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Discussion Starter #1
We recently purchased a 1972 Columbia 45 sloop from the estate of the original owner. His son had recently replaced the mast, spreaders and standing rigging but had not reconnected the mast wiring.
Included in the sale was was a fair condition 100% jib and boom from what appeared to be a self tending jib with two spring held blocks mounted to the foredeck just forward of the mast. Neither the sail nor the boom were were mounted and in their place there is a newer good condition 130% jib. There is no roller furling and the new forestay has no fitting for the club foot boom. The boom itself has a sail slot on it's top but there are no fiittings or blocks or tang on the aft end which you would expect for line control or sheeting.

Hopefully amongst the membership someone has either the experience or savoir faire to assist us in evaluating whether the reconditioning of the self tending system is worthwhile, and how to do it. I would expect the need for a mainsheet type of block system with a locking cam thru a double block at the boom end.
Also a gooseneck type clamp at the forward end of the jib boom around the forestay.
All suggestions and diagrams welcome.
 

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If it was me, the best way to rig the boom would be to put it in a dumpster. Unless it's a Hoyt boom it will mean a ballooning sail on all except hard on the wind and anti-self tending rigging to get the sail to set properly on all other points of sale. lt will clutter up the foredeck and constantly be in the way. If not properly corralled, will be a blunt force weapon on the foredeck and have the scar to prove it. Unless you sail in a consistent high wind area like SF Bay, the boat will be very undercanvassed and a poor sailor in most conditions you'd want to be out sailing with that small jib.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the prompt response.
I agree that it seems superflous to have a boom clutter and obstruct the foredeck. What to do with an 18' boom that weighs much more than a spinnaker pole? The old jib can be (with some of the hanks repaired) used as a back up loose footed. We'll mount the dinghy on the foredeck instead.

Appreciated the advice.
 

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Our staysail is self tending w/o a boom. Works well enough but if we want to flatten it we have a sheet w/a snap shackle to pull it inboard to the rail or a turnbuckle. Unfortunately the sail was cut a bit too hogh. Would have been much better had the clew been cut a foot or so lower.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Our staysail is self tending w/o a boom. Works well enough but if we want to flatten it we have a sheet w/a snap shackle to pull it inboard to the rail or a turnbuckle. Unfortunately the sail was cut a bit too hogh. Would have been much better had the clew been cut a foot or so lower.
Thanks for the advice. I think we’ll keep the 100% jib ( it’s about 9oz.) as a spare. We don’t have a staysail rigged and would rather keep the foredeck clear for handling the 130 and going forward to the ground tackle locker. I’ll put the word out with the coconut Telegraph with the Dockmaster to see if anyone wants an 18 ft boom to reconfigure their rig.
 

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Capta's self-tending setup can work well and gets rid of the problems caused by the jib-boom. (It's also called a club boom for a reason - and that's not using the "Yacht Club" sense of the word.) Since there's no boom to hold the foot of the sail taught you would need some sort of traveler or horse for the sheet to ride on so that it will slide from side to side when you change tacks. At one point we used a 2" stainless steel pipe that was bent in a gentle curve (bowed aft) and bolted about 2" off the deck. The jib sheet ran to a block on a ring that slid back & forth on the pipe and was adjusted in/out with a short control line. The jib sheet went from the block on the ring forward to a block near the forestay, and then aft to the cockpit. You might also be able to use a loop of line to achieve the same function instead. After saving up for a few years we replaced the pipe with a real traveler track that had a ball-bearing car. Both systems worked fine, though the pipe got some raised eyebrows on the racing scene, especially when we beat people. (On the race course, not with the pipe ;))
 
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