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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been offered a sloop for a trade
Priced at 8900
There is no info on any owner made reviews of these boats,
I've checked out the cascade forum too

The main info I find is about a man who regrettably sold one to a kid who spent all summer addressing sponge and rot,
he took it out & was hit by an easterly in michigan and was grounded hard,
The boat had to be cut up and removed, but for months it took a lot of pounding before the area around the propeller shaft cracked open on rock.
You can find the article it was named the falcon

from what I can tell the fiberglass was overbuilt on these hulls because they were one of the first fiberglass sailboats to be out in production.

Lots of stringer and hand laid with 50% resin to composite ratio

They were designed by Geiger to be a comfortable boat for 4 to sleep well with a big galley and big cockpit.

Chime in if you can put some experience down for your owner ship or water time on these.

Would like to hear about long distance endurance and how well they fair and point etc storm conditions.
This one is very nice although I don't like the centerboard design on The keel

Link of said boat
http://seattle.craigslist.org/oly/bod/4829631881.html
 

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Courtney the Dancer
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I love those old Chinooks, great lines and from the little I know they were built like tanks. Only sailed one once (on the Columbia), as I recall it went along nicely on a tack in 10-15 knots of wind. The hull is probably the last thing you need to worry about but being that old a good out of water survey would put your mind at ease. I would take a close look at the wiring, plumbing, etc. Wet climate, and '62 was a while ago. Looks like a nice boat, interior is basic but there have been some nice improvements made (furling, etc).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Thanks for the info
It seems to be a very good boat but does need some issues as far as deck work

I've also been offered a trade on a 79 10.7 Columbia
It needs new bottom paint, ropes and seat cushions but otherwise a blue water boat I've been told, I'm leaning towards that one
 

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One of None
Hunter 34
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Suggest you do more homework and if you have not seen the boat up close and personal, take someone with you that knows what they are looking at.

No mention of the bottom, keel, rudder, keel bolts and general condition of the bottom says to me; get it hauled and surveyed!

It is a very old boat!

The photos really do not give a representation of the whole boat either.
 

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al brazzi
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2,088 Posts
Thanks for the info
It seems to be a very good boat but does need some issues as far as deck work

I've also been offered a trade on a 79 10.7 Columbia
It needs new bottom paint, ropes and seat cushions but otherwise a blue water boat I've been told, I'm leaning towards that one
We had a smaller Columbia a few years ago and while nit the cleanest hull design was great down wind, space was abundant and extremely well built I'm sure an entirely different and newer boat than the Chinook. Its all about the condition there are so many old boats out there that need so much refitting you can easily double or triple the sale price in that range. Be careful.
With the right boat and a willingness to restore the possibilities are endless.
Amazing to me when they started building boats from Fiberglass they had no idea how long the materials would last, now sometimes that's all that's left that's serviceable.
 

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I know this is an old thread but I wanted to say that I have one and it is a great boat. I don't know what hull speed it would be but it cruises great at 10-12 kts. Mine was in great condition despite it's age. I have had to make many upgrades but that is due to the previous owner being an idiot rather than something wrong with the boat itself. It is a blue water boat but an early one when then built boats and then put an interior in them. Now-a-days they build out the interior and then try and wrap a boat around it. So it is sparse for galley upgrades but some creativity will yield great results.
 

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I know this is an old thread but I wanted to say that I have one and it is a great boat. I don't know what hull speed it would be but it cruises great at 10-12 kts. Mine was in great condition despite it's age. I have had to make many upgrades but that is due to the previous owner being an idiot rather than something wrong with the boat itself. It is a blue water boat but an early one when then built boats and then put an interior in them. Now-a-days they build out the interior and then try and wrap a boat around it. So it is sparse for galley upgrades but some creativity will yield great results.
With a LWL of 23ft you have a theoretical hull speed of 6.42 knots. Achieving 10+ knots on regular basis means I'd definitely like you to teach me a few things about sail trim.
 

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So Jeff what your saying is the chinook will hobbie horse through the chop? Which boat would you recommend then the chinook or the Columbia 10.7?
How about the older cals, 2-30, 2-29, 31?? Or an older Morgan 35 or Pearson 10m? I believe we all respect your knowledgeable opinion on this site. I watched you on you tube with yab-yum and that was a good learning experience for me for someone who's been a small boat sailer and wants to get into cruising on a small budget. Thank you john
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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While the Chinooks have absolutely beautiful hulls (to look at) and Fred Geiger was an exceptionally skilled designer, when it comes to what we now understand about seakeeping and motion comfort the Chinooks do just about everything wrong. They have very short water lines which would cause them to pitch more excessively than ideal. The have full bows so waves would tend to impart more energy into the boat further increasing the tendency to pitch and also increasing the impacts felt by the crew. They have pinched sterns which reduce the ability to dampen pitch. They have very deep canoe bodies, probably negative form stability, and almost no keel area, minimizing damping and allowing large roll angles (albeit slower than a boat with a lot of form stability). The centerboard when down does provide some damping, but apparently quite a few of the glass boats were built without the centerboard.

The Columbia 10.7 was a strange hull form in terms of motion. I really have never quite understood what they were trying to do there. They have a strange bow, and an exaggerated wine glass section which in theory should be okay, yet in actual practice, do not have a comfortable motion.

I think that the Cal 2-29 and Cal 30-2 make nice coastal cruisers sailing very well for their era, and having a decent build quality.

Purely on subjective grounds I have always had a soft spot in my heart for the 1960's era Morgan 34. These were exceptional boats for their day. They were built in a number of configurations. In the best of all worlds you can find a tall rig, with the skeg hung rudder and bronze centerboard. I am not as much of a fan of the Morgan 35, although they are probably faster, have a nicer layout, and might have a better motion than the 34.

Of all of the boats that you mention, the Pearson 10M is probably the best sailor of the bunch, and another boat that I have always thought of as a great value. Build quality appears to have varied throughout their production run and some seem really crudely put together while others have surprised me with how nice the glass work appears and how solid they feel.

Thank you for the kind words on the 'Sailing Nervous' videos.

Jeff
 

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al brazzi
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To confirm a bit of Jeff's comments I had a Columbia 8.3 a scaled version of the 10.7 Allan Payne design. Very nice comfortable Boat in normal conditions would go downwind well and stern anchor like a champ. She would however fell like she was hitting the brakes going upwind in a chop. Underwater profile much like a container ship. Sailed only in the Chesapeake bay. But the interior space was maximized and a bit more spacious than my 30 footer I'm in now. Pearson had an interesting helm position far forward on these Boats which worked well on a P30 we raced years ago, the main trimmer was behind the helm lots of leverage on the boom, it just worked well. Hope this helps.
 
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