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That's what the charter company taught us to do so I figure they're fairly concerned about their 1/4 million dollar boat in the hands of an unknown. If one line goes down, the other is still there. The thrust should be down on the entire bow, not sideways on a single cleat.
 

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Dyneema pendant...

"Seaworthy contacted the owner of Nantucket Moorings, Dennis Metcalfe, to see how the Dyneema pendants fared when Irene came ashore in Nantucket with gusts to 65 mph. His reply: "We didn't lose a single boat." Metcalfe said in the three years Nantucket Moorings has been using Dyneema, he has never seen any signs of chafe."

From ... Good Night Irene And Good Riddance - Seaworthy Magazine - BoatUS
 

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I don't know, david. It seems like that boat was not only a special deal, but obviously it is a factory second. Huh? Yup, a factory second. Someone clipped out the labels! There's no seahorse at the fore of the cove stripe (standard trim) and no BENETEAU branding on the lower stripe at the bow.

So as they say in that other rag trade, that's not a Beneteau, that's a factory second.(G)

The bow hardware appears to be "stock" /vs/ the one in B's online brochures and PR pictures, sure enough. Maybe they got so happy about traveler arches and twin wheels and woopee stern configurations, that the designers just forgot about the pointy end?

I think if I'd dropped $400k on a yacht, even $300k on a yacht, and it came with inadequate provision for a simple mooring line, I'd start rabble rousing. I'd gently remind Beneteau that this is a serious omission which merits their attention. (Translation: RECALL AND REFIT) and if Beneteau didn't think there was any merit in that, I'd start chatting up fellow owners and the sailing press. Not just the web sites, but the magazines. And the various "safety committees".

For that kind of bucks, and a builder with that much experience, a kludge job for a primary safety system really shouldn't be necessary.

Beneteau might just step up.
 

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Dyneema pendant...

"Seaworthy contacted the owner of Nantucket Moorings, Dennis Metcalfe, to see how the Dyneema pendants fared when Irene came ashore in Nantucket with gusts to 65 mph. His reply: "We didn't lose a single boat." Metcalfe said in the three years Nantucket Moorings has been using Dyneema, he has never seen any signs of chafe."

From ... Good Night Irene And Good Riddance - Seaworthy Magazine - BoatUS
What I see is a big plug for Dynema, but I don't see any information on the circumstances for the chafing of a Yale Maxi-Moor, and its failure. Can you share that information?
I'm sure that while the Dynema people will be happy, those of us with Maxi-Moor's as well as Yale rope itself would love to know more specifics. One of the listings also said that boats with SS survived but none without it did.

This site(http://forums.sbo.sailboatowners.com/printthread.php?t=131027) notes that in Falmouth, ME, with 1100 boats, they've never seen a Yale tech pendant fail. IMO, anyone who leaves their boat out in a hurricane has all bets off. But even so....

So inquiring minds would like specifics... at least this inquiring mind, since he has a Yale Pendant.
 

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During Sandy the boats on Yale Maximoor pendants did not fare as well as those with three strand nylon pendants with decent chafing gear. A Beneteau 35.5 chafed through two brand new 1" maximoor pendants. The clear winner was the Cyclone Dynema Mooring pendant - no failures.

Boats that hauled fared worse than those stayed on a mooring. a nearby yard lost every boat they hauled. When I reapplied for insurance, the underwriter wanted a named storm action plan; hauling was not an acceptable choice.
Sorry you could not pay enough me to use three strand for mooring pendants. Blanket statements do no one any good....

I am lucky enough to know the Yale brothers and be in a Yale test bed mooring field. There is NO COMPARISON when all is equal between a polyester Maxi-Moor Pendant and a three strand...

The "rest of the story" is what needs close examination before definitive statements like that can be made.

I have been investigating mooring failures after storms here in the NE for well over 20 years. Yale pendants are hands down more robust in regards to chafe than any three strand in both factory chafing tests and real world examples.

My neighbors boat ORINOCO with dual brand new (a few weeks old) three strand pendants. This is how close we actually are:


This is ORINOCO drifting away after she parted both three strand pendants:


This is what was left of ORINOCO's pendants. One still had the chafe sleeve on it....


Our boat suffered a slight wear spot in the outer Cordura chafe sleeve on the primary pendant. ORINCO was found washed up many miles away and suffered keel damage.

This was after a short duration storm with peak winds of just 32 knots. This pendant was toast as were about 15% of the three strand pendants I inspected for chock hard spots..

Not a single Maxi-Moor I inspected had a single hard spot....

 

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#1 Drill two holes as far forward in the bow protuberance as you can.

#2 Rig a yoke to port and starboard side of protuberance.

#3 Attach the spare spin halyard to yoke it and snug it tight.

#4 When the bow dives, and is off to one side, the pendants can not override the anchor roller and will slough off the yoke..
The foregoing is similar to the concept of the Storm Hoop described earlier and effectively deals with the possibility of the lee rode becoming hooked over the top of the anchor sprit when the bow is driven down. But, it will not prevent the rode becoming entrapped/chafing on the underside of the sprit when the bow is elevated and driven off to leeward by the winds. A Storm Hoop should do that in most cases. Even better, however, would be your suggestion above coupled with a line from the forward end of the sprit to an eye affixed to the stem at/near the waterline, passed through a heavy rubber tube to act as a roller. With that, which will make a relatively sharp vertical angle, the lee rode could not become entrapped and loading on the "dolphin striker" line would tend to push the bow back to windward.

Thinking (kind of) out loud...
 

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During Sandy the boats on Yale Maximoor pendants did not fare as well as those with three strand nylon pendants with decent chafing gear. A Beneteau 35.5 chafed through two brand new 1" maximoor pendants. The clear winner was the Cyclone Dynema Mooring pendant - no failures.

Boats that hauled fared worse than those stayed on a mooring. a nearby yard lost every boat they hauled. When I reapplied for insurance, the underwriter wanted a named storm action plan; hauling was not an acceptable choice.

I'm VERY curious who you insure with.


BoatUS crunches the data after every storm. They noted that Sandy was something of an anomaly since so many hauled boats were damaged, but they still recommend hauling before a named storm - so strongly that they will pay half the cost to haul and re-launch - because years worth of data says that's where you're safest.

I would bet that if you looked at the FEMA flood maps for New Jersey and New York you could correlate which marinas suffered surge damage.

In our case I decided to go upriver from our marina on Barnegat Bay to one that was six feet higher on the elevation maps. Our marina had quite a few boats damaged by the surge, where I hauled no boats were damaged. The water didn't even get up over the parking lot.

If my insurance company made that kind of blanket statement I'd find another company (sorry for the thread drift).
 
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