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美国华人, 帆船
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
To open more opportunities, getting endorsement has become an important step to sail on OPB.

RYA wants sea miles but USCG wants days on the boat. It seems that RYA is a way to go at least for my case. But I have to fly to UK or AU to get the practical exam for Yachtmaster Ocean or off-shore. OK, it may be a good excuse to fly to UK for a week. :). ICC comes automatically when you have the RYA Yachtmaster certificate.

Anyone know more about these things?
 

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Corsair 24
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I got my 50ton ticket...but never officially used it...jaja in ft.lauderdale at a well respected school

dont you have to be a uk citizen to get their version...likewise with other countries that offer?
 

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美国华人, 帆船
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If you ever want to carry passengers in the US for hire. A USCG licence is the only one recognized.
Yes, agree.
 

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美国华人, 帆船
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I got my 50ton ticket...but never officially used it...jaja in ft.lauderdale at a well respected school

dont you have to be a uk citizen to get their version...likewise with other countries that offer?
You don't need to be a UK or AU citizen. With ICC around, RYA becomes more acceptable outside the U.S. water.
 

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Corsair 24
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cool I would go for rya then and I agree outside the us the uscg "ticket" is not very well respected or admired...

I think its very useful if you plan to charter and or carry passengers for hire again in us waters...

outside it simply depends on what country you are doing it in

also I got a bunch of ISAF certifications when I was training down here and those I hear are well respected worldwide...

pick your poison then!

good luck
 

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██▓▓▒▒░&
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dawg, you a citizen of the Federal Republic?

OK, then you go for the USCG certification.

You a Brit? Then you look up the RYA.

If life changes and you decide you want to sail in what's left of the Empire, by all means, go for the RYA as well. But first, try out for the home team.
 

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USCG 100 ton is not much - in fact it tends to create suspicion that person has no idea

The Yachtmaster ( if it is the one I am thinking about ) is a serious bit of tea. People who have earned know a lot
 

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I hold a 100 ton license, and have no real familiarity with the RYA Yachtmaster requirements. So is is from general knowledge, not a deep understanding of the testing regime.

The USCG license requires 720 sea days, which typically requires quite a lot of sea time, and requires at least two years to qualify for. The flip side is any time on a boat qualifies, and there is no practical test. So the license itself makes no statement about someone's skill.

The RYA license however only requires 50 hours of sea time, so it's possible but not likely to get in a week. However the RYA license also requires a practical exam, so there is at least some guarantee of skill.

Which do I think of as being more impressive? Meh, I don't think much of either by themselves. Like most commercial companies and insurance companies I put a lot more stock in someone's resume than the license they have. At least when discussing entry level licenses like this.
 

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Thanks for the clarification - the Yachtmaster I was thinking has a few hundred hours of practical requirements plus a minimum of a 2,000 mile blue water passage
 

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美国华人, 帆船
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
dawg, you a citizen of the Federal Republic?

OK, then you go for the USCG certification.

You a Brit? Then you look up the RYA.

If life changes and you decide you want to sail in what's left of the Empire, by all means, go for the RYA as well. But first, try out for the home team.
HS, it is not because I don't want to get my 100 T USGC license. Getting the day counts on a boat is tough for me unless USCG will give me the credits sailing my Catalina 14.2. Just because someone lives on the boat for years, or someone works on a ship in the kitchen, they get more days than me. but I don't think they have more experience than me sailing the boat. I have met many 100T captains, I was not impressed to say the least.

Here is my thinking: I have more than 10,000 off shore miles, and it will qualify me for the RYA yachtmaster certificate. Although I need to pass two written exams and one practical exam on a vessel. Studying and taking exams are never a problem for me. Therefore, until I get my CG license, RYA certificate will provide me a temporary solution if my client wants credential now.

RYA certificate and ICC are accepted outside U.S, especially in China.
 

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美国华人, 帆船
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·

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美国华人, 帆船
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
No, I checked. There are RYA certified yachtmasters in there, but no qualified examiner there except in UK and AU.
 

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Mermaid Hunter
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But I have to fly to UK or AU to get the practical exam for Yachtmaster Ocean or off-shore.
There is a company in Florida ( International Crew Training ) that lets you sit for Yachtmaster. You can even do their prep classes for USCG licenses and Yachtmaster at the same time.
 

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I know plenty of people with USCG six-pack licenses that don't even know how to properly tie a boat to a slip. No doubt people often fake their way to that one. While I've heard of unimpressive 100T masters and recognize their would be a wide spectrum, of all that I know, they are each good seaman. It should not be discredited broadly.
 

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No, I checked. There are RYA certified yachtmasters in there, but no qualified examiner there except in UK and AU.
The sailing school at English Harbour does the course and the examination for Yachtmaster offshore. I signed up for it, but then couldn't take part due to timing issues.

Internationally, the Yachtmaster ticket is pretty much the only one recognized so if you plan on doing work outside of the USA then that is the way to go. Note, too, that the mileage requirements are in tidal waters.
 
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