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Tundra Down
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After all the effort and care to keep the hull clean, the Atomic 4 running properly and the correct prop spinning at its optimum rpm. a small clump of Ascophyllum around the shaft ahead of the prop will immediately take 300+ rpm and is difficult to dislodge. Running against a tide and a wind it is next to impossible to back down and attempt to clear it. Sometimes, nothing short of reaching down with a boat hook will clear it away. After a good storm, rafts of this wonderful weed become a bigger performance problem than any of the mechanical or design issues I face.

I do not have a shaft mounted line cutter. Wondering and hoping that might be a simple solution. Anyone had a problem with rockweed? Any suggestions?

Thanks,

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Tundra Down
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yep, happens all the time in the Chesapeake's upper reaches. I put that A4 in reverse, rev the engine a second or two, and I'm on my way.

Gary
Thanks for the reply, Gary. That does work for me when it is possible to do it. There are enough times when it isn't possible. There are times when avoiding or even seeing it is more difficult than avoiding lobster pots. It can be a "continuous" problem at times.

Riding along in a channel with a strong tide running, the wind on the nose and a sea of lobster pots, I need the extra rpms. I can slog along if clearing the rockweed hasn't been successful. I would like to engineer that little PITA away. I am wondering if anyone has installed a line cutter and seen this old sea weed problem vanish as a result.

I avoid lobster pots fairly well. With my fin and spade they get my respect. I have several friends who are lobster fishermen. Having a knife that might result in cutting off their gear because I hadn't been careful about avoiding it has been a hurdle for me. I have never cut a lobster pot float away. I expect I won't with a line cutter either. I want the rockweed to go away.

George
 

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Tundra Down
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Last time I was up your way, it was mentioned that many of the lobster fishermen were using steel cable on their trap lines. If this is true, even cutters won't help, and if the pots are in a navigable channel, I would think the fishermen would be liable for damage to your vessel. One trip from Newport to Providence, though I remained within the buoyed shipping channel, there was no clear path up the bay. I understand these guys want to make a living, but they should leave others some channel through the waters they wish to fish in.
As for the weed, I'd never heard of it before your post, so I've no thoughts there.
Yup! It is a concern here. Lobster trap placement varies from town to town. Some towns do try to regulate their placement and keep busy channels clear. I have never heard of wire being used on floats. The law prevents floating line. I guess I will install a cutter and see if my occasional stops to clear rockweed go away. I am due to replace my cutlass bearing soon and may as well take care of all shaft related upgrades.

The lobster fishermen set traps in all the harbors and anchorages, too. At my mooring in Seal Harbor my rudder occasionally gets fouled by a lobster trap float just sitting on the ball.

Thanks,

George
 
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