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i have read a lot of threads about stoves on boats. of course, the usual debate is alcohol or propane.

recently, last month actually, a powerboat at the marina my boat is berthed at caught fire and burned up completely. it was a live aboard. the guy was hurt but he lived. he was lucky. he bought another power boat off of their lean dock and moved into it. the cause? his propane stove.

that was a real piece of reality for me. no propane on my boat!

but, there are safety risks with alcohol, too. the threads i have read make that plain. so, the big question i have is what other options are there?

also, how real is the risk with alcohol?

as i get my boat ready to sail, this will be a choice i am going to have to face. it doesn't have a stove but i will want one for cruising. eating out at every port you stp at is going to be way too costly and you can't always be sure you will be stopping at a port for the night. thanks.
One word:

kerosene!
 

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wouldn't a kero cook stove stink like a kero heater? and what about the fumes? kero heaters can kill you. kero is safer to handle than, say, gas.
Kerosene stinks if it is not properly vaporized. For instance, if you put it in an oil lamp (with a wick), that will happen. Or if your stove/oven is not properly maintained or operated.

If properly vaporized, good quality kerosene has no smell.

Fumes: yet, if you spill it, it will smell. But it will not explode and it will burn only with difficulty (you can throw a match in a puddle of kerosene and it will not burn). It will also smell if not properly vaporized (typically not enough pre-heating).

Kero heaters can kill you if you operate them without enough fresh air (carbon monoxide poisoning). This applies to ANY open flame heater (kero, gas, wood, coal, ...).

So, in summary, the worst consequence of poor maintenance or poor operation of a kerosene stove is that it smells. For LPG, it is instant death of the operator and anyone else on board.

Which one do you choose?
 

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Did his boat explode?
(It was more her boat than his, actually. Anyway.)

No, it did not explode.

And your point is? I don't even know what stove they had on the boat (they have since moved). Let us assume it was indeed gas.

Then you have clearly shown that there is ONE boat with an LPG system that did NOT immediately blow up. Even though it was certainly possible, just as the boat that exploded this week because of the rat bite.

I would feel so much better now if I had a gas system.
 

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Let me take a minute and explain how a properly used and maintained propane system works very simply. There is a shut off at the tank it should be shut off IE NO FUEL IN LINE OR BOAT. RTFM :)
I couldn't even think of replying to this any better than bljones does in the previous posting
 

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"Kerosene stinks if it is not properly vaporized. "

MastUndSchotbruch-
Everyone has a different reason for why their own kerosene doesn't stink. But the bottom line is that some of us can smell the kerostink no matter what quality kerosense (paraffin oil) you are using. No matter how you trim your wicks. No matter how you tune your engines. (Diesel.)
The stuff always burns with an odor, some people simply are unable to detect it.

There are in fact genetic components that explain why some people simply cannot smell, or test, various compounds. Kerostink hasn't been researched, but I'd bet it is just another one of them.

Last time I won a nice bet, everyone said "Oh, those two beers taste exactly a like." Sure, just like Coke and Pepsi.
Oh, I can smell burning kerosene just fine. In fact, it gives me a headache.

BUT: That is if it is burned, not vaporized in a properly functioning pressurized cooker. I have a lamp (the type with a wick) and, just as you are saying, that stinks whether the wick is trimmed well or not. Much worse for a poorly trimmed wick, when it soots.

But you don't seem to understand that the chemistry is different with a pressurized stove that transforms the liquid fuel into a gas, using a heated generator. It is this gas which is then burned, and that process is odorless.
 

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I didn't see anyone mention this yet. You are 55 times more likely to have an electrical fire aboard than a stove fire! 24 times greater risk of an engine fire. This concern over galley fuel is not ones primary risk. Get whatever stove you like and mange it properly. Propane or not.

Why Boats Catch Fire - Seaworthy - BoatUS
Interesting.

However, this is about fires, not explosions. I suppose the statistics includes galley fires caused by liquid (and solid) fuels. But if there is a propane leak, the result is not a fire but BOOOOM :eek:
 

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I really doubt that would make much different in the overall results. The point stands, if you one is worried about fire, one should rip out all their electrical systems and revert to LED headlamps, charts and a sextant, long before worrying about propane (assuming its installed correctly).
You make it sound as if gas explosions happen so rarely that there is no point paying attention to the problem.

Wasn't there a case just last week where a cruiser was likely killed by a gas explosion? (the guy with the Norwegian wife/girl friend). I am not sure all the facts are in on that one but that seemed the most likely explanation for his death.

And the week before another one, where a rat chewed on the propane line (and was photographed paddling away).

Even with all these deaths, gas explosions may still be rare occurrencies but I prefer to better my odds. I sleep better with my guaranteed non-exploding kerosene stove and oven...
 

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No, that's not what I said.

I said that it would not make a difference in the overall results and that assumes they aren't already included in the galley fire stats.

With electrical and engines comprising roughly 80% of all boat fires and galleys making up only 1%, there is no way that "explosions" cover the gap. Galley fuel is not nearly your number one fire hazard aboard. Concern over fire is what started this thread.
True. "If you have (uncontrolled) ignition of propane on your boat, the resulting fire is the least of your problems" :D
 

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kerosene stinks when burning, so isnt like yer gonna sit inside with the doors shut and breathe this stink.
We have discussed this several times in this thread (you may want to read it). You are confounded about kerosene burnt through a wick and through a generator. The first stinks, the second doesn't.

I don't know what makes you think that there is no kerosene available in Mexico. It is correct that consumption at the end consumer level is way down, probably due to replacement by other light and energy sources. Still, in 2010 (last data available), the country still used 430 barrels a year: Mexico Kerosene Consumption by Year (Thousand Barrels per Day)

Oh, and if there weren't any kerosene, they wouldn't be flying planes (Jet A fuel is kerosene).
 

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ok. get here to mexico and try to buy it. it is not for sale to citizens nor turistas. it is for government use only.
i am here in mexico finding that which i need and learning about that which is unavailable and you argue with me. this is hy larry us. definitely troll behaviour, thankyou very much. i have beeen writing from mexico fro over three years now.
i have actually been thanked when folks meet me for the info i post for them.
Why are you so defensive? We are discussing availability of cooking fuels, for crying out loud! How aggressive do you get when the Really Important Questions of life are discussed, like "what is the best anchor?" :D

I may be a lame ****** in Northville but I can operate machinery like Google. When I put in "kerosene in mexico," it does not tell me anything about kero having suddenly become a controlled substance down there that mere mortals are not even allowed to sniff. Instead, it gives me Yellow Pages to gas stations that sell the stuff (e.g. Mexico Kerosene in Mexico MO Yellow Pages by Superpages). Are you telling me all these gas stations are part of a secret government program where only the military fills up their jerrycans?
 

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Actually, the Mexico to which that page refers is Mexico, MO (Missouri).
Ooops! We need an emoticon 'wiping egg from my face' :p

Looking at the indexmundi numbers that I referenced to earlier, there is no question that kerosene consumption is much lower than it used to be, for whatever reason. But the fact that Zeehag cannot find it in his immediate neighborhood (and that his local friends tell him they can't either) does not prove that the stuff has entirely disappeared in the whole country. In particular since the published numbers says otherwise.

At the very least, every single airport in the country has it by the thousands of gallons...
 
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