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Tundra Down
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Discussion Starter #1
After all the effort and care to keep the hull clean, the Atomic 4 running properly and the correct prop spinning at its optimum rpm. a small clump of Ascophyllum around the shaft ahead of the prop will immediately take 300+ rpm and is difficult to dislodge. Running against a tide and a wind it is next to impossible to back down and attempt to clear it. Sometimes, nothing short of reaching down with a boat hook will clear it away. After a good storm, rafts of this wonderful weed become a bigger performance problem than any of the mechanical or design issues I face.

I do not have a shaft mounted line cutter. Wondering and hoping that might be a simple solution. Anyone had a problem with rockweed? Any suggestions?

Thanks,

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Yep, happens all the time in the Chesapeake's upper reaches. I put that A4 in reverse, rev the engine a second or two, and I'm on my way.

Gary
 

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You think you've got problems, try dodging kelp paddies all day. The stuff gets 40+ feet long.
 

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Tundra Down
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Discussion Starter #4
Yep, happens all the time in the Chesapeake's upper reaches. I put that A4 in reverse, rev the engine a second or two, and I'm on my way.

Gary
Thanks for the reply, Gary. That does work for me when it is possible to do it. There are enough times when it isn't possible. There are times when avoiding or even seeing it is more difficult than avoiding lobster pots. It can be a "continuous" problem at times.

Riding along in a channel with a strong tide running, the wind on the nose and a sea of lobster pots, I need the extra rpms. I can slog along if clearing the rockweed hasn't been successful. I would like to engineer that little PITA away. I am wondering if anyone has installed a line cutter and seen this old sea weed problem vanish as a result.

I avoid lobster pots fairly well. With my fin and spade they get my respect. I have several friends who are lobster fishermen. Having a knife that might result in cutting off their gear because I hadn't been careful about avoiding it has been a hurdle for me. I have never cut a lobster pot float away. I expect I won't with a line cutter either. I want the rockweed to go away.

George
 

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In Chesapeake Bay we have crab pots, more than a half million of them every summer. This year, however, they have not been a problem, mainly because the commercial crabbers have once again wiped out the crabs, and from the latest information, they've also wiped out the striped bass as well - they've had a lot of practice at this over the years.

Fortunately, I have a full-keel on my Morgan 33 Out Island, and a keel mounted rudder. Consequently, it's nearly impossible to snag a crab pot buoy line, which is the way I like it. Now, when I had a fin keeled 27 Catalina, I snagged one nearly every day. Also snagged a lot more vegetation as well. That full keel is a lifesaver as far as I'm concerned. Sure is a SOB to back up, though.

Gary :cool:
 

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Invest in a set of Spurs and forget about the problem!

Gary
The bass fishing has been terrible the last few years up here. 10 years ago I would catch 20 fish a night, I catch and release. This year I caught 0 all year!
I suspected the commercial harvest in the Hudson and Chessy.
Jim
 

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Last time I was up your way, it was mentioned that many of the lobster fishermen were using steel cable on their trap lines. If this is true, even cutters won't help, and if the pots are in a navigable channel, I would think the fishermen would be liable for damage to your vessel. One trip from Newport to Providence, though I remained within the buoyed shipping channel, there was no clear path up the bay. I understand these guys want to make a living, but they should leave others some channel through the waters they wish to fish in.
As for the weed, I'd never heard of it before your post, so I've no thoughts there.
 

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Invest in a set of Spurs and forget about the problem!

Gary
The bass fishing has been terrible the last few years up here. 10 years ago I would catch 20 fish a night, I catch and release. This year I caught 0 all year!
I suspected the commercial harvest in the Hudson and Chessy.
Jim
This year's school of new stripers on the Upper Chesapeake .... very very few to almost NONE! .... of the few being caught almost all are extremely small and underweight, VERY FEW 'keepers'. At least the few 'keepers' arent wormy.

I havent seen striper (called 'rockfish' in Mer'lin) fishing this bad since the late 1980s and then again back to the 60s when the Russian trawlers were sucking up every possible life form in the 'surf' along the NJ/DE/MD and VA coasts.

The turbidity on the Upper Bay for the past few years .... looks like diarrhea water that you can almost walk on. WE did have a severe duckweed problem this summer on the upper eastern shore; better than the usual highly toxic cyano-bacteria/algae blooms, I guess.
 

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Very disappointing
All the time and work that went into the most successful recovery program for fish wasted.
Jim
 

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There really wasn't a lot of work that went into the recovery - they just passed a law that said you can't kill them for a couple years. Works every time. If you don't kill them, they can reproduce. Amazing how that works.

As for the Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Program - it's a joke, it has always been a farce, and nothing less. The bay will never be cleaner than it is right now. It don't take more money, it just needs a common sense approach, but because politics and big business in involved, it will never happen - ever.

Gary
 

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The problem is that the Conowingo Dam on the Susq. is no longer holding back the mega-amount of silt being contained since the 1920s, the ever famous Baltimore Back Creek Sewage treatment plant continues to routinely dump mega-amounts of S#i† into the bay (the benefits of 'sovereign immunity' for environmental crimes), the phosphate, etc. load in the farm fields (from the bay all the way to central NY state and the Shenandoah Valley) is no longer staying attached in the soils .... too many damn people not enough recipes.

Get used to it, the Ches. is simply now a sewer and all the remedies continue to remain expensive 'more studies, more grant money, empty talk and inaction'.
 

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Many years ago, when I made my living as a freelance, outdoor writer, I wrote an article in the Washington Post about the Chesapeake Bay Cleanup program, one that was less than flattering. CBF (Chesapeake Bay Foundation) top guns tried to get me fired for it, but my editor back then pretty much told them we don't fire people for telling it like it is.

One of the things that article pointed out was the number of wastewater treatment plants along the Susquehanna and Potomac rivers. At the time, there were about 130 plants on the Susquehanna alone, and every town along the river that dumped in their treated waste, also withdrew water for their municipal water systems. By the time the river reached Harrisburg, PA, the entire river's water volume had been recirculated, thus the good folks in Harrisburg were drinking treated sewage water. Downriver from Harrisburg, after passing through four more dams, the river's water was withdrawn by the towns of Port Deposit and Havre de Grace, Maryland. At the end of the article I stated "If the good folks of Harrisburg, PA didn't flush their toilets, Port Deposit and Havre de Grace would not have any drinking water. Now that really pissed off CBF - but it's still the case today. Think about it.

When I was a kid, which was the same time John Paul Jones joined the Navy, there were red signs all along Gwynns Falls in Baltimore City near Leakin Park. Those signs said "Danger - Polluted Water - Typhoid Fever - KEEP OUT!" That was in the 1940s. At the time, there was no sewage disposal plant connection at Walbrook Junction in West Baltimore. The sewage discharged direction into the stream just above the Hilton Street Bridge. Ironically, back then, the stream's waters were almost crystal clear, there was a huge smallmouth bass population just below Dickeyville Dam and downstream to Hilton Street Bridge. You could catch smallmouths on just about every case with a live minnow for bait. Now, that same stream, is a slow moving sewer and the underwater visibility is nearly zero.

Keep in mind that everytime there's a new baby born in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, that baby poops into the bay and continues to do so for an average of 85 years. And, that baby will likely produce several more babies that will all do the same thing. Kinda makes me wonder what idiot came up with the idea that we should poop and pee in the very same water we intend to drink and obtain our food from? Surely, there is a better way of processing human and animal waste.

One more point, one that's very important to consider. Our coastal waters are just as polluted as Chesapeake Bay. When I was very young, the water at Ocean City, Maryland's beaches was clear enough to provide 15 to 20-foot underwater visibility while snorkeling. Today, you would be hard pressed to see your feet while standing knee deep in the same water. When you look at satellite imagery of the Mid-Atlantic coastal region, you can clearly see where all that filthy water from Chesapeake and Delaware bays is flowing to. Something to consider the next time you take the kids to the ocean for a fun day in the surf.

Gary :cool:
 

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Frisco Bay was just as bad in the 60's but with more chemical waste from the farms and industry up the rivers. All the state would do was blame the yachts and let the major polluters continue pouring everything including DDT into the rivers, because that was politically and economically expedient.
Money trumps the environment, even today, with big business's ability to just buy their way out of damaging the environment.
 

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S/V Wyndwitch - Morgan 24
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Great South Bay ( Long Island, New York) has the same issues but I would also note that massive phosphate and pesticide/herbicide loads derive from suburban lawns...it is not politically healthy to say so but simply stopping lawn treatments and returning to other types of yard treatments would be a huge improvement here.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I317 using Tapatalk
 

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Tundra Down
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Discussion Starter #15
Last time I was up your way, it was mentioned that many of the lobster fishermen were using steel cable on their trap lines. If this is true, even cutters won't help, and if the pots are in a navigable channel, I would think the fishermen would be liable for damage to your vessel. One trip from Newport to Providence, though I remained within the buoyed shipping channel, there was no clear path up the bay. I understand these guys want to make a living, but they should leave others some channel through the waters they wish to fish in.
As for the weed, I'd never heard of it before your post, so I've no thoughts there.
Yup! It is a concern here. Lobster trap placement varies from town to town. Some towns do try to regulate their placement and keep busy channels clear. I have never heard of wire being used on floats. The law prevents floating line. I guess I will install a cutter and see if my occasional stops to clear rockweed go away. I am due to replace my cutlass bearing soon and may as well take care of all shaft related upgrades.

The lobster fishermen set traps in all the harbors and anchorages, too. At my mooring in Seal Harbor my rudder occasionally gets fouled by a lobster trap float just sitting on the ball.

Thanks,

George
 
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