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In Chesapeake Bay we have crab pots, more than a half million of them every summer. This year, however, they have not been a problem, mainly because the commercial crabbers have once again wiped out the crabs, and from the latest information, they've also wiped out the striped bass as well - they've had a lot of practice at this over the years.

Fortunately, I have a full-keel on my Morgan 33 Out Island, and a keel mounted rudder. Consequently, it's nearly impossible to snag a crab pot buoy line, which is the way I like it. Now, when I had a fin keeled 27 Catalina, I snagged one nearly every day. Also snagged a lot more vegetation as well. That full keel is a lifesaver as far as I'm concerned. Sure is a SOB to back up, though.

Gary :cool:
 

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There really wasn't a lot of work that went into the recovery - they just passed a law that said you can't kill them for a couple years. Works every time. If you don't kill them, they can reproduce. Amazing how that works.

As for the Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Program - it's a joke, it has always been a farce, and nothing less. The bay will never be cleaner than it is right now. It don't take more money, it just needs a common sense approach, but because politics and big business in involved, it will never happen - ever.

Gary
 

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Many years ago, when I made my living as a freelance, outdoor writer, I wrote an article in the Washington Post about the Chesapeake Bay Cleanup program, one that was less than flattering. CBF (Chesapeake Bay Foundation) top guns tried to get me fired for it, but my editor back then pretty much told them we don't fire people for telling it like it is.

One of the things that article pointed out was the number of wastewater treatment plants along the Susquehanna and Potomac rivers. At the time, there were about 130 plants on the Susquehanna alone, and every town along the river that dumped in their treated waste, also withdrew water for their municipal water systems. By the time the river reached Harrisburg, PA, the entire river's water volume had been recirculated, thus the good folks in Harrisburg were drinking treated sewage water. Downriver from Harrisburg, after passing through four more dams, the river's water was withdrawn by the towns of Port Deposit and Havre de Grace, Maryland. At the end of the article I stated "If the good folks of Harrisburg, PA didn't flush their toilets, Port Deposit and Havre de Grace would not have any drinking water. Now that really pissed off CBF - but it's still the case today. Think about it.

When I was a kid, which was the same time John Paul Jones joined the Navy, there were red signs all along Gwynns Falls in Baltimore City near Leakin Park. Those signs said "Danger - Polluted Water - Typhoid Fever - KEEP OUT!" That was in the 1940s. At the time, there was no sewage disposal plant connection at Walbrook Junction in West Baltimore. The sewage discharged direction into the stream just above the Hilton Street Bridge. Ironically, back then, the stream's waters were almost crystal clear, there was a huge smallmouth bass population just below Dickeyville Dam and downstream to Hilton Street Bridge. You could catch smallmouths on just about every case with a live minnow for bait. Now, that same stream, is a slow moving sewer and the underwater visibility is nearly zero.

Keep in mind that everytime there's a new baby born in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, that baby poops into the bay and continues to do so for an average of 85 years. And, that baby will likely produce several more babies that will all do the same thing. Kinda makes me wonder what idiot came up with the idea that we should poop and pee in the very same water we intend to drink and obtain our food from? Surely, there is a better way of processing human and animal waste.

One more point, one that's very important to consider. Our coastal waters are just as polluted as Chesapeake Bay. When I was very young, the water at Ocean City, Maryland's beaches was clear enough to provide 15 to 20-foot underwater visibility while snorkeling. Today, you would be hard pressed to see your feet while standing knee deep in the same water. When you look at satellite imagery of the Mid-Atlantic coastal region, you can clearly see where all that filthy water from Chesapeake and Delaware bays is flowing to. Something to consider the next time you take the kids to the ocean for a fun day in the surf.

Gary :cool:
 
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