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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I installed Spartite several years ago and it has worked well. Recently the silicone seal I put around the outside (as instructed) has started to leak. No big deal, I simply resealed it.

What concerns me is what appears to be rust stains coming down the mast below the partners, from where it was leaking. The stains are not visible above deck. The mast and partners are aluminum. Other than Spartite and silicone the only other substance used was the Vaseline Spartite says to lubricate the partners with.
Any thoughts on the stains?
EDIT: Updated 7/15 Post 11.
 

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I understand the upload is not working correctly. Most use Photo bucket for upload and then use the mountain icon on the top of SN post Message edit menu. Sorry can't help you with your rust issue.
 
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Ive got the same brown goo oozing from a couple of places under the deck of my 1969 Columbia 36. Its not rust, I think its color leaching out of the balsa core and/or polyester resin. If you take the whole works apart and seal the edges of the hole with epoxy, you should stop getting three stains. While you've got it apart, check for water intrusion into the deck core.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ive got the same brown goo oozing from a couple of places under the deck of my 1969 Columbia 36. Its not rust, I think its color leaching out of the balsa core and/or polyester resin. If you take the whole works apart and seal the edges of the hole with epoxy, you should stop getting three stains. While you've got it apart, check for water intrusion into the deck core.
Jeeez...I don't know which is worse, rust or color oozing from the core!
The only problem I have with that theory, is that the partners consist of a aluminum collar that lines entire the deck opening. I'll have to examine the partners topside with your theory in mind.
 

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I suspect the answer in all cases is that something is wrong, and you'll need to pull the mast, inspect, and repair. If that's deck, you may find extensive work to be done. And at the same time, might as well have the mast & fittings inspected, do whatever else can be done while it is down. Replace the bulbs in the masthead lights while they're at hand, too.

It sure looks like rust to me, but I've been surprised before.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I suspect the answer in all cases is that something is wrong, and you'll need to pull the mast, inspect, and repair. If that's deck, you may find extensive work to be done. And at the same time, might as well have the mast & fittings inspected, do whatever else can be done while it is down. Replace the bulbs in the masthead lights while they're at hand, too. It sure looks like rust to me, but I've been surprised before.
It's time to pull the stick for several reasons so that's no big deal.
However, I'm thinking about solutions if it does turn out to be rust. Is it even possible that aluminum could rust like that?
I'm wondering if lack of oxygen due to the Spartite could create a condition similar to crevice corrosion in Stainless. I researched Spartite prior to using it and never saw that possibility mentioned.
 

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Never seen alum rust like that. I have done some research on stainless steel and have seen mention to it needing oxygen. I just removed a SS bolt and it was rusting real bad and had no oxygen.

"The basic resistance of stainless steel occurs because of its ability to form a protective coating on the metal surface. This coating is a "passive" film which resists further "oxidation" or rusting. The formation of this film is instantaneous in an oxidizing atmosphere such as air, water, or other fluids that contain oxygen. Once the layer has formed, we say that the metal has become "passivated" and the oxidation or "rusting" rate will slow down to less than 0.002" per year (0,05 mm. per year).

Unlike aluminum or silver this passive film is invisible in stainless steel. It's created when oxygen combines with the chrome in the stainless to form chrome oxide which is more commonly called "ceramic". This protective oxide or ceramic coating is common to most corrosion resistant materials" Quote from: http://www.mcnallyinstitute.com/04-html/4-1.html
 

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Aluminum is incapable of rusting. Rust is slow oxidation of iron, and iron only. Aluminum can and will oxidize, normally forming an extremely thin and hard aluminum oxide coating, which seals it like a glaze and prevents further damage. When or if it does not seal, it forms a white powder instead, and only a very white powder.

So whether you call that rust or not--it won't be the color of iron rust. Not from an aluminum mast.

Maybe there's a steel track? Or steel screws holding a track into the mast? Or some other steelwork hiding in there?
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Looking at the partners topside didn't reveal anything.
For what it's worth, I took this shot of the Cowling opening from below, which is nine inches from the mast. The darker wood on top is a spacer for the cowling.
Core seems dry, though I can dent it with my fingernail. Certainly no stains at the opening.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Finally pulled the stick. Still not sure where the rust colored stains are coming from. Picture of the partners which show some rust colored stains, and the mast. The guy at yard says there is no way the rust is coming from the mast, as aluminum doesn't rust.
Looks like the soggy deck theory might be right.

In the picture showing the partners looking aft (third shot), you can see some cracking in the material that lines the partners (seems like plastic). I wonder if this is where the orange stuff is ozing.? Should I patch the cracks? If so, with what?

Can someone explain the construction of the partners? Certainly nothing soft or spongy there.
 

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