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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
A customer asked me how to safely moor this boat in a storm.

In the second picture you can just barely see the mooring pennant going to the starboard cleat.

Chafing gear, double pennants, a bridle, removing the anchor are all standard practice. But with this configuration I don't see how they will prevent the rode cutter on the bow from doing what it does best. I see no reasonable option, what about you?

What do you think, am I missing any ideas?



 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
While just using cleats is what people do the question was in reference to severe storms.
In that case if the boat swings side to side and plunges up and down the bow protuberances can catch the pennant.

The above boat seems to me to be designed in such a way that their is nothing that can be done to prevent it.

This boat was beached in a storm.
As you can see a very small protuberance was caught and broken and two pennants were severed.

 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
david, I would say you have three choices:
1- Haul before any storm. Obviously what the builder intended.
2- Replace the crap on the bow with a retractable? removable? stronger & better? fitting
3- Possibly the simplest and strongest solution, install interior reinforcing and then a strong point / mooring eye down low to the waterline. Bit of a PITA to transfer the lines to it unless you keep some type of short line or bridle rigged down to it, but that gives you a strong point with nothing to chafe against it, and no need to undo and redo the current fittings, which are certainly of some use for lunch hooks.

What company built that huge daysailer anyway?
Beneteau 43 Sense (2013)

I like option 3
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Assuming 2 bow cleats

cleat a line, pass through the pendant loop and cleat to the opposite side. Repeat with another line going in the opposite direction. The boat should be wearing a necklace now. Then, this may be stupid, I tie the ends together with reef knots. I think the front of the boat will have to shear to loose this setup.
I visualize the bow surging up and down and sideways enough to catch one side of your neck less and cutting it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Assuming 2 bow cleats

cleat a line, pass through the pendant loop and cleat to the opposite side. Repeat with another line going in the opposite direction. The boat should be wearing a necklace now. Then, this may be stupid, I tie the ends together with reef knots. I think the front of the boat will have to shear to loose this setup.
I visualize the bow surging up and down and sideways enough to catch one side of your neckless and cutting it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
What happens when you use the bow cleats or add chocks





It seems to be the 100% solution in Northport
It works fine as long as the bow doesn't surge up and down 3 to 4 feet what is what caused the loss of the boat in my picture above.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Add a bow "Storm Hoop" to the boat's stores. Essentially a circular hoop of 1" diameter Stainless slightly larger in diameter that the width of the bow roller assembly with welded tabs that align with the bow roller side plates at the center of the hoop on either side that extend fore and aft of the hoop and held in place with 1/4" fast pins. You might have to drill a couple of 1/4" diameter holes along the center lines of the outer side plates through which the fast pins pass but that will not effect their bending strength. The hoop will hold the bridle lines away from the bow roller assembly and, being smooth, should not chafe the bridle lines (although one would need to add chafing gear to the lines to be on the safe side). Not a tough fix and not very expensive considering the potentials.

FWIW...
Very interesting solution. Have you ever seen this or better yet have pictures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Long past, I suppose, are the days when the owner of a $350K+ 43-footer already had a pretty good idea how to prep his boat for a storm... :)
Some good ideas but what kind of cheap ass boat are you talking about.:) This one was 400k on sale because the guy that commissioned it changed his mind and went for the 50' model so the dealer had to clear this one from inventory.

It has a LOT of extras on it.
It does not have dock and go just an 8k bow thruster.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
During Sandy the boats on Yale Maximoor pendants did not fare as well as those with three strand nylon pendants with decent chafing gear. A Beneteau 35.5 chafed through two brand new 1" maximoor pendants. The clear winner was the Cyclone Dynema Mooring pendant - no failures.

Boats that hauled fared worse than those stayed on a mooring. a nearby yard lost every boat they hauled. When I reapplied for insurance, the underwriter wanted a named storm action plan; hauling was not an acceptable choice.
Wow
 
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