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Discussion Starter #1
So this will be our first full season on the great lakes (Erie) on our new to us Catalina 30. We will be doing mostly daysailing with an occasional overnight trip thrown in. I am just wondering what you all think is recommended safety gear on top of the required coast guard stuff.

So far we have Inflatable PFD's with harnesses, thru hull plugs, and a radar reflector. I have been thinking of getting a spare handheld VHF and GPS. What other stuff should we have for the type of sailing we are doing? I don't want overkill but I have seen what this lake can become in no time.

Thanks

Joe
 

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If you have pfd's with harnesses you should get the tethers and jackilnes as well. Mount U bolts with backing plates in the cockpit corners.

First aid kit
MOB pole
Maybe a life sling
Rigging knife for everyone
Waterproof flashlight
Hand bearing compass
 
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ASA recommendations

The American Sailing Assn. has a good list of recommended safety items in addition to USCG required items.

ASA Recommended Safety Equipment

• Two anchors with at least 200’ of rode
• Charts
• VHF radio
• Safety harnesses, jacklines, tethers
• Compass
• First aid kit
• Manual bilge pump
• Flashlights
• Tool kit and spare parts
• Soft wood plugs

Other ASA recommended items

• Heaving line
• Mirror
• Searchlight/spotlight
• Sunburn lotion
• Sunglasses
• binoculars
 

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So this will be our first full season on the great lakes (Erie) on our new to us Catalina 30.
Congratulations! Don't forget to join the Catalina 30 owners association as well as the Yahoo email list.

You'll want to keep a sharp eye on the water temperature and make sure that you dress for the water temp as much as or even more so than for the air temp.

Also, be sure to leave a float plan with someone back home. I usually email mine to two people.

We learned early on to make sure we had the proper tools to fix anything that might happen with our (then) original engine. Tow insurance is a great investment.

We also carry a spotlight. It's good for illuminating your sail for visibility and also to shine in front of you to see debris before you hit it.

There's plenty of other safety gear you could carry. I don't know what your threshold for "overkill" is. I tend to think that anything that keeps me safe or highly visible isn't overkill.
 

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You might consider putting together a "ditch bag" with duplicates of some of the items suggested here. While this may be overkill for coastal cruising and daysailing in the Great Lakes, it's offers simple peace of mind. We've carried a ditch bag from day one.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I guess I forgot a few things we already have.

Lifesling
Rigging knives
Flashlights
2 Anchors
First Aid Kit
Signal Mirror
Dye Marker
Several types of flares

My Stantion bases have the U's on them so I was going to use those for my jacklines and I do plan to get tethers.

My threshold for overkill is pretty high, I would much rather buy it and never need it than need it one day and wish I would have bought it.
I really wasn't thinking about a ditch bag though, we don't have a raft so if we ditch, were swimming.....
 

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......I really wasn't thinking about a ditch bag though, we don't have a raft so if we ditch, were swimming.....
Not strictly speaking safety equipment, but if you're coastal cruising the experience is greatly opened up by anchoring and avoiding marinas.. in which case you should have some sort of tender/dinghy.

Worst case you abandon ship to that, so the 'ditch bag' may be a thought anyhow.. and even swimming you might be able to call for help if there's a handheld VHF in there... It should also hold your ID, Passports, etc so you don't lose those, esp if you're crossing borders.
 

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Jacklines

I'd not use stanchons for the jacklines. On my boat, the cleats are postioned well for jackline use. If your cleats won't work, then install U-bolts (i.e. padeyes) as jackdale suggested.

Some other safety items I carry: handheld VHF stored in the microwave (in case of lightning strike), Lifesling, heaving line, and assorted hacksaws to cut away standing rig in the event of a rig failure. All of our PFDs have a whistle attached and are marked with reflective tape front and back. At night, each crew carries a chemlite (light stick).

On my wish list is a MOB pole/life buoy combination that will also trigger the MOB function on the chartplotter.
 

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Barquito
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This might be obvious, but, the correct attitude toward safety may be just as important as all the stuff. For example, clipping in while alone on deck, teaching all onboard how to start the motor, practicing MOB, etc.
 

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My Stantion bases have the U's on them so I was going to use those for my jacklines and I do plan to get tethers.
Many (most?) stantion bases are neither trough-bolted (many are screwed on) nor have backing plates capable of holding 5,000 pounds (yes, the forces are that high, because of the tight-rope effect).

Bow cleats are generally fine, but the stern cleats are too far back (you can go off the back). Thus, Jackdales recomendation for in-cockpit u-bolts. Remember that the clip on the u-bolt end MUST be a locking biner; they come off easy.

(some calculations about fall energy)
Sail Delmarva: Sample Calculations for Jackline Stress and Energy Absorption
 

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Discussion Starter #11
My stantion bases have U's welded. I always thought those were for jacklines's or to tether directly to.
I just got 6 new type 1's with reflective tape. All will get a whistle and chemlite (at nite).
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Oh I see. Mine are through bolted but the backing plates are obvisly not up to the job. Can someone give some more details on the U bolts and how/ where I need to mount them?
 

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You could do the calculations for the area and depth required for the plates based on the forces associated with crew going overboard on a jackline/tether/harness arrangement. Could also just use the lowest breaking strength of the jackline/tether/harness components. The thinking is you don't need an attachment point that greatly exceed the breaking point of what attachs to it (but still exceeds, say by 20 to 50%).

Jackdales recommendation was for u-bolts in the cockpit, now that I read it again. It is a really good idea to have points you can tether to while in the cockpit so you stay in the cockpit. If tethered to the jackline running from stern to bow, you could be swept from the cockpit. I simply wrap my tether around the backstay when I am in the cockpit. Haven't done the math, but am confident the backstay will support the forces and the distance isn't so much that I'd end up being dragged behind the boat.
 

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Barquito
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Haven't done the math, but am confident the backstay will support the forces and the distance isn't so much that I'd end up being dragged behind the boat.
I may not be picturing this right, but, it seems that being teathered to the backstay would not keep you from going over the transom.
 

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A fifth of Snake Bite Medicine is always a good thing t have on hand -- ya' never know.
 
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