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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm getting frustrated with my paint project. The deck area looks great but the hull.. The paint isn't leveling out properly. I've added the recommend portion of thinner to the paint. I'm rolling vertically, tipping horizontally. Weather wise, it's in the mid 70's today.

For a hull should you roll horizontally & tip vertically so gravity does it's thing. Also any thoughts on keeping the brush in thinner instead of paint to help the process along. I'm using Pettit Ezpoxy 2. The stuff so easy even an idiot can paint a boat :laugher

Bob
 

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Maybe send a PM to tommays.. his turned out amazing.
 

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Noah's Bosun
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Just got done doing a couple of dink hulls in Pettit easy poxy. (Photo date is incorrect, pic taken last Thur)



Technique I use to roll and tip. (Real men don't read the instructions on the can) Have not used EZpoxy II but technique should be the same. (Disclaimer) Works for me, your mileage may vary.

Unless coating is very heavy bodied, do not thin. Think "warm pancake syrup"...

Apply with a good 1/4" nap roller. Lambs wool is best, but expensive and you probably won't be able to clean it well enough to use on another job. Saturate the roller with paint and store in double plastic bags between coats. Roll out excess on scrap board before rolling next coat. Foam rollers (in my experience) won't carry enough paint for a decent job.

Do not over roll. You need enough paint to do a decent tip, but not so much it sags on a vertical hull surface. Practice makes perfect. If you get sagging, brush it out, and plan on another coat to fix.

Roll out an area about 3'x3', ending up just overlapping your last area tipped. I start out with a "W" shape, then roll in both directions to evenly coat the area. Last pass VERY light handed to avoid "pecker tracks". You can make as many passes as you need to, but don't spread the paint out too thin.

Tipping brush should be as good a quality as you can afford. No $3.00 throw aways. Make sure bristles are soft and clean. (use a brass "grill brush" to help clean and comb when you are cleaning your brushes for re-use) For large areas I use a 5-1/2" brush.

Tipping brush should be essentially dry... Do not dip in the paint can. Keep the tips clean by rinsing in some clean "fast flash" thinner between tips. Acetone or lacquer thinner works well. Slap dry on some scrap before your next tip.

Work from the dry edge (edge where the just rolled area stops) back to your "wet edge" where you overlapped the previously tipped area. Hold your brush at a 90 degree angle to the hull and starting at the top, make as many overlapping passes as required to reach the bottom of the area you just rolled. DO NOT "Mop" THE PAINT The point is to just break the surface tension of the paint film, not to move it around. Your rolled surface should already be an even distribution of paint. Think of tickling someone with a feather.... Your tip brush should have no almost no paint showing on it after you are done tipping.

Repeat as required.

It does take some practice, best to get out some scrap ply and have a go at that until you are confident in your technique. Biggest mistakes I see, are not enough paint thickness on roll out, and too much pressure when tipping. Remember, 90 degrees to the surface (just the tip of the bristles, never the shafts) and tickle, not mop.

Not difficult, and once you get the feel, it will produce a good job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I watched a bunch of videos on the subject last evening. Some say tip with a dry brush, some say wet with paint, some say thinner....

I've come to the conclusion I'm laying down too large an area. I'm using a 9" roller on a stick so I'm only climbing a ladder to "tip". When the roller get's loaded with paint, I'm covering too large an area. With the stick I'm not painting within an "arms" length.

I'll bag the stick, switch over to a 4" roller & see what happens next weekend.
 

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Noah's Bosun
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I use a 9" roller, I might have underestimated the area I roll, it could be up to 4x4...
Saturate the roller, then loose about 1/2 rolling out in the tray. You dont have to run the roller dry on the hull... what you want is an even (repeatable) film thickness. Same load each time. How much will depend on your surface and paint. Why I test a few times on some scrap before starting the hull.

One pass with the tip brush overlapping strokes about 1/4 inch or so. Again, point is to break the surface tension of the rolled surface, not to move the paint.

Good luck, let us know how it works out for you. Getting ready to R&T my hull and topsides in a couple of weeks with Interthane 990 (2 part polyurethane)
.
 

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Bombay Explorer 44
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OK Here is how I have done it using International Perfection2 pack polyurethane.

You must use their brushing reducer.

Set up a sheet of glass so as to be vertical and have some rags and cleaning thinner to hand so as to be able to clean the glass after each test .

Do a test roll and tip on the glass.

Increase the amount of reducer until the brush strokes disappear but there is no sagging.

I have used both top quality bristle brushes and cheap foam, both gave good results.

I found that I could not get a good result if I did both the rolling and the tipping on a large area say a boat's topsides. You really need two people.

Apply three coats wet sanding with 360/400 between coats. Some people say that by the time you have finished your third coat that is as good as you are going to get.

N.B. Getting a good result is MUCH easier with white or any light color than dark blue or green.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So today I put the second coat on the deck/cabin sides. I kept the tipping brush in thinner & shook it out before tipping. What an incredible difference in the finish. I put the first coat on the cockpit/anchor locker covers & a couple of hatches. They look so good I don't want to top coat them.

After reflection, I was rolling out to large an area before tipping the hull. I'll tighten that up quite a bit. I'm working alone so to lay down 12-16 sq ft of paint & then go back to tip, it's too much. Looking at the hull this morning, the transom & starboard quarter look great because they were smaller areas. Once I started moving down the hull the roller has a mind of it's own.

Faster, Tommays did confirm he tipped down instead of horizontal on the hull & his paint job confirms that!

Thanks everyone,
Bob
 

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Mike M. s/v Pharon P30
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What do you do about the tight spots say between the cockpit bench & bulkhead? On my Pearson 30 there's a inch wide drain area. Would I just squish a brush into it and let the paint find it's own level?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
What do you do about the tight spots say between the cockpit bench & bulkhead? On my Pearson 30 there's a inch wide drain area. Would I just squish a brush into it and let the paint find it's own level?
I guess it's kind of like an inside corner where anything in the cockpit meets. You roll up to, then paint it & hopefully it's not on too thick so it runs but just levels out.
 

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Mike M. s/v Pharon P30
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ok, thanks for the reply's.
 
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