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I'd be a bit concerned about firing guns in a crowded anchorage or marina... you might find that what you're defending yourself against eventually isn't an intruder, but is a negligent homicide charge when you kill the person sleeping on deck on the boat 50 yards away on a hot night. Whether the gun is legal or not, it's fair to consider the unintended consequences of self-defense, which won't protect you from injuring or killing someone you DIDN'T mean to shoot.
 

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Well I guess I'll throw out another slightly varied view. Things have changed. Opioids have changed the landscape...
...We are no longer living in the world we grew up in. The decision is not an easy one. Just sayin', things have changed.

It is not the world we grew up in, it is a much safer world. At least the US is.





Murder and violent crime rates peaked in 1992 and are now about half of what they were then.

In the last two years there has been a small uptick (not shown in the graphs) but the rates are still historically very low; even with the uptick they're lower than 2010.

Politicians and pundits are fond of cherry-picking data by taking one area or city (Chicago, for instance) and then claiming that the whole nation in a crime wave. They get loud cheers and high ratings, but they are wrong. We are not in a crime wave.

(This is not to say there are not localized areas with very high crime, or that opioids are not a problem. Don't do drugs, always exercise caution, etc.)
 

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I was going to say, every older generation feels that crime is worse than in their "good old days".

I know that, in my town, our home burglary and shooting rate are greater than it was 50 years ago,.........but the population has doubled in the past 50 years.

I took to the highway in 1972 hitchhiking, in search of the "real America". My dad begged me not to do it. He noted that he hitchhiked some, during the war years of the 1940's, but he said that times had changed and that it was not safe like it was in his day. He pointed out that there were things in the 70's that were game changers. There were drugged out people high on PCP, Qualudes, heroin, LSD and, the demon weed, Marijuana. Over the next ten years I hitchhiked over 55,000 miles. I hitched from St. Louis to Baltimore and back twice. I hitched from St. Louis to Memphis several times and from St. Louis to Rockford Illinois. I hitched from St. Louis to Sacramento and from Sacramento to Redding and then down to Barstow. I never had any bad experience and I was often invited to stay with people I met. I never carried a weapon.

My father had predicted that I wouldn't be able to get far because, since the times had become so dangerous, nobody would be willing to pick up hitchhikers, like they did in his day. He said, "Nobody is going to want to pick you up in this day and age. It's just too risky. There is no way I would ever pick up a hitchhiker."

After my first trip to Baltimore, I called my parents to tell them that I had made it safely with only five rides. On the way back, I met a young couple from Sweden who were travelling across the US for their first time here. I took them home and put them up at my parent's house. After that, my dad started picking up hitchhikers who reminded him of me because he hated the idea of his son being left on the road without a ride. He often told me of the interesting young people he met.

But then, that was in the good old days. ;-)
 

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The greatest danger I face as a cruiser is getting hit by a texting driver while I ride my bike around Penang...
 

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I'm grateful for the firearms safety training that I have had in my life and I don't understand why some people object to such training and view it as some limitation to our rights.
What are your thoughts in having to take a speech safety course before you are allowed to post on Sailnet or a voting safety course before you can go to the ballot box?

As for the OP, I think you will find that keeping a secured firearm on a US flagged vessel vs carrying it in a foreign country are two different matters. Whether or not you need to one depends. I surely wouldn't cruise anywhere near Africa or Venezuela without some firepower on board.
 

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What are your thoughts in having to take a speech safety course before you are allowed to post on Sailnet or a voting safety course before you can go to the ballot box?

As for the OP, I think you will find that keeping a secured firearm on a US flagged vessel vs carrying it in a foreign country are two different matters. Whether or not you need to one depends. I surely wouldn't cruise anywhere near Africa or Venezuela without some firepower on board.
I don't have any objection to drivers education or making people take a drivers test to get a license. Automobiles are dangerous.

I was looking at guns in a pawn shop the other day. There were some young guys in there looking at bargain priced handguns who seemed like clueless idiots. It scared me to think they can carry a gun. And, in our state, they can carry it conceled. The shoppers included a couple of guys who had brought their girlfriends, who were getting absolutely giddy about the thought of buying their first gun. They couldn't decide between the pink one or the blue one.

There are some people who should not drive, and some who should not be allowed to carry a gun around in public. I have some in my family.

One of my nitwit nephews announced the other day that he wants to buy a gun. He has seen some cool ones that he can buy with his next paycheck at the pawn shop for under $250. He has never shown any interest before and his parents know nothing. He held his first pistol in his hand, ever, a week ago, at the pawn shop. I asked him why he wants to buy a gun and he said, "cause I'm twenty-one now, and I can". I asked what he needs it for and he said that he thought that it would be cool to have one and show it off to his friends. I asked him if he intends to keep it loaded and he said, "I dunno, probably".

I offered to take him to the pistol range with my gun and teach him basic safety skills, or I told him where he could take a class, if he prefers to learn from a professional. He said he didn't want to "bother with that kind of stuff" he just wants a gun to play with. I told him that, if he buys a gun without taking some safety training, he will not be allowed to bring it in my home or on my property.

We had a perfectly good Conceal and Carry law in our state that required a brief safety course that included some education about when you can legally use your gun. Our new governor signed a law allowing ANYBODY to carry a conceled weapon. We now have people brandishing guns in road rage encounters. Back in July we had a young punk pull out a pistol in a local nightclub and shoot a warning shot into the ceiling when some other bar patrons laughed at him when he got turned down by a girl. The only thing that was illegal about his actions was discharging a weapon in town, without just cause. But then he was unaware of the law. He had just heard, at the pawn shop, that it was perfectly legal for him to carry it conceled, for his protection. He said that he felt threatened when people laughed at him.

Movingrightalong, if you are a sensible, capable and responsible gun owner, these people who aren't should concern you. They give the rest of us a bad name, and they are dangerous.

I think that gun safety is a little different than free speech.
 

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What are your thoughts in having to take a speech safety course before you are allowed to post on Sailnet or a voting safety course before you can go to the ballot box?

As for the OP, I think you will find that keeping a secured firearm on a US flagged vessel vs carrying it in a foreign country are two different matters. Whether or not you need to one depends. I surely wouldn't cruise anywhere near Africa or Venezuela without some firepower on board.
I ride motorcycles and I feel the same way about those. I got my first bike when I was 16 and I knew nothing. I learned motorcycle defensive driving by trial and error over years. Then, when I was older, and started touring, I read motorcycle magazines to learn safety and defensive driving strategies. I was dangerous until I was about twenty and actually learned to ride safely. I had a few close calls, due to errors by other drivers, and it is by shear luck that I survived. I know some kids from youth who did not. One nineteen year old friend lost his right leg to a car driver who ran a red light. I now believe my parents were naive fiools to have let me have a bike at 16, with no more training than I had.

Both of my kids talked about getting motorcycles or scooters when they were teens. I forbade it because neither of them are very attentive drivers. They both balked at allowing me to teach them defensive driving strategies. They thought it was hypocritical of me to deny them one, when I own two. I offered to teach them to ride, saying that my instruction program would start in the car, to review defensive driving strategies.

They both balked at that. They think that they can just get on a bike and ride, and it will be safe. When my son turned 18 he announced that he may buy a motorcycle and that I couldn't stop him then. He still lived with us and I told him he wouldn't be able to ever park it at home because, if he ever brought it on our property, I would disable it until he agreed to learn to ride it safely.
 

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Different places are different.
Have cousin lives in Montana. Real risk of cougars eating your child at the bus stop. Have no issue with moms having a 1911 in the glove compartment.
Was brought up in Manhattan. Don't want halfwits having conceal/carry there. No issue with Sullivan law.
Libertarian in basic view. Do what you want but don't place me at risk without my prior consent.
BTW a fire extinguisher in the face is a decent deterrent and legal on a boat everywhere.
 

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Aside from the fast $25 (more in distant places I'll bet) that it would cost to replace the used extinguisher, which is cheaper than recharging it, have you ever fired one off in a confined space?

That British yachting magazine that sometimes posts videos while they are rolling over a hull or cutting holes in it or doing hands-on mayhem, also posted one of an extinguisher being used below deck.

It creates a maelstrom of yellow powder that gets in YOUR eyes, hair, teeth, lungs, just as much as the other guy. And that yellow powder also corrodes the hell out of electrical circuits and appliances, like your stove. And is a bear to clean up.

If you've got no other choices, sure. But you do not want to "plan" for firing off a powder extinguisher below deck. Or upwind at all.

There are better and cheaper things you can put in a spray bottle or buy in a pressurized can. Heck, even a can of spray paint will do. "Just look for the guy with the purple face. Although a plain $2 can of cheap hair spray is even easier to clean up. And a can of wasp spray can reach out over 20 feet from you.
 

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Thanks for the above ideas. My thinking was every one has or should have a fire extinguisher in every sleeping compartment, galley and engine room. One is is always close to hand. Between getting hurt and cleaning up a mess I would take cleaning up a mess. Admittedly this is a last resort so agree with you but as the propellant comes out its at a freezing temperature so the one who's face it's aimed at will be quite disabled . My personal plan is different but not shared for the trolls nor do I want to share in order to preserve the novelty. In terms of spray cans bear repellent seems to get good reviews. Surprisingly wasp spray doesn't.
 

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" Between getting hurt and cleaning up a mess I would take cleaning up a mess. Admittedly this is a last resort so agree with you but as the propellant comes out its at a freezing temperature"
Next time I use one (we drill with them often) I'll have to stick a hand in there. I've never noticed anything "freezing" about them, they are NOT CO2 extinguishers. Even with the larger dry powder extinguishers, I've never noticed any cold or received any warning about that.
Instead...we are cautioned to wear eye and mouth (filter) protection because that damned yellow powder is going to get in everything and everyone, and it is not good stuff. Respiratory and eye irritant. If you think cleaning it up is easy...you haven't had to do so yet. You will find it penetrates places where you are sure it couldn't get, and it just keeps coming back after you've cleaned it "all" out.
You really need to USE one, to appreciate the stuff. Personally I prefer CO2 or water, but even a "freezing" CO2 spray is easily batted away with an arm. With yellow powder, your attacker will remain on an equal par with you: Both blind in the dust fog. And the attack continues.

"not shared for the trolls" Yes. I hate filling out paperwork. When I was racing we had a simple motto on the boat: "If you leave no survivors, you don't waste any time with the protest committee."

I wonder if that works outside the racing circuit too?
 

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Motion detectors at every hardware store about $20.

Just because many local people in the Caribbean are black it doesn't mean you need a gun.

You need a gun more in your own country than the Caribbean.

Yes, you can sail by yourself unless you are a compete idiot.

12 years is self imposed. Get off your fat bum and save more money now and retire in 5 years. I retired at 48 and it was the best decision I ever made.

:)
Whoa...back up the truck. The OP didn't say anything about black people. Are you thinking that Caribbean black people are more prone to violence than other races residing there?
 
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