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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Thanks again for all the advice. I can't wait to go up.

Knothead - where are you out of? Any other riggers online here?
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
UPDATE: Topclimber arrived today.

My new (to me) top climber arrived today, complete with an 83 foot line. the whole thing stunk of mildew, so I'm using my secret (see below) smell removal technique on the climber, the rope and the case. I did notice that the sliders allowed the rope to travel through them both ways. It was only when the top of the sliders were torqued by some weight, then they held fast. (This seems be okay, since your body weight attaches to the top of the sliders.)

I can't wait to try it.

shhhh, the secret technique for removing mildew small... soak them in a solution of laundry detergent (e.g. Wisk) for a few weeks. Use an old cooler, fill it with water and some detergent, put it somewhere out of the way and let everything soak.
 

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Bene505 - Let me know if you find any good riggers. Where are you in New England? Im on the Sound out of Mt. Sinai. I am thinking about having mine inspected as well and am so torn between everything I read. This is only my second year with my Morgan 323 but it was made in 1983 and has the original rigging. I inspect it very closely and it looks amazingly in good condition for its age. The two prior owners took very good care of the boat and used it very little so the rig was never stressed too much which is probably why it looks so good - BUT when the rigging is as old as I am (25) it kind of scares me since I do like to go out and push myself and the boat in all sorts of weather.
 

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BUT when the rigging is as old as I am (25) it kind of scares me since I do like to go out and push myself and the boat in all sorts of weather.
Skip the inspection and replace your rigging. Remove, inspect and possibly replace your chainplates too.

Sorry, I know you didn't ask but I just can't help myself.:eek:
 

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nk-
The modern trend is to say replace it all after 20 years at the outside. The swages, especially aloft, may have taken freeze damage and loosened even if they show no cracks. To check for cracks, you'd also have to use a dye kit on every swage and fitting--aloft as well as on deck. By the time you are done with all the scrambling around...the cost of new rigging may be the least of the investment. Too many folks have just found that even the best of stainless just lets go from crevice failure after 20+ years. 26 years, time enough.

The cheap way to test wire rigging is to haul a cheap terry towel up and down each wire. If you get one meathook--just one meathook--tearing off just one strand of the towel at any point? You condemn all the rigging, because that one failure means the wires are all suspect.

And of course at that point, if your mast isn't down for the winter...might as well pull the stick and attend to anything else that needs to be done at the same time. Masthead bulbs, new antenna & coax...R&R time.
Maybe we've all gotten too conservative, 30 years ago folks thought stainless lasted forever. Go figure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Thanks Hellosailor. Good post. (Have to go get some terry cloth.)
 

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Well

It was easy for me because Hall Spars copied my riging for less than 700 dollars so at 28 years it was a silly risk to take

I machine,weld and work with SS everyday and other than some minor rust spots the fittings LOOKED fine, the mast is down every year so i see it up close

I look at as the cost of the wire Vs the cost of hurting crew a mast sails ect
 

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I am planning on replacing all the standing rigging at the end of this years season. At the point the boat will be hauled, mast down and I figured I would have a rigger do up all the stays and shrouds and I will just put them back on myself.

The other option I was thinking about but have never found a place like this - is is there a place somewhere on Long Island sound where I could leave my boat in the water during the season and have a rigger replace everything with the mast up and the boat in the water? That would probably be the only way I could get to doing it before the end of this season.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 · (Edited)
nk235 lost his forestay soon after that last post. The post is called: lost rigging while sailing.

It wouldn't let me post the link because INSIDE THE LINK ADDRESS, it parsed the word rigging <-- like it just did there.

2 days ago I was responding to some posts on here about rigging and when to replace and even though mine is original it looks to be in excellent condition, etc., etc.....Well today I was moving my boat from its winter berth to be hauled out for a bottom job at a marina a few miles away. Raised the main, had a nice breeze, gorgeous day. Then as I was unfurling the jib I felt something weird and then as the sail was out noticed the backstay was very slack...turned out the furler which on my older hyde unit is the one and only headstay, parted from the mast! The halyard was the only thing holding everything up. Luckily we dropped all sail and continued under power to the marina where I had the boat hauled and a rigger take a look at everyting. Now I am going to have a new headstay and furler put on and am most likely going to replace everything.

Just thought it was ironic how not only 2 days ago I was asking about replacing my rigging...received my answer in a different way!
 

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Expertise: Priceless

That's a sobering post. I went through some of this same thought process when I got my boat - 25 year old boat, original standing rigging. I ended up paying a pro to survey, and went ahead and replaced headstay, backstay, uppers, lowers, pretty much everything. My notes say 'survey $150' and I recall that I spent about $2000, but my notes say '$6500 - another yikes'. But that included a hydraulic backstay adjuster, three new halyards, a spinnaker crane, spinlocks, and a halyard retainer for the furling.

That was four years ago. And I'm damn glad I did it all. No regrets.

The expertise I got from the rigger was invaluable. He could tell at a glance what sizes wires and pins were and knew what they were supposed to be, he figured out where to order replacement left threaded metric pins to fit my turnbuckles... in fact everything he suggested was well worth doing.

One of the things he said was 'are you planning on replacing your traveler?'. I answered honestly that I had not been planning to do that. The traveler busted that summer. I talked to the rigger later, and he said 'well, I told you so'. So listen carefully and ask questions. Apparently asking if I was planning on replacing something was this riggers way of saying that the piece of equipment was trashed.

BTW - I also have an ATN top climber on the way. There's stuff that needs doing up there.
 

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Please be careful...

Do not, under any circumstances, attempt to go aloft while the boat is on the hard.

I'm a rigger in Western Long Island Sound (my boat is at Glen Cove Marina) and will help you if I can.

Mike Robinson
RiggersWorld division of
Home

I bought our Beneteau 50 last July and the rig has never been inspected. I just bought an ATN Top Climber, so I can go up the stick at will. Do I need to have a professional inspect the rig, or is it something - with some research - that I can do myself?
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Do not, under any circumstances, attempt to go aloft while the boat is on the hard.

I'm a rigger in Western Long Island Sound (my boat is at Glen Cove Marina) and will help you if I can.

Mike Robinson
RiggersWorld division of
Home
Thanks Mike. I appreciate the reminder on the dangers of going up when the boat is on the hard.

I've taked with Steve (don't remember his last name right now) who does contract work at Brewers, and came recommended by my neighbors in the yard. He also let me watch him service winches (that's winches with and "i") and gave me some insights into doing that. I haven't given the official go-ahead because Mark at Brewers is so good that he'll see it gets done promptly, and I don't want to pay for the crane. Better to wait until she's in the water.

That all said, if things don't work out, I'll keep you in mind. Your right nearby and it's good to support a fellow Sailnetter.

Regards
 

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Please be careful...

Do not, under any circumstances, attempt to go aloft while the boat is on the hard.

I'm a rigger in Western Long Island Sound (my boat is at Glen Cove Marina) and will help you if I can.

Mike Robinson
RiggersWorld division of
Home

I bought our Beneteau 50 last July and the rig has never been inspected. I just bought an ATN Top Climber, so I can go up the stick at will. Do I need to have a professional inspect the rig, or is it something - with some research - that I can do myself?
 

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nk235 lost his forestay soon after that last post. The post is called: lost rigging while sailing.

It wouldn't let me post the link because INSIDE THE LINK ADDRESS, it parsed the word rigging <-- like it just did there.
Ironic huh? I'm just glad it happened while I was bringing the boat over to get hauled and have a rigger take a look anyway. I decided to replace everything as well along with the new forstay and furler. Let me know how yours turns out and I'll do the same with mine.
 

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Ironic huh?
Ironic? No. Not ironic. :(

May I remind you of my response to you when you posted:

BUT when the rigging is as old as I am (25) it kind of scares me since I do like to go out and push myself and the boat in all sorts of weather.
Here's what I said:

knothead said:
Skip the inspection and replace your rigging. Remove, inspect and possibly replace your chainplates too.
I can't say it enough.

Stuff breaks because it gets old. It breaks in places that you can't see.

If you had posted five years ago that your rigging was twenty years old, I would have said the same thing.

REPLACE IT!
 

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I guess "lucky" is the term since it happened when I was bringing the boat to get hauled anyway and should not have used "ironic" I just thought it was ironic because I wanted to replace the rigging since last year when I first bought the boat but didn't have the money and if you really think of how many people out there are sailing on boats just as old as mine if not older with the original rigging. Ironic was used because the rigging actually failed 2 days after I decided to post something about it -
 
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