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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Guys,

This piece is a flange/support pad from a Ranger 29. I need to ID the type of material so I can source it to make a new pad. I program and operate CNC routers and I familiar with many materials and composites but this one I have seen but do not know what it is. Anyone have the name for it?

Thanks,

Gary
<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/10954446056/" title="IMG_0029 by gedaggett, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7399/10954446056_4ab44395d6.jpg" width="500" height="375" alt="IMG_0029"></a>

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/10954367005/" title="IMG_0030 by gedaggett, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5496/10954367005_40d0860ec7.jpg" width="500" height="375" alt="IMG_0030"></a>

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/10954613963/" title="IMG_0026 by gedaggett, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7420/10954613963_b5122b70c1.jpg" width="500" height="375" alt="IMG_0026"></a>
 

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Linen filled Phenolic?? Used to be a lot of blocks and cleats made of it too.. Is that under the rudder head? No reason to use something like Starboard or Nylon instead? Might weather better.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Linen filled Phenolic?? Used to be a lot of blocks and cleats made of it too.. Is that under the rudder head? No reason to use something like Starboard or Nylon instead? Might weather better.
Good call Faster. Looks like I have Phenol formaldehyde resin. I thought maybe it was phenolic but the fiber was throwing me off.


This is the flange under the tiller head and I would use something else but it takes the entire weight of the rudder so it has to have excellent hardness and no compression. I will try and source this but it will likely be tough. Anyone have some they would like to part with?


 

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A little history!

phenol formaldehyde resin polyoxybenzylmethylenglycolanhydride, developed in 1907–1909 by Dr. Leo Baekeland. Formed by the reaction under heat and pressure of phenol and formaldehyde, generally with a wood flour filler, it was the first plastic made from synthetic components. It was used for its nonconductive and heat-resistant properties in radio and telephone casings and electrical insulators, and was also used in diverse products such as kitchenware, jewelry, pipe stems, and toys. In 1993 Bakelite was designated a ACS National Historical Chemical Landmark in recognition of its significance as the world's first completely synthetic plastic.
 

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Not really Bakelite, though, is it?. (what you've got there).. I remember old phones that were bakelite But I thought it was usually a heavier, more homogenous black material?
 

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Not really Bakelite, though, is it?. (what you've got there).. I remember old phones that were bakelite But I thought it was usually a heavier, more homogenous black material?
You are correct. Bakelite is made with the same type of resin though. Adding the different reinforcing materials and processing with different ethyl based chemicals produces the different varieties of material (if I understand it correctly).
 

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It was very common as block cheeks and other deck hardware on UK built boats or boats that had UK deck hardware in the past - like my CS27. Its use was very common - look at any UK built Westerly, Hurley, etc. I have upgraded my gear but it did last 35 years with no real visible wear. Seems UV wasn't much of an issue either.

Bakelite is a material that is brittle and does not have the reinforcing fibers. It was used for items that did not need much strength like old dial phones.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It was very common as block cheeks and other deck hardware on UK built boats or boats that had UK deck hardware in the past - like my CS27. Its use was very common - look at any UK built Westerly, Hurley, etc. I have upgraded my gear but it did last 35 years with no real visible wear. Seems UV wasn't much of an issue either.

Bakelite is a material that is brittle and does not have the reinforcing fibers. It was used for items that did not need much strength like old dial phones.
Good info.

The technical info for what I am ordering is LE graded Phenolic Laminate. It has a cotton woven structure with the Phenol Formaldehyde Resin and is compressed under very high pressure. Getting pricing now but it does not look like it is cheap at all! I will let you know what I find on the pricing.
 

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McMaster-Carr carries machinable Garolite (LE); 6" x 6" x .5" = $20, about half the price of G-10. Other sources may be cheaper.
Thanks for the source. I have a plastics supplier that is going to get me LE grade Phenolic composite 12x12x.75 for just over $100. Piedmont plastics
 
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