound goofy, but...

If I copy correctly, both your prop, and the wind, rotate you to starboard when you want/need to either back up straight, or maybe rotatr to port a little?

Can you run a taut line along the port side of your slip, paralleling the port side of your boat? Install a tag line with a block (or snatch block) onto that first line. Then temporarily fasten the tag line to your port bow or port "shoulder", while you back out. It holds your bow against the crosswind, while it runs along the long line as you back out. Then let go the tag line.

All this may require a second person as crew, though you might try some kind of quick release for singlehanding. When you come back in, if you can snare it, it'll do the same thing. But it sounds as though you mostly need this for backing out.

Just a thought...
 

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Master Mariner
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It might just be easier to back out and do a complete turn backing and filling, rather than try to go for the short cut when conditions make that difficult. In other words, backing to port (if I understand which way the conditions and prop walk take your stern) all the way around, rather than trying to fight your boat and the elements.
A well executed but longer turn, might seem untidy, but the goal is to always have your boat under control, not just when conditions are ideal.
 
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AP
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
capta, thanks. I would do that but the fairway is too narrow. I think I just don't perform the maneuver enough to be familiar with how my boat will respond and simply need to practice in the harbor motoring around shifting, turning, steering in reverse all over etc. Then i'll either reverse in, walk the boat out or maybe be able to make the turn reversing out.
 

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One of None
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"Thank you to all that responded". "you're welcome"
 

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Im assuming swing keel? Is your keel up or down while you are doing this maneuver. If you put your keel down, then your pivot point will move forward and it will increase your lateral resistance. So definitely keel down. If you're keel is already down, that won't help.

The next trick is to park your rudder for the turn and actually turn your outboard a full 90 degrees. By using your outboard instead of your rudder you will eliminate the inefficiency off the rudder and direct your thrust exactly where it needs to go. You'll turn much faster. If your outboard is fixed forward or impossible to reach, this might not help.
 

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Im assuming swing keel? Is your keel up or down while you are doing this maneuver. If you put your keel down, then your pivot point will move forward and it will increase your lateral resistance. So definitely keel down. If you're keel is already down, that won't help.

The next trick is to park your rudder for the turn and actually turn your outboard a full 90 degrees. By using your outboard instead of your rudder you will eliminate the inefficiency off the rudder and direct your thrust exactly where it needs to go. You'll turn much faster. If your outboard is fixed forward or impossible to reach, this might not help.
When we had a O'Day 23 we had it in a cross wind and cross current slip . Finally I set it up so I could turn the motor, it was like a stern thruster . It worked very well . Now we have a inboard and are back in almost the same spot, slip (cross wind/current) and it is very difficult to back out . Bummer !
 

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1968 Columbia 50
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I grew up on a Cat 22, we had the same issue as you do, we were also constrained by depth so we could not lower the swing keel. We would leave the keel partially down, and use short bursts of the engine, just enough to get the boat moving, the keel would act as a rudder of sorts, and keep the boat tracking in a straighter line. Using the engine, which we could rotate, we would apply short bursts of power how we needed them, leaving the engine powered in gear would only exasperate the prop walk. In windier conditions we would do as DeniseO30 brought up, and used a spring line, it worked very well. Sometimes we would just walk the boat out with a spring line attached...
 
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