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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I don't know what they are*, but 25% have failed. Give me a solid hand-turned eyesplice and lanyard any day. :)

Another case of "Why isn't this stuff tested better?" --
doesn't anyone have a rigger on their boat any more?

Clipper Race: current race halted and diverted to Hong Kong

*Also know as stretching screws and turnbuckles -- I was going for a joke there -- see the :)?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
They may have riggers, but how would he attach the end of a rod to a tang without the 20 ton press?
That's my point -- if you can't fix it or bypass it while in the middle of the ocean, it probably doesn't belong on the boat.

No details on the exact kind of failure, so we'll have to wait and see if it's bad design, bad materials, bad manufacturing or improper use.

"One thing we would like to add is, once you have made two or three practice splices, splicing wire is not much more difficult than knitting. To make a splice in 5/16" diameter 7X7 wire takes about 30 to 35 minutes once you have some practice. The cost savings are amazing, the longevity and dependability, as discussed in our Storm Tactics DVD make spliced ends definitely the gold standard for offshore cruising boats."

-- Lin and Larry Pardey
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
You will find rod rigging on lots of performance/racing boats, think they have a somewhat shorter expected service life than wire.
But unreliable if done properly - don't think so.
Not so much unreliable as unpredictable. Unless you inspect it with a gazillion-dollar X-ray machine, you cannot see fatigue & failure building in it. It's like the Apha-Echo-3-5 unit in "2001: A Space Odyssey" -- it is 100% operational until it fails -- then, you're in a world of hurt.

Maybe they should think about using something like Dyneema -- at least you can see it fraying, and repairs should not require 20-ton machines, just a marlingspike & a few special fids.
 
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