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just to add to the discussion I used an origo twin pop down burner alcohol stove that came with my international folkboat really cool stove that stowed as a unit like a locker than simply popped down for use...

safe easy to use the only drawback was expense buying fuel even in california...

the flame was almost impossible to see its was low btys so boiling water for coco or a ramen was not exactly instant and it could be on and you wouldnt know about it unless you put your hand over it...

but Im a cook so flames dont scare me that bad as Im used to flare ups and whatnot...

so its understable to have a natural bad reaction to gas stoves and the like but it can be made simply on any fuel really

just use some common sense and prudency
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
BJ I'm currently using this system as I rebuild my galley and they are great but also VERY dangerous and have a history of blowing to high hell. We have a ten minute max before we enter the danger zone. That being said when we took a knock down this summer "captains fault" we taco'd the stove, our second lost stove to date "captain needs to install reef lines" and it was about 24 bucks to replace. Finding fuel can be a challenge. I would guess I have used these about 1500 meals to date and love it minus fear of early entrance to heaven
you are talking about butane?
 

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Can propane explode? Sure. Is it too risky? Do its benefits outweigh its risks? Well, that's an entirely subjective calculation that everyone has to answer for himself.

I will note that lots of houses (at least in New England) are HEATED by propane. Many homes across the country have propane gas fireplaces. Of course, many more homes are heated with natural gas (and have gas stoves and fireplaces.) Occasionally, some of those explode. Of course, lots of houses burn down because of electrical fires. Most things are not completely safe, but risks can be minimized and managed.

I have propane on my boat and and fine with it. But when I bought her, I replaced all the propane lines and valves with new. I put in a new stove with a thermocouple (the old one did not have that safety feature.) I have a solenoid and a sniffer. And I'm annal about turning the gas off at the tank every time I'm not using it and letting the gas burn out of the lines before I shut the appliance off.

Bottom line is that I think propane is very safe if used with care. I think that goes for most things. Turn off the brain and things can go south in a hurry for a whole basket of reasons...
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·

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see......that's what worries me about propane. it does happen. and it happened in my marina. that's kind of close to home. too close to totally ignore.
just to add to the fire that thread has foul play as one of the causes...

whatever the case just do your research and you will be rewarded wth tons of info

if I ever solo sail again on a small boat I repeat that james baldwins kerosene gimballed cooker is hard to beat

:)
 

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I had these same fears of cooking with propane, alcohol, butane, etc...

My solution... I removed the original Origo stove which was in great condition but felt it better to use something more safe... what did I do... installed an induction stove into the galley opening and never looked back. I have a 3000 watt pure sine wave inverter that runs the unit and since it's very efficient there is no need to worry about battery usage... haven't had a problem all the time I was using the stove on the boat and my wife that would have been non-skilled on the alcohol stove doesn't have a worry now... it is the first thing my next boat will have... all induction cooking/baking. :)

I do have a camp stove w/butane in the boat stored away for when we drop anchor on some shore and cook our foods with that.

I kept the Origo stove to replace back on the boat if when selling the buyer wants the alcohol stove... I put it in storage.

I will say it again... I have no worries ever again with the sort of worries others have with these types of flammable fuels. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
I like the simplicity of my non- pressurized alcohol stove. Yeah, lower energy potential than Porpane, but unless you do all of your cooking on high flame, the actual difference is pretty negligible on a small burner, small footprint marine stove. An over or a large footprint burner would be a different story.

another advantage of a small alcohol stove is the "hoseless" portability. want to do a fondue or grill night with friends in the cockpit? Bring the alcohol stove outside, put it on the cockpit table, and you are good to go.

Another "safe" alternative is small butane ranges. 2-Burner Butane Countertop Range / Portable Stove with Brass Burners

Not as durable as a stainless steel alcohol range, but at the price, you could buy one a year for 10 years before the cost difference is eaten up.
holy hot plate batman! that is cheap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
just to add to the fire that thread has foul play as one of the causes...

whatever the case just do your research and you will be rewarded wth tons of info

if I ever solo sail again on a small boat I repeat that james baldwins kerosene gimballed cooker is hard to beat

:)
that's the reason for the thread. i want to learn before i decide. i will have to look into that type of cooker. i am used to handling kero.
 

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I had these same fears of cooking with propane, alcohol, butane, etc...

My solution... I removed the original Origo stove which was in great condition but felt it better to use something more safe... what did I do... installed an induction stove into the galley opening and never looked back. I have a 3000 watt pure sine wave inverter that runs the unit and since it's very efficient there is no need to worry about battery usage... haven't had a problem all the time I was using the stove on the boat and my wife that would have been non-skilled on the alcohol stove doesn't have a worry now... it is the first thing my next boat will have... all induction cooking/baking. :)

I do have a camp stove w/butane in the boat stored away for when we drop anchor on some shore and cook our foods with that.

I kept the Origo stove to replace back on the boat if when selling the buyer wants the alcohol stove... I put it in storage.

I will say it again... I have no worries ever again with the sort of worries others have with these types of flammable fuels. ;)
induction cooker are great...they are very popular in europe and especially france and spain and beleive it or not they are highly regarded by chefs in modern cooking...

MODERN COOKING IS LESS FLAME USE BTW...jajaja

I would live and induction cooker on a boat if I had good space to keep it working with panels, wind power etc...and a nice inverter like you have

they are very cool I think but budget wise not for me yet
 

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Blow through a straw and you will create 100 times more pressure that is coming through the regulator, very low pressure system. It stinks to holy heaven, I can't imagine how anyone could miss a leak. One last note just because you get a leak doesn't mean your boat will blow up. You have to be an extra special type of moron to blow your boat up with propane. :)
Propane low pressure regulators are factory set at 3 PSI. if you can blow 100 times more PSI than that, id have to say you have been practicing.:)

Also someone mentioned that he/she only opens the valve 1/2 turn. Propane valves are double sealing valves and as such need to be all the way open or all the way closed or they can leak past the stem packing. How many super smart propane users knew that. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 · (Edited)
reading the link provided by multihullgirl doesn't make me feel all that good about propane or butane. i definately will be keeping them on the back burner ( sorry. i couldn't help it. it was such an obvious pun. it would have been negligent not to have gone there ) as i check out non-pressurized alcohol, CNG, electric, and induction.


strike that. induction and electric are out because of battery needs. just non-pressurized alcohol and CNG to choose from....oh, and kero.
 

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The only problem with electric stoves, whether conventional electric or induction, is that you need a pretty hefty power source (usually a gen-set or shore power). I doubt a Cal 27-1 is going to have a gen-set, so you would be limited to cooking in places where you can get shore power. You can get a combo electric-alcohol (non-pressurized) stove from Origo, but they're pretty pricey. I used to keep a little electric hotplate on my boat so that I wouldn't need to burn alcohol at the dock, but I decided that it was just easier to used the alcohol stove even at the dock.
 
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