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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So a friend sent me a link to this page 50 Words That Sound Rude But Actually Aren't and at number eighteen we find:
18. FUKSHEET
Fuk was an old Middle English word for a sail, and in particular the foremost sail on a ship. A fukmast, ultimately, is a ship's foremast, while the fuksheet or fuksail is the sail attached to the ship's fukmast.​

I looked a little further and found this The F-Word:
Fuk, fukke, **** and ****e are alternate spellings but had no sexual connotation. Fuksail, fukmast and fuksheet were technical terms used on sailing ships. The words could be used as compounds or separately [fukke mast]. The word was apparently replaced with "fore" [foresail, foremast, foresheet] around 1600. Far from becoming to obscene to print from the early 1500s, this F-word was in common use, at least within the sailing community, until 1600 and probably much later.​

And another reference in the excitingly titled Obsolete Scandinavian Loanwords in English:
The origin of fuk 'some kind of sail; a jib, a stay-sail' is uncertain. However, according to the OED, the most probable source from which fuk might have been borrowed is Old Norse (cf. ON fok 'action of driving').​

Has anyone else heard or read this? And regarding the first entry, wouldn't the fuksheet be the line that controls the fuksail?

(Clearly I have too much spare time on this last day of work before Christmas vacation, I guess I have a case of the fukitalls.)
 

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So a friend sent me a link to this page 50 Words That Sound Rude But Actually Aren't and at number eighteen we find:
18. FUKSHEET
Fuk was an old Middle English word for a sail, and in particular the foremost sail on a ship. A fukmast, ultimately, is a ship's foremast, while the fuksheet or fuksail is the sail attached to the ship's fukmast.​

I looked a little further and found this The F-Word:
Fuk, fukke, **** and ****e are alternate spellings but had no sexual connotation. Fuksail, fukmast and fuksheet were technical terms used on sailing ships. The words could be used as compounds or separately [fukke mast]. The word was apparently replaced with "fore" [foresail, foremast, foresheet] around 1600. Far from becoming to obscene to print from the early 1500s, this F-word was in common use, at least within the sailing community, until 1600 and probably much later.​

And another reference in the excitingly titled Obsolete Scandinavian Loanwords in English:
The origin of fuk 'some kind of sail; a jib, a stay-sail' is uncertain. However, according to the OED, the most probable source from which fuk might have been borrowed is Old Norse (cf. ON fok 'action of driving').​

Has anyone else heard or read this? And regarding the first entry, wouldn't the fuksheet be the line that controls the fuksail?

(Clearly I have too much spare time on this last day of work before Christmas vacation, I guess I have a case of the fukitalls.)
The German name for a jib is Fock and the Dutch is Fok. Clearly the same thing as fuk sail, and absolutely no sexual connotation in either Dutch or German.

And yes, the jib sheet is Fockschoot in German and Fokkenshoot in Dutch.
 

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Fokk is the current Norwegian name for what you call a head sail or jib.
In Swedish and German Fock.

On a full rigged ship the lowest & largest sail on the foremast is called the foresail.
In Norwegian this mast is called fokkemast and the sail is called Fokk.

On a boat with only fore-and-aft sails (sneiseiler in Norwegian) the sail you call a jib is called a fokk.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Language is fun :)

I like fokk, that's great. Hoist the fokk! Drop the fokk! Get the fokk out of here!

And sneiseiler refers to a Bermuda-rigged boat? My wife speaks a bit of Norwegian, I'll have to add fokk and sneiseiler to her vocabulary.
 

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Language is fun :)

I like fokk, that's great. Hoist the fokk! Drop the fokk! Get the fokk out of here!

And sneiseiler refers to a Bermuda-rigged boat? My wife speaks a bit of Norwegian, I'll have to add fokk and sneiseiler to her vocabulary.
You'll never be able to stow such a large fokk down such a small hatch! :eek:

MedSailor
 

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