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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,
I'm on the market to buy a good cruiser that hopefully will suite my needs for the next 10-15 years. I plan to sail that boat for the next 2-3 years on lake ontario, then I would like to take it to the Caribbean for few more years until I can set sails for a circumnavigation, the "milk run" starting by the pacific.
My criteria are:
- 35' to 40'
-Sloop or cutter
-Swimming platform
-Strong and safe enough to have peace of mind for the long passages.
-Maximun draft of 6'
-Roomy and confortable salon.
-2 cabins
-Separate shower
-Sufficient tankerage
-Max budget: 120k$

The boat that interest me so fare is a 1995 Sabre 362 short draft.
Would it be a good and safe boat for long passages?

From what I know, Sabres are really good and quality boats, with great sailing abilities. The only concern I have is the balsa cored hull. Is there known problems about saturated balsa on Sabre hull?
Any comments on Sabre 362?
Any other suggestions for good boats that would meet my criteria?

MichaelL
 

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Hello,

Do you want a boat for today (sailing the great lakes), the near future (caribbean) or the longer term (circumnavigation)?

For today and the near future, there are lots of boats that would meet your needs, anything from any production 40' boat (Catalina, Beneteau, Hunter, Jeanneau, et all), to more classic type boats like Caliber LRC and Island Packet 35.

I have zero experience with long distance cruisers so I can't really offer any advice.

For performance cruiser / racers the Sabre has a great reputation. The Tartan 3500 has a similar reputation.

good luck,
Barry
 

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Of course, I'm biased but IMO the 362 would be fine for the purposes you describe. I know of people who did virtually the same itinerary on a far less capable brand of about the same size.

Regarding the core on this model, I believe that only the topsides were cored. That is, not below the waterline. As many others have indicated on related SailNet posts, it is not a problem on a maintained vessel. On our boat, I didn't even give it a second thought. The surveyor sampled the hull in various locations and all was well. Certainly, any obvious damage should be scrutinized (tip: repairs are virtually impossible to hide on the inside).

Having owned two sabers and crewing on another, I'm fairly knowledgeable of the brand. PM me if you have other questions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for the replies.
To BarryL: That's part of my problem, I want ONE boat to do all that (sailing lake Ontario, Caribbean's, and circumnavigate). I don't want to get in the trouble of selling a boat and shopping for another one when comes the time to set sails for long passages.

To Sabreman: for the cored hull, I read somewhere that the Sabre of the 80's were only cored above the waterline, but for the 90's model like the 362 they used balsa under the waterline as well. I was surprise to learn that Sabre built their boats that way since they have such a great reputation. But I suppose cored hull can last as long as solid fiber glass if built properly!
When you say "the surveyor sampled the hull", do you mean he drilled holes to the inside layers to sample the Balsa, or he only used moisture meter and hammer?
Thank for those precious informations!

MichaelL
 

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he only used moisture meter and hammer?
Yes, she used a moisture meter. She found nothing on the hull, but did find a few small deck locations with higher than normal moisture readings that needed attention. We've owned the boat since 2005 with no further issues.

I don't give the coring a second though and really only think of it when someone asks. If you are still concerned, I strongly recommend contacting Sabre directly and asking for the sites of the most troublesome issues (if any). They are very forthcoming with owner (and potential owner) queries.

I was surprise to learn that Sabre built their boats that way since they have such a great reputation. But I suppose cored hull can last as long as solid fiber glass if built properly!
They do have a great reputation and IMO, it's well deserved. It may sound simplistic, but when I find myself second guessing them, I stop and think about the thousands of hours that went into the boat's design, engineering, and testing. That usually stops me form making a bone-headed, impulse change only to find that the original design was the correct one.

If you find a good, solid 362 that passes survey and is a reasonable price for a Sabre, then I'd suggest buying it. You won't be sorry. There are many cheaper boats on the market, but very few that are more elegant. Good luck in your search.
 

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A properly done cored hull should cause you no concern at all. As long as the outer shell is not compromised then there will be no issues. Stronger, and lighter than a non cored hull. It is a good thing, not bad.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks again for those informations. I'll feel more comfortable doing an offer and having a survey on that boat knowing balsa cored is not a common issue for the Sabre Hull.
 
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